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Full text of "The Instructor"

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ng: Why Not Course la Each Year?, TW«. ^Hi, 
w Manual for Course 6, Answers to Your 
ns, Memorized Recitations, Coming Events, • Indicates 
Deseret Sunday School Union Board. ., ,, . 

M= Music 
ng: New Singers We Have Always 
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A SONG OF THE HEART 1 

ofo, Lucien Bown; Author, Richard E. Scholle 1 

CHRISTMAS AND THE SPIRIT OF CHRIST 
by President David 0. McKay 


WHAT DOES DEDICATION MEAN? 

by David Boulton 

MAY 1 TEACH WITH COLOR 
by Leon Hartshorn 

THE DIVINE CHURCH RESTORED 

by E. Cecil McGavin 

THE CHALLENGE OF FREE AGENCY 
by Charles Monson 


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TRUE CHRISTMAS JOY 
by Jennette McKay Morrell 

CHRIST AND THE FISHERMEN 1 

Ernst Zimmermann; Author, F, Donald I sbell I 

DAVID AND HIS HARP COMFORT KING SAUL 

by Marie F. Felt 


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IN THE TIME OF THE HERODIANS 
by Burl Shephard 

SING WITH SPIRIT AND WITH UNDERSTANDING 

by Clair W. Johnson 

JUST AN OPTIMIST °»»» ! 
by Wendell J. Ashton | 




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IT IS often said that the happiest season of the 
year is Christmas time. I believe that is true be- 
cause it is then that we have the Christmas spirit 
in our hearts, which is the spirit of Christ, I wish 
we might have that spirit every season of the year, 
every week in the year. 

I love to attend Sunday School and be in the 
presence of children, to listen to their singing and 
speaking in praise of the Redeemer. It is music 
to hear little children speak the name of Jesus. 
There come to me the words of the Saviour, ". . . 
Suffer the little children to come unto me, and for- 
bid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God." 
(Mark 10:14.) It is glorious to hear them sing and 
speak of the first Christmas anthem, "Glory to God 
in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward 
men." (Luke 2:14.) 

Millions Celebrate His Birth 

Millions and millions of people this season will 
celebrate the birth of Christ. Looking at it from a 
natural standpoint, it is really wonderful, because we 
know so little about Him. When we read about 
Abraham Lincoln, we can go through volumes and 
find out about his life, his characteristics, his tem- 
perament, his jocular nature, his moody nature. We 
can look at his photograph and judge him from his 



(For Christmas lessons.) 



There came to me the words of 

the Saviour, "Suffer the little children 

to come unto me and forbid them not; 

for of such is the kingdom of God." 



Christmas 
and 
the Spirit 
of Christ 

by President David 0. McKay 



writings and his sayings. We can interpret them 
more intelligently as we look at his features, an 
iron frame. 

If we study the life of Washington, we are helped 
in the same way. I often think, as I look at the 
portrait of Robert Burns, that his expression, as it 
has come down to us in portraits, is a help in inter- 
preting his poetry. The same is true of Sir Walter 
Scott and other historical geniuses; but in the case 
of Jesus of Nazareth, we have no photograph. 

There is no man who has ever lived since the 
days of those who walked with Him, who can form 
a correct conception of what He looked like, with 
the exception I shall note later. From a human 
standpoint, there is no photograph that will give 
us an exact likeness of His features. Artists have 
painted Him as they thought He looked. The French 
artists have introduced French traits in His picture; 
the Italians, Italian features; and so on. 

Not only have we not His portrait, but we have 
not His sayings in the original. We have His book; 
we have what the apostles remembered He said, 
but even that has not come to us in the language in 
which He spoke it. Even what we have is so little 
that it can be put in a vest pocket edition; and yet 
John tells us that if all He said and all He did were 
written, the world itself could scarcely contain the 
volumes. (See John 21:25.) In comparison to that, 
think how little we have, how little we know from 
a human standpoint. 

(Continued on following page.) 



DECEMBER 1 963 



417 



The Greatest Influence 

Yet, even from the human standpoint, no being 
has ever been on the earth that has wielded a 
thousandth part of the influence which this man of 
Nazareth wields throughout the world. Nearly two 
thousand years have gone, and He is still acknowl- 
edged as the one peerless person in the world. 

Today His life is a more potent factor in influenc- 
ing humanity than it has ever been before, notwith- 
standing the terrible conditions that exist in the 
world today. What is this influence? It is not just 
what He has written. 

Thank heaven we do have a few of His words 
in the Bible, and that we have more of them in 
modern scripture, the Book of Mormon. But all 
told, this amounts to but little, even including the 
more glorious revelations, more direct words, in the 
Doctrine and Covenants. It is not just what He 
said, but rather what He does to our spirits, how 
He influences our hearts and affects the very lives 
of men which makes Him live. It is through that 
power, by the operation of the Holy Ghost, that He 
influences the world, and gives men the power to 
bear testimony to His divinity. In that power, all 
men can read of His life and what He has done 
and can hear His voice through the whisperings of 
the Spirit. All men should do as He has done; that 
is the obligation that comes to us. 

A Lesson in Humility 

On one occasion when He was with the Twelve, 
He performed a sacred ceremony in which He taught 
them the lesson of humility. After He untied the 
towel from His waist, replaced the basin at the door, 
and took His place at the head of the assembly 
again, He said: 

Ye call me Master and Lord: and ye say well; 
for so I am. 

If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed 
your feet; ye also ought to wash one another's feet. 

For I have given you an example, that ye should 
do as I have done to you. (John 13:13-15.) 

There were three principles heralded to the 
world by the angel who came to the shepherds on 
that starry night and told them to: 

. . . Fear not: . . . For unto you is born this day 
in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the 
Lord. . . . 

And suddenly there was with the angel a multi- 
tude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying, 

Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, 
good will toward men. (Luke 2:10, 11, 13, 14.) 



The first principle is a message to all people to 
give glory to God — and godliness was a trait that 
Jesus exemplified every day and every hour of His 
earthly existence here on earth. 

Taught Principle of Godliness 

When He taught the disciples how to pray, the 
simple and beautiful pattern which He gave to them 
and to the world contained that principle of godli- 
ness — ". . . Our Father which art in heaven, Hal- 
lowed be thy name." (Matthew 6:9.) 

After He performed the miracle of feeding the 
five thousand, He saw how the people interpreted 
that power, desiring to make Him king rather than 
to acknowledge the power of God. He dismissed 
them and retired to pray. Later that night, He 
joined His disciples. The people were surprised the 
next morning to find that Jesus was in Capernaum. 
They flocked around Him again, asking Him, no 
doubt, to give them something. They pretended to 
want to know His Gospel, His teachings; but He 
turned, reading their hearts, and said: ". . . Ye seek 
me, not because ye saw the miracles, but because 1 
ye did eat of the loaves, and were filled." (John 
6:26.) Sordid, temporal things dragging their minds 
down! He would lift them up to things which were 
heavenly. Then He gave them that memorable ser- 
mon on the bread of life, a synopsis of which is 
found in John, the eleventh chapter, when he per- 
formed the miracle of raising Lazarus from the dead* 

Taught Principle of Peace 

The second principle, "Peace on earth." Peace! 
Can you think of anything in life that is more accept- 
able than peace? Philosophers have given several 
purposes of life: many say it is happiness, others 
say that duty is the end purpose of life. I believe 
that those who place peace as the purpose come 
nearer to the real purpose. 

When Jesus came forth from the tomb and ap- 
peared to His disciples, His first greeting was, , . . . 
Peace be unto you." (Luke 24:36.) Peace! You 
find it on His lips all the way through His life. Peace 
is exemption from individual turmoil, from family 
broils, from national difficulties. Peace refers to 
the individual just as much as it does to commu- 
nities. That man is not at peace who is untrue to 
the whisperings of Christ, to the promptings of his 
conscience. He cannot be at peace when he is un- 
true to his better self; when he transgresses the law 
of righteousness, either in dealing with himself by 
indulging in passion or in appetite, yielding to the 
temptations of the flesh, or when he is unjust, trans- 



418 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



gressing the law of righteousness in dealing with his 
fellowmen. 

Oh, if we could only have peace! And peace 
comes through obedience to the Gospel of Jesus 
Christ; but the spirit of the flesh, the spirit of the 
world is antagonistic to the establishment of peace. 
Just think what it would mean today if only that 
spirit would penetrate the hearts of rulers of captive 
nations; if they could only have confidence in their 
fellowmen, and confidence in their God. I believe, 
when we read of the glorious message from that 
heavenly host which shall be to all people, that we 
ought to think just of that one word, peace, and the 
conditions that go to establish it. Happiness follows 
then — not mere pleasure — but happiness. Duty is 
a fundamental requirement in obtaining that peace. 
There is no peace in the violation of duty or in the 
neglect of duty. It is the little things which con- 
stantly are being performed that produce peace; 
it is the little things which are neglected that destroy 
peace. 

Taught Principle of Brotherliness 

The third principle heralded by the heavenly 
host is good will toward men. We shall call it 
brotherliness. I cannot think of any other word that 
seems so expressive or that will give such an oppor- 
tunity to emphasize good will toward men as broth- 
erliness. All men, the poor, and even the sinner, 
were recipients of His kindness and His blessings. 

Christ taught us to set our hearts not upon the 
things of this world, but upon God and godly things. 
And that is the obligation which comes to us — to 
preach and to live godly lives, to have reverence for 
our Father in heaven; to pray to Him and to teach 
our children to have reverence and pray to Him. 
Not only that, but we should teach them to honor 
and revere sacred things. Jesus not only had rev- 
erence for His Father, but He had reverence for 
those things which were God's. He denounced the 
men of His time who defaced or defamed sacred 
edifices. He cleansed the temple by driving the 
money changers away, and to those who sold the 
doves He said, "... Take these things hence; make 
not my Father's house an house of merchandise." 
(John 2:16.) Another time He said, ". . .ye have 
made it a den of thieves." (Matthew 21:13.) It 
was God's house. 

In that beautiful Sermon on the Mount, to those 
who would swear by the heaven, and others who 
would swear by the earth to make an oath a sacred 
one, He said: ". . . Swear not at all; neither by heav- 



en; for it is God's throne: Nor by the earth; for it is 
his footstool: . . ." (Matthew 5:34-35.) 

There is the example; and I wish that we might 
follow it and impress it upon our children during 
these times. It is not uncommon, as we walk along 
the street, to hear young people, sometimes little 
children, profaning. They have not learned that 
lesson of godliness; or, if they have, the habits of 
their associates are such that the teachings of par- 
ents have gone unheeded. That is the second condi- 
tion of peace, and the third is brotherly kindness. 
Thank Heaven for the Christmas spirit that brings 
us closer to each other in expression of that brother- 
hood. 

Knowledge of the Redeemer 

And so I say from a human standpoint it is sur- 
prising, since we know so little about the Redeemer, 
since so little is written about Him, that His power 
is felt throughout the world as it is. However, from 
the divine standpoint, there is no surprise; and from 
the standpoint of the members of The Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we do know more 
about Him. There was a boy in this dispensation 
who did know what He looks like, for he saw Him: 
Joseph Smith, the Prophet, saw the Redeemer with 
His Father, and he has given that testimony to the 
world and has recorded His messages for this gen- 
eration, in this, the Dispensation of the Fullness of 
Times. What a mighty responsibility, then, rests 
upon us! Of all the Christian people throughout the 
civilized world, none carries the responsibility that 
a member of this Church carries today; and we must 
strive to follow the example of the Redeemer. 

As we approach the New Year, I think it is most 
appropriate to repent and strive for something that 
is better; strive for something that is higher; intro- 
duce more godliness into our lives; establish peace 
first in our hearts; see that our families are at peace 
in the neighborhood; and use our influence as mem- 
bers of the Church in establishing peace in all the 
world. We can do this by that God-like, Christ-like 
principle of service. Every man, woman, and child 
in this Church has an opportunity to render that 
service to mankind. 

May His peace and contentment abide in every 
home. May the cheer of Christmas time which 
springs from the true spirit of brotherhood, which 
is the spirit of Christ, be with us and remain with 
us throughout the entire year that is coming! 



Library Pile Reference: Jesus Christ. 



PECEMBER 1963 



419 




The chapel at Merthyr Tydfil. 

A CHOICE OPPORTUNITY WAS MINE 
WHEN MY DAUGHTER ASKED . . . 

What Does 
Dedication Mean? 

by David Boulton* 

"Dad, what did you do at Merthyr Tydfil?" 

This question was from my daughter, Kay. It 
was different from her usual run of questions, such as, 
"Dad, what did you do in the war?" or "Dad, what 
did you do when dinosaurs were here on the earth?" 
Kay is seven and inquisitive. 

I had the privilege of travelling from South 
London, where I live, to attend the dedication of 
the new chapel at Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales, in 
August when President David O. McKay flew over 
here especially for the service. As usual Kay was 
full of questions about my trip. 

"Well, I went to Merthyr to report on the dedi- 
cation of the new chapel there." 

"What does dedication mean, Dad?" 

"Dedication has two meanings, Kay. If you 
dedicate yourself to something, to service in the 
Church or to service in a hospital as a nurse or a 
doctor — it means that you promise to spend your 
time in doing the work that you are asked to do. 
For instance, if you were to dedicate your life to 
being a doctor, then you would promise to give your 
time and energy to healing sick people. 

"The second meaning of the word dedication is 
used in connection with chapels, temples, and other 
buildings. In this case, when a chapel is dedicated 
it means that the building has been set apart as a 
special house for use in worshiping our Heavenly 



(For Course 4, lesson of January 12, "Chapels Are Built"; and 
for general reading. ) 

♦Brother David Boulton is employed as Managing Editor of the 
Millennial Star. He, his wife, and their then two children were 
baptized in 1957. Five children are now in their family. Since 
joining the Church, Brother Boulton has served in various Church 
positions, including first counselor in the Birmingham District 
Presidency, Leicester Stake Mission President, and South London 
Ward Sunday School Superintendent. He is now first counselor in 
the South London Ward Bishopric. 



Father, learning about Him, and teaching His 
Gospel on the earth. His prophet, David 0. McKay, 
'consecrated it as a place of worship, a house of 
learning, a center of wholesome and spiritual en- 
lightenment.' President McKay also asked Heav- 
enly Father to 'watch over and bless all those who 
use this chapel, the organ, the classrooms, the 
kitchen, the Relief Society room, and the Cultural 
Hall.' " 

"Is that what President McKay did at Merthyr, 
then, Dad?" 

"Yes, Kay, that's right. In his prayer of dedi- 
cation, he said to our Heavenly Father, 'We dedi- 
cate the chapel particularly as a place of worship. 
May each one feel when he comes here that he 
come to meet Thee.' 

"Then he went on to dedicate the classrooms 
and to ask God to bless the teachers; then the 
kitchens, and he asked God to bless all the sisters in 
the Relief Society. He dedicated the Cultural Hall 
'in which proper recreation, study in literature, 
drama, and other activities so attractive to the young 
may be carried on under wholesome influence.' " 
"What does wholesome influence mean, Dad?" 
"Well, Kay, a wholesome influence is one which 
produces spiritual health and happiness. It is a 
condition which helps us become more in tune with 
our Father in heaven, so that we can carry on His 
work." 

"What else did President McKay say, Dad?" 
"He asked God 'to protect it [this building]; 
shield it from harm and destructive elements; . . .' 
He also said that 'we dedicate our lives once again 
to Thee, and pray for strength so to live that we 
may merit Thy guiding influence to the fullest 
extent.' " 

"Did he say all those things, Dad?" 
"Yes, indeed!" 

"Will he say all those things when our chapel is 
built and dedicated?" 

"Well, I don't know for sure if President McKay 
will even come back for the dedication of our chapel, 
but one of the General Authorities will be here. 
And whoever it is, he will say many wonderful 
things. Our chapels are houses of the Lord, Kay. 
In them we learn all about Him, and His Son, 
Jesus Christ. We learn how to behave towards one 
another, to love our neighbors as ourselves." 

"When will our chapel be built, Dad? Can I go 
to the dedication? Will the Prophet come to dedi- 
cate our chapel? What will he say? What will . . .?" 

That's just like Kay. She's seven and inquisi- 
tive, and "filled clear up to the eyebrows" with 
questions. 



Library File Reference: Dedication. 



420 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



May I Teach witli Color 

TEACHER IMPROVEMENT LESSON FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 

by Leon Hartshorn* 



One summer evening I lay on a brilliant carpet 
of green lawn, situated on a hillside. The sun was 
making a final show of splendor before hiding itself 
behind the mountain. I looked up into a sky that 
was an exquisite shade of blue; here and there were 
clouds, suspended like fluffy cotton in the air. Stately 
trees in different shades of green framed my picture. 
A robin picking an insect from the air distracted me 
momentarily, and then my eyes fell upon a family 
of grouse in quest of food; they had ventured within 
ten feet of me. Simultaneously the singing of birds 
in the surrounding trees delighted me. 

I looked up at the towering, rugged mountains 
with their different hues of gray, brown, tan, and 
green. From my vantage point I could also see the 
valley beneath with its gaily colored homes and trim 
fields. Within my whole being I felt quiet peace 
and joy. I reflected deeply about God and 
tried to comprehend how He must have felt in creat- 
ing such a magnificent world as this: 

And God saw every thing that he had made, and 
behold, it was very good. {Genesis 2:31.) 



*Brother Leon R. Hartshorn is director of the Institute of Re- 
ligion at Stanford University. He taught Seminary three years and 
was director of the Institute of Religion at Boise Junior College. 
He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Brigham Young Univer- 
sity and is working on his Ph.D. at Stanford. He has held various 
positions in the Church, including one as a missionary in the Northern 
States Mission and another as a stake mission president. He is mar- 
ried to the former Beatrice Scoville. They have four children. 



Using my imagination, I closed my eyes to shut 
out the colors before me. I tried to gain some con- 
cept of what this inspiring picture would be if 
everything lacked color. Immediately a comparison 
of black-and-white versus color movies came to my 
mind. A pallor fell over me. I realized how drab 
and dull the world would be if God had left out 
color when he created it. 

I compared this to teaching; and I asked myself, 
"Do I teach the Gospel with all the brilliance of 
color, or do I teach in drab black-and-white? Do 
I radiate the vivid hues of righteousness, love, and 
excitement about God, the Gospel, and life. Is my 
teaching as vigorous, alive, and inviting as the glor- 
ious scene that lies before me; or am I guilty, as a 
teacher, of letting worries, problems, anxieties, sick- 
ness, neglected prayers, or weak faith convey a 
picture in drab, gray tones to my students?" 

I would be one of those gifted teachers who bring 
to the youth of the Church the Gospel message in 
glorious technicolor. I would have my students con- 
tract from me an insatiable desire for knowledge and 
righteousness, that they may be placed on the path- 
way of happiness and eternal life. 

May I radiate the brilliance of the Gospel plan, 
that my students may see it in all of its color and 
glory! 



Library File Reference : Teachers and Teaching. 



INSTRUCTOR STAFF 



Editor: 
President David O. McKay 

Associate Editors: 

General Superintendent George R. Hill 

Lorin F. Wheelwright 

Business Manager: 
Richard E. Folland 

Managing Editor: 
Boyd O. Hatch 

Production Editor: 
Burl Shephard 

Manuscript Editor: 
Richard E. Scholle 

Research Editor: 
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Art Director: 
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Circulation Manager: 
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Bennett, Camille W. Halliday, Margaret 
Hopkinson, Edith M. Nash, Alva H. Parry, 
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inson, Bertrand F. Harrison, Willis S. Peter- 
son, Greldon L. Nelson, G. Robert Ruff, 
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vin C. Cook, A. Hamer Reiser, Clarence L. 
Madsen, J. Elliot Cameron. 



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DECEMBER 1963 



421 



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IN the humble home of Peter Whitmer, Sr., in 
Fayette, New York, The Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter-day Saints was organized on Tuesday, 
Apr. 6, 1830. The farm folk who participated in 
that significant meeting were most likely happy to 
leave their labors in the field and assist in launching 
the Lord's Church on its mission. 

It is customary to transact most Church busi- 
ness on Sunday, but the organization of the Church 
was reserved for this special day because it was the 
the Lord's birthday. The new Church was His 
birthday gift to the world. (See Doctrine and Cov- 
enants 20:1.) 

The laws of the land in those days required that 
at least six persons be united to form any new organ- 
ization or church. The following brethren were 
instrumental in perfecting the new organization 
which was to commemorate the Lord's birthday as 
well as to bear His holy name: Joseph Smith, Jr.; 
Hyrum Smith; Oliver Cowdery; David Whitmer; 
Samuel Harrison Smith; and Peter Whitmer, Jr. 

Reverends Lane, Townsend and other ministers 
in that area might have regarded this historic meet- 
ing as a mere boys' club or even a juvenile debating 
society. The men present at the organization of 
the Church in this Dispensation were all between 
the ages of 21 and 30. Hyrum Smith was 30 years 
old at the time, Oliver Cowdery was 26, Joseph 
Smith and David Whitmer were 25, Samuel H. 
Smith was 22, and Peter Whitmer was 21. 



(For Course 6, lesson of February 9, "The Gospel Restored and 
the Church Organized"; and for Course 28, lesson of January 19, 
"The Prophet Joseph Smith"; and for general reading.) 

* Brother E. Cecil McGavin received his formal education from 
Brigham Young University and the University of Utah. He serves 
as a stake superintendent of Sunday Schools, as a lecturer at BYU 
Adult Education Center in Salt Lake City; and he has authored 17 
LDS Church books. He is married to the former Hattie Parkinson. 
They have two daughters and two sons. 



*' ?m-9P%* 



wm 




Joseph Smith, Jr. 

The Prophet undoubtedly realized what a mighty 
miracle had been wrought that day and during the 
14 years that followed until 1844. In order for that 
once obscure farm boy to help shape the destiny of 
that growing institution, the Church, he would have 
to devote the full vigor of his magnetic personality 
to advancing the divine cause. Five years after the 
Church had been organized, Joseph received happi- 
ness and satisfaction in seeing the young Church 
expand until the First Presidency, the Council of 
the Twelve, and the Seven Presidents of the Sev- 
enty had been duly called and organized. 

Few men in the history of mankind have been 
more loyal and devoted to their calling than was 
Joseph Smith, Jr., to his. He had such a clear 
understanding of this divine mission that he gladly 
sealed his testimony with his blood. 

Hyrum Smith 

His older brother, Hyrum, was equally devoted 
to the holy cause of the Restoration, marching 
shoulder to shoulder with the Prophet throughout 
the years. Hyrum filled many important missions 
and Church assignments. Upon the death of Joseph 
Smith, Sr., in 1840, Hyrum was sustained as Patri- 
arch to the Church. Four of his many descendants 
have since then followed him in that important 
office — his son, John Smith; his grandson, Hyrum 
G. Smith; his great-grandson, Joseph F. Smith, and 
his second great-grandson, Eldred G. Smith (our 



422 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



The Divine 
Church Restored 



by E. Cecil McGavin* 



The log house of Peter Whitmer, Sr., in Fayette, New York, 

was a focal point of Church history. It was within these 

walls that the Prophet Joseph Smith and Oliver Cow- 

dery finished translating the Golden Plates, that the 

Angel Moroni returned the plates to Joseph, that 

Joseph received revelations, that the Church 

| ,v was organized, and that the first three general 

\ A conferences of the Restored Church were held. 



$!<>!? 



present patriarch.) Three of Hy rum's worthy de- 
scendants have been called to serve in the Council 
of the Twelve — President Joseph F. Smith, who 
also served as President of the Church for 17 years; 
Hyrum Mack Smith, and Joseph Fielding Smith, 
now president of The Council of the Twelve. 

Oliver Cowdery 

Oliver Cowdery served as scribe for the Prophet. 
He was present with the Prophet when the keys of 
the Aaronic and Melchizedek Priesthoods were re- 
stored in May and June of 1829, respectively. The 
first Sunday following the organization of the 
Church, Apr. 11, 1830, Oliver Cowdery preached the 
first public discourse in the newly organized Church. 
From that time forward through the next eight years 
he supported the Prophet Joseph as the new move- 
ment of the Church gathered momentum. 

With three companions, Oliver made what in 
those days was considered a long journey, from New 
York to western Missouri, the "land of the Laman- 
ites." He went there as a missionary to tell the 
descendants of Lehi about the sacred book of their 
forefathers, the Book of Mormon. Though he never 
became a member of the Council of the Twelve, he 
did serve as Assistant President of the Church. (For 
full statment in this regard see Joseph Fielding 
Smith, Essentials in Church History.) 

Oliver married David Whitmer's sister, Elizabeth 
Ann Whitmer, after the Whitmer family had moved 
to Missouri. Theirs was the first Mormon marriage 
performed in Missouri. Oliver was later placed in 
charge of publishing the Evening and Morning Star. 
He also operated the Church printing press in In- 
dependence, Missouri, and supervised the printing 
of many publications, including the Book of Com- 
mandments. When the printing of this book was 
more than half completed, a mob broke into Oliver's 
print shop and destroyed the press, scattered the 
type, and put an end to the publication. 



Oliver served as a member of the first high coun- 
cil in Kirtland. He assisted in the selection of the 
first Council of the Twelve. He witnessed the mir- 
aculous visions in the Kirtland Temple; and for eight 
years after the humble meeting in the Whitmer 
home, he was a loyal and devoted disciple of the 
Restoration. 

He was a fourth cousin to the Prophet. After 
assisting Joseph for many years, Oliver fell in with 
some apostates and allowed them to embitter his 
mind and lead him out of the Church. Ten years 
later he returned to the Church and expressed a 
desire to go on a mission to England; but before his 
wish could be fulfilled, he died. 

David Whitmer 

David Whitmer, another organizer of the Church, 
was also a loyal disciple of the Prophet and a faith- 
ful member of the Church until bitter persecutions 
in Missouri separated the wheat from the tares. 
The Whitmers were among the first Mormon fam- 
ilies to settle in Jackson County, Missouri. In 1834 
David was made president of the high council in 
Missouri. When the panic of 1837 closed the Kirt- 
land Safety Society (a bank), he became very bitter. 
The following year he was excommunicated on five 
charges brought against him. Although he lived 
to be 83, he never manifested any desire to return 
to the Church. He did, however, remain true to his 
testimony found in the front of the Book of Mor- 
mon, that he had seen the gold plates, that he had 
conversed with the Angel Moroni, and that "the 
voice of the Lord" had spoken to him. 

Samuel Harrison Smith 

Samuel Harrison Smith, the Prophet's younger 
brother, had the distinction of being the first mis- 
sionary in the Church. He left a copy of the new 
book with the family of the Reverend John P. 
Greene. That book was instrumental in bringing 
into the Church the Greene family, the Heber C. 
Kimball family, Brigham Young and his brothers, 
and perhaps others who had read that copy of the 
Book of Mormon in Mendon, New York, long before 
they had ever been contacted by LDS missionaries. 

Samuel went with Orson Hyde to the eastern 
states on an extended missionary tour. In Boston 
he baptized a young woman, Mary Bailey, whom he 

(Concluded on page 425.) 



DECEMBER 1963 



423 



Tlie Challenge 
of Free Agency 



by Charles H. Monson' 



Editor's Note: For further discussion on free 
agency versus freedom, see "And the Truth 
Shall Make You Free," by Lowell L. Bennion 
(lesson 6 of Jesus the Christ, chapter 25), on 
page 437 of this issue. 



J, the Lord God, make you free, therefore ye are 
free indeed. . . . — Doctrine and Covenants 98:8. 

Latter-day Saint theology has always emphasized 
the importance of free choice in its account of man's 
nature. In the pre-existence, Satan was despised 
because he ". . . sought to reject the agency of 
man. . . ." (Moses 4:3.) In this life, each of us is 
rewarded or punished according to the choices he 
makes. And in the hereafter, we will have respon- 
sibility for our own creations. 

There are three main reasons which usually are 
given to support this view. First, it is scriptural, as 
is evidenced by the above example, one of many, 
from the Doctrine and Covenants, the Bible, and 
other scriptures. Second, the experience of choice is 
one of the most fundamental experiences in human 
life, for each of us believes he freely chooses to do 
one thing rather than another on innumerable occa- 
sions, and that he has a choice to make. But most 
important, freedom is said to be a prior condition 
for responsibility. If I perform an action, then I 
am responsible for its consequences; but if I do not 
act or if someone else uses me to achieve his pur- 
poses, then I should not be rewarded or punished; 
for I have not taken the action. As Aristotle said 
long ago: "If committing disgraceful actions and 
likewise refraining from them rests with ourselves, 
it follows that our morality or immorality rests with 
ourselves." 

For many people, these reasons are sufficient to 
establish the conclusion. However, since the fifth 
century when Pelagius and Augustine argued the 

(For Course 26, lesson of February 9, "And the Truth Shall 
Make You Free"; and for general reading.) 

*Brother Charles H. Monson, Jr., is an associate professor and 
head of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Utah. 
He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Utah, 
and his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1952. He has taught also 
at the University of Nevada and Chico State College. He is a 
teacher in Sunday School and MIA classes. Brother Monson is 
married to the former Vivian Turley. They have three children. 



point, the doctrine of free agency has been the sub- 
ject for many vigorous discussions and much sophis- 
ticated thinking, both inside and outside Christian 
tradition. Many objections have been raised to the 
belief that man is a freely choosing agent, but two 
of the most important have been the doctrines of 
religious predestination and scientific determinism. 
The theory of predestination was first clearly sug- 
gested by Paul: 

For whom he did foreknow, he also did predes- 
tinate to be conformed to the image of his Son, that 
he might be the firstborn among many brethren. 

Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he 
also called: and who he called, them he also justified: 
and whom he justified, them he also glorified. (Ro- 
mans 8:29, 30.) 

Therefore, according to Paul, God foreknew and 
predestined those who would be glorified. But be- 
yond the scriptures, predestinarianism has its origin 
in the conception of God as a creator ex nihilo, that 
is, a being who brought all things into existence not 
by rearranging pre-existing elements, but by creating 
them out of nothing. And since He created and thus 
knew their total nature, He also knew their future. 
To say He did not also determine that future would 
be to say that He did not know and create every- 
thing, an impossibility in this conception of God. 
In addition, this teaching rests on a certain estimate 
of human nature. John Calvin has stated it clearly: 

Let us hold this, then, as an undoubted truth, 
which no opposition can ever shake, that the mind 
of man is so completely alienated from the righteous- 
ness of God, that it conceives, desires and undertakes 
everything that is impious, perverse, base, impure, 
and flagitious; and that his heart is so thoroughly 
infested by the poison of sin, that it cannot produce 
anything but what is corrupt. 1 

Since man is evil, only an infusion of God's 
goodness can make him righteous; and, since this 
must be originated by God, man is not free to will 
or achieve his own salvation. 

This view has had many defenders within the 
Christian tradition. Paul's suggestion was developed 
and defended by Augustine, accepted in modified 
form by Aquinas, and made a cornerstone in the 
theology of many Protestant reformers. One of 
America's greatest thinkers, Jonathan Edwards, 
argued vigorously for an uncompromising predestin- 
arianism, and while the teaching is not as widely ac- 
cepted today as it was in the past, its vestiges still 
can be found in church creeds and in many people's 
attitude toward life. 

A second challenge to the doctrine of free agency 

*A Compend. of the Institutes of the Christian Religion, edited 
by Hugh Thompson Kerr, Jr., Board of Christian Education of the 
Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, Pa., 1939; Book II, chapter 4. 



424 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



can be suggested briefly by Sir Isaac Newton's pref- 
ace to his epoch-making Mathematical Principles of 
Natural Philosophy: 

From the phenomena of motions we are led to 
investigate the forces of nature, and from these 
forces to demonstrate the other phenomena. I am 
induced by many reasons to suspect that all the 
phenomena of nature may depend upon certain 
forces by which the particles of bodies, by some 
causes hitherto unknown, are impelled toward each 
other or are repelled and recede from one another. 2 

Newton's life was devoted to a search for those 
"causes hitherto unknown," for he believed that all 
the phenomena of nature could be understood in 
terms of force and these in terms of preceding forces 
so that a knowledge of all the preceding causes 
would give a complete understanding — and predic- 
tion — of any phenomenon, including man. Thus, 
there are no fortuitous or free events occurring in the 



2 Newton, Sir Isaac, Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; 
translated by Andrew Mott, University of California at Berkeley Press, 
1934; preface. 



world; cause and effect relationships encompass all. 
It is clear that those who uphold the doctrine of 
free agency must defend it against determined op- 
position from many sources, including both religious 
teachings and scientific presuppositions. They must 
also defend it from the charge that if man freely 
chooses all he does, there is no need for God's help; 
hence, a humanistic rather than a Christian view of 
man seems to be advocated. 

Precisely where Latter-day Saint theology stands 
on these particular issues is a matter requiring fur- 
ther discussion, but this much can be said: There is 
freedom only when there is uncertainty, and when 
alternative answers are possible. If freedom im- 
plies responsibility, then responsibility requires 
knowledge of these alternatives, and no one should 
rest content with his own answer until he has ex- 
amined carefully the other possibilities. In the final 
analysis this questioning process may be the surest 
proof of an individual's own free agency. 

Library Pile Reference: Free Agency. 



THE DIVINE CHURCH RESTORED (Concluded from page 423.) 



later married. In that same city he also baptized 
Agnes Coolbrith, who later married the Prophet's 
younger brother, Don Carlos. The two missionaries 
continued north to Main where they baptized many 
converts, one, an Arthur Milliken, who later mar- 
ried Lucy Smith, Joseph's youngest sister. 

Samuel Smith was always a faithful member of 
the Church, supporting and upholding his brothers 
to the fullest extent. When he heard that Joseph 
and Hyrum had decided not to make the long jour- 
ney into the far West but had returned to Carthage 
for trial, he hastened to the county seat in order 
to warn them of confronting dangers; but by the 
time he arrived in Carthage, his brothers were dead. 
One month later, sensitive, tender-hearted Samuel 
died. However, many of his descendants are still 
in the Church today. 

Peter Whitmer, Jr. 

Peter Whitmer, Jr., was called on a mission — the 
Lamanite Mission in Missouri — sponsored by the 
newly organized Church. After the missionaries 
had arrived in Independence, Peter found employ- 
ment as a tailor and raised funds to support them. 
Later when the Saints began to settle in Missouri, 
he was an active worker in their midst. He was 
ordained a high priest by Oliver Cowdery in 1831. 



He was among the exiles who were forced to flee from 
Jackson County. He died in 1836 near Liberty, 
Missouri, and was buried beside his brother, Chris- 
tian, who had died about ten months earlier. 

The Whitmer family had not left the Church 
when these two men died. Both brothers were among 
the eight witnesses of the Book of Mormon, while 
Peter also assisted with the organization of the 
Church. 

These were the humble men who helped lay the 
foundations of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints. In 1844, after the martyrdom of Joseph 
Smith and his brother, Hyrum, there were many 
prejudiced people who predicted that the new move- 
ment would soon disappear from the earth because 
its leaders were gone. Many of these men considered 
the Church a man-made organization; they left God 
completely out of man's doings, a thing which Jo- 
seph Smith and his colleagues had never thought of 
doing. Despite the death of the Prophet, the Church 
grew and is continuing to grow today. 

With the Psalmist they agreed: 

Except the Lord build the house, They labour 
in vain that build it: Except the Lord keep the 
city, The watchman waketh but in vain. (Psalms 
127:1.) 

Library File Reference: ]Vi.>rmon Church — History. 



DECEMBER 1 963 



425 




JlX, J&L /Wt6z^v*vu£oc4L 



GOSPEL LIVING IN THE HOME 




by Paul Vorkink 



** 



Editor's Note: The manual, Gospel Living in the Home, 
that was used in 1963 as the Gospel Poctrine Course of 
study, will be repeated in 1964 for the Family Relations 
Course, No. 24. The manual is thought-provoking and an 
effective tool for parents who desire to encourage the learn- 
ing and living of Gospel principles at home. Following is 
response of one who used the manual. — Boyd O. Hatch. 

Somebody ought to pinch me! 

I just can't quite believe it myself. 

I thought I had enjoyed every possible Sunday 
School thrill. I have been a lifelong Sunday School 
attender, a teacher of practically every course, an 
assistant and superintendent in both ward and stake 
work, a board member, a mission Sunday School 
supervisor. You name the Sunday School job; and, 
sometime or other, I have held it. I cannot claim, 
of course, to have been any more than willing in 
many of these callings; but the satisfactions and 
pleasures which have come to me from this long 
association have been most rewarding. 

So I had thought that there were no possible 
new thrills yet to come from my Sunday School 
work. I anticipated recurring joys but new ones 
were just impossible. That is, until this year. My, 
how my attitude has changed during this year! 

In January, 1963, our ward (Cedar Sixth, Cedar 
City, Utah) faced a not unusual Sunday School 
dilemma. We had been meeting on a divided plan, 

(For Course 24, Gospel Living in the Home; and for general 
reading.) 

*"This inscription ["R] which has been used on prescriptions 
and formulas for more than 6,000 years, is an abbreviation of 'recipe,' 
Latin word for 'take thou.' Originally was used as an invocation to 
Jupiter, the lucky planet which guarded the sick." — Martin, Eric W., 
and Cook, E. Fullerton, Remington's Practice of Pharmacy, 1956 
edition; Mack Publishing Company, Easton, Pa. 

** Brother Vorkink is on the staff of the College of Southern 
Utah. He and his wife, Beryl, have five children. 



with A and B sessions to accommodate our com- 
paratively large ward. However, our Superintend- 
ency decided to consolidate our organization; and 
this plan led to combining our two Gospel Doctrine 
classes. I was to be the instructor. 

I was less than enthusiastic when advised of 
these plans and doubly hesitant when informed 
that I was to teach from a new text, Gospel Living 
in the Home. I had thoroughly enjoyed the intimate, 
friendly class of the B session, and I was apprehen- 
sive concerning this new venture. 

I went home and debated briefly with myself as 
to whether or not to continue in this work. The idea 
of "let someone else do the trail blazing" seemed to 
permeate my thoughts. 

Stretching out on the couch for my Sunday after- 
noon siesta, I found myself perusing the foreword in 
the new manual. These words caught my eye: 

. . . This manual encourages adults, whether 
they be parents, grandparents, or friends of children, 
to engage each other and younger family members 
in activities that lead to Gospel living. It is de- 
signed to take t( lessons" beyond the mere telling 
stage into a realm of application which will test the 
principles discussed. . . . 

That foreword must have been written with me 
in mind. Once I had read the first page, I knew 
that here was a manual just for me! During a dozen 
or so experiences in conducting teacher-training 
courses, there certainly was one philosophy I in- 
variably emphasized. My parents had done a su- 
perb job of convincing me that the Gospel must be 
lived every minute of the day if it is ever to approach 
its potential. We receive periodic prods to remem- 
ber the daily application; but, human-like, we often 
just recall these during class discussions; and we 



426 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



let them remain sort of an idealistic longing which 
we admire but seldom act upon. 

Here, however, was a text — at long last — that 
thoroughly and carefully scrutinized fundamental 
Gospel principles; then, starting with this scrutiny, 
the study concentrated on putting into actual prac- 
tice these same principles. I was ready to go, right 
then and there! 

The introduction of this concept of Sunday 
School association in our class was rather routinely 
accepted at the outset. As instructor, I seemed to 
sense sort of a "ho-hum" attitude. Just before 
complete resignation set in, however, the memory 
of a mountain adventure saved me. 

Several years ago my brother-in-law and I took 
our sons on a pack trip into the high Sierras. We 
spent two days hiking to an isolated, virgin, moun- 
tain lake where we set up camp for a week of glorious, 
adventuresome living. One day we decided to take 
a plunge into that crystal water. The boys and I 
probed a tentative toe, or foot at most, into the 
icy water. We made a big show of bravery when 
we immersed up to the ankle or the knee. 

My brother-in-law scoffed at us and chided, "If 
we're going to swim, let's swim!" He dived into the 
water and began frisking around with such enthus- 
iasm that we finally followed his lead. 

Here in our Cedar Sixth Ward adult class was 
a new plan and a new organization. If we were 
going to work with it, we might as well go all the 
way. And we did. 

Our first noticeable success came when we con- 
sidered the applications our text suggested for Chap- 
ter One: 

"... Write down your purpose in life. . . En- 
courage your family members to do the same. . . . 
Share them. . . ." 

It took us almost a month to conclude the shar- 
ing with one another of the goals our various fam- 
ilies concocted. Our discussions centered mostly 
on how to accomplish these goals. Could they be 
accomplished? We noted a marked and dramatic 
upsurge in "family-night" meetings in our ward. 

These initial discussions, which soon became very 
practical and upbuilding, found us sharing activities 
we had individually experienced in our families dur- 
ing the week. Some of our plans seemed to work 
well, while others often were less successful. When 
we fell short of our hopes, we tried to ascertain what 
further adjustments we could make to enrich our 
efforts. 

One of the most stimulating early assignments 
which was unusually rewarding was the attempt to 
compose lyrics to some favorite LDS hymn espe- 
cially in praise of the Saviour. Several families 
arranged for a joint-family project in this endeavor, 



while many class members composed individual ex- 
pressions. I suspect that Shakespeare or Longfellow 
would not be jealous of our efforts, yet we are very 
proud of them. 

I can think of no minor activity which caused 
more amusement in Cedar City than did our Sunday 
School class experiment "of the beans." This idea 
climaxed the study of love of mankind, and its plan 
was to have each individual move a bean from one 
pocket to another upon the performance of some 
kindness to his fellowman. The text suggested using 
merely ten beans for this reminder device of doing 
a good turn. A couple of Cedar Sixth warders 
employed a pocketful of beans and were determined 
to keep reminding themselves to perform kindnesses 
until all beans were properly transferred! The grocer 
in our ward reported a spirited sale of beans during 
that week. 

One idea which this text, Gospel Living in the 
Home, stresses is the concept of the "teaching mo- 
ment." This refers to particularly appropriate or 
apt circumstances in our daily lives which seem 
timely for the teaching of a particular concept. Our 
lessons emphasize the great skill the Saviour used 
in capitalizing upon "teaching moments"; our class 
is currently debating if the conscientious LDS par- 
ent should or can structure these moment^ so that 
some of them may occur by parental design in order 
to make Gospel teaching more meaningful in the 
home. We will probably spend several weeks con- 
sidering this principle. 

I certainly would not go so far as to claim that 
this text, Gospel Living in the Home, is revolution- 
izing our Gospel Doctrine study in the Cedar Sixth 
Ward. But it has given us a fresh, practical approach 
that has been most stimulating in combining an 
analysis of Gospel principles and in fusing them into 
our daily living. 

Our weekly class discussions are lively and cer- 
tainly not stereotyped. We have been probing into 
family problems with an energy I have never before 
experienced. We have a large group, but we en- 
courage all to participate, and this sharing has been 
rewarding. We find our visitors fall in with our 
cogitations with enthusiasm and one time we even 
benefited from the advice of some visiting mission- 
aries — active missionaries of another faith who 
dropped in on us. 

It seems to me that anyone who is convinced 
that the Gospel is a 24-hour-a-day plan could not 
help but be inspired by the unifying, inspiring, family 
approach which this manual presents. I know of 
seven cases where this text has been officially 
adopted as a course of study for family night pro- 
grams. It can help any Gospel scholar. 



Library File Reference : Gospel Living. 



DECEMBER 1963 



427 



: "■ T" ': 




THE JOHN TAYLOR FAMILY HAS . . . 

Organized 
For Posterity 



by Frank C. Taylor* 



Our John Taylor Family Association grew out 
of a custom of celebrating the birthday of our re- 
vered head, President John Taylor. It is the big 
event of the year for all of us. We look forward to 
it year round and center our new clothing to this 
occasion. We even try to follow the example of 
John Taylor by dressing our very best and showing 
our best manners. He was always meticulously 
dressed and had the dignity and manners of a noble- 
man. This family gathering on November 1 is held 
annually and has been perpetuated right down to 
the present. It has become known as a "Family 
Reunion." An organization has been duly effected 
with president, secretary, treasurer, and committees. 
Programs and invitations are printed well in ad- 
vance of our meetings, and mailed to all members. 

John Taylor made a wide and thorough investi- 
gation of religion, searched the scriptures prayer- 
fully, and compared all sects in a sincere effort to 
find the truth. Soon after his conversion to Mor- 
monism he was called to an important position and 
came in contact with the Prophet Joseph Smith who 
became his closest friend and tutor. Through this 
relationship and through the Spirit of God he be- 
came acquainted with the prophecies and revelations 
given through Joseph Smith. 

A feeling of love also extended to his parents and 
all those relatives on the other side of the veil. He 
was well aware of the responsibility devolving upon 
him for their salvation and of the dire consequence 
if he neglected temple work. This knowledge 
prompted him to stress genealogical research and 
temple work on a level of equal importance with that 
of preaching the Gospel to the living. Of the family 
committees, the genealogical and temple committees 
received the greatest attention. He foresaw the work 

(For Course 20, lesson of February 16, "What Can a Family 
Association Do?") 

* Brother Frank C Taylor is a grandson of President John Taylor, 
third president of the Church. He is qualified as author of this 
article since he serves as Chairman of the Genealogical and Temple 
Committee in the John Taylor Family Association. He is an alumnus 
of four educational institutions: Granite Stake Academy, LDS Uni- 
versity, University of Utah, and New York University. He is also a 
member of the Emeritus Club at the University of Utah. His wife 
is the former Bessie Elinor Taylor. They have six children, 28 
grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. 

THE INSTRUCTOR 



that would have to be done and the temples that 
would have to be built. At one time he said that 
we have built temples, "and we expect to build hun- 
dreds of them yet. . . ."* 

The Spirit of Elijah was working upon Church 
members with such fervor that ordinance work was 
done often without system or organization. One 
large pioneer family, though not having an organi- 
zation, took their records to the Salt Lake Temple 
and did vicarious work for all their known progeni- 
tors. The very next month descendants of another 
branch of this same family in the St. George region, 
not knowing of the previously completed work, went 
to the St. George Temple and duplicated the temple 
work for every person previously officiated for in 
the Salt Lake Temple. Similar experiences were 
also occurring in other families. To avoid duplication, 
cards have been inaugurated and temple files are 
now systematized. This systematizing came about 
as a result of the Taylor Family organization, through 



Baylor, John; The Gospel Kingdom, Selected and arranged by 
G. Homer Durham, 1943 Edition; Bookcraft Company, Salt Lake City, 
Utah; page 294. 



Constitution 

Passed by family members at reunion 
ARTICLE I 

Name 

The name shall be the PRESIDENT JOHN 
TAYLOR FAMILY. 
Membership 

All who are related to President John Taylor 
by birth or marriage. 

ARTICLE II 

Purpose 

The objects and purposes of this organization are: 

1. To perpetuate the memory of our beloved 
ancestor and to keep alive in our hearts and 
the hearts of our posterity our favored birth- 
right and the obligations attendant thereto. 

2. To foster genealogical research and £emple 
activity. 

3. To provide for an annual reunion on Novem- 
ber 1 or as near that date as feasible. 

ARTICLE III 

Officers 

The business and affairs of this organization 
shall be conducted by the following officers: 

1. A Board of Seven Directors. 

2. A Chairman and members of a permanent 
Genealogical Committee, with its representa- 
tives of the seven different families and the 
general John Taylor line. 

3. Historian. 

4. An Executive Secretary and a Recording 
Secretary. 



one of its members who belonged to our Research 
and Temple Committee. 

Our Research and Temple Committee consists of 
a chairman, a secretary, and one or more representa- 
tives of each of the eight branches in the family. 
This committee meets at regular intervals to hear 
reports of what has been accomplished on each line. 
Donating members are given the privilege of specify- 
ing to which line they wish their donations allocated. 
Most, however, leave this apportionment to the com- 
mittee which usually authorizes the head of the Re- 
search Department to place funds in each separate 
account as needed. In this way duplication has been 
avoided. 

These are the advantages of a Family Organiza- 
tion: It avoids duplication, unifies effort, distributes 
financial burden, excites interest, and gets results. 

Hiring professional researchers has been deemed 
a necessary aid for our lines. The family has been 
long indebted to Brother Archibald Bennett who 
serves as our head researcher. Nettie T. Taylor has 
systematized the Salt Lake Temple card files. 

Library File Reference: Genealogy. 



The out-going chairman of the reunion committee 
shall serve as ex-officio member of the committee 
planning the succeeding year's program. 

The Board of Directors shall be elected for a 
two-year term by the members attending the re- 
union, and shall include a representative of each 
of the seven families. On alternating years, three, 
then four directors shall automatically be released. 
The out-going directors shall serve as a nominating 
committee to appoint the incoming directors, each 
choosing from within his grandmother's line. 

The outgoing directors each year shall serve as 
executive officers for planning that year's party, and 
shall select from their number a chairman. 

For the coming year, the directors to be presented 
for election shall be the group called temporarily to 
organize this year's reunion; and at next year's re- 
union three of them shall be released and shall pre- 
sent names of their successors. 

The directors shall have power to appoint as 
many committees or individuals as necessary to 
carry out a successful and appropriate reunion, and 
to levy costs for same in an equitable manner to be 
shared by all. 

Neither any officer nor any members of the Board 
of Directors shall receive any compensation for their 
services as such. 

ARTICLE IV 

This Constitution may be amended at any annual 
meeting of the membership by a two-thirds vote of 
the members present. 



DECEMBER 1 963 



429 



HOME TEACHING 
ORGANIZATION CHART 



STAKE HOME TEACHING COMMITTEE 

Stake ■ A k , General Secretary a . Assistant Stake Clerk a 
Presidency |\ |\ fl ' for Home Teaching*^ l~ for Home Teaching R 

C'High Councilman member of Melchizedek Priesthood Committee) 



o 



o 



T 



High Priests 
Group Leader 



+ 



Home Teachers 

(High Priests as 
senior companions) 



if 



+ 



Homes of 

High Priests or 

Their Widows 



ftf* 




WARD HOME TEACHING COMMITTEE 



Ward 
Bishopric 



Seventies President 



seventies fresment a 
¥ "f- or Group Leader ff 



+ 



Home Teachers t 

(Seventies as 
senior companions) 



it 



+ 



:m^ 



Homes of 

Seventies or 

Their Widows 



ifii 




+ 



Assistant Ward Clerk 
for Home Teaching 



i 




Home Teachers . • 

(Eiders as flB 
senior companions) |\ /| 



+ 



;: ::s»lS:::s„ |1| 



Homes of 

Elders or 

Their Widows 



ill* 



General Secretary 

-J- of Aaronie 

Priesthood Over 21 



4-" 



Home Teachers 

(Advisors to Aaronie 
Priesthood Members over 
21 as senior companions) 



t 



8»i; .::: " ' " ; :" ■ :■ .:: 






Homes of Aaronie 

Priesthood Over 21 

and Unordained 

or Their Widows 



iff* 



Home Teaching and the Family 



by Richard 0. Cowan 

The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints has stated that: 

. . . The home was [is] the basis of a righteous life 
and that no other instrumentality can take its place 
nor fulfill its essential functions, and that the ut- 
most the auxiliaries can do is to aid the home in its 
problems, giving special aid and succor where such 
is necessary. . . . (The Improvement Era, January, 
1962, page 36.) 

The Priesthood Correlation Program, of which 
Home Teaching is' an important part, has the objec- 
tive of accomplishing the work of the Church in the 
best possible manner. With the elimination of all 
unnecessary duplication and with each part of the 
organization functioning at maximum efficiency 
within its special jurisdiction, the Church will better 
be able to strengthen the home and prepare the 
family for celestial exaltation. 

The Home Teaching Leader's Handbook answers 
the question "What is Home Teaching?" and shows 
how this new program implements the above basic 
principles: 

Home Teaching is the first step in a priesthood 
and home centered program of gospel teaching and 
gospel living. It recognizes the home as the basic 
institution of learning, the family as an eternal unit. 
Through love, selfless service, example, and teaching, 

(For general reading.) 



the Home Teacher represents the bishop with the 
families assigned to him and aims to help build an 
active testimony of the Restored Gospel in each 
individual and greater solidarity in each family. 1 

This is to be a priesthood-centered program. The 
bishop, who is the presiding high priest in the ward, 
will have responsibility for Home Teaching in his 
ward. Working immediately under the direction of 
the bishopric in the Home Teaching program will 
be the leaders of the high priests, seventies, elders, 
and the Aaronie Priesthood. These priesthood lead- 
ers in turn will supervise the labors of the Home 
Teachers who will visit families in their respective 
priesthood groups. Thus the bishop and priesthood 
leaders will work together to accomplish their joint 
responsibility toward members in their jurisdictions. 
Furthermore, quorum presidencies will be in a posi- 
tion to more completely fulfill their assignment to 
sit in council with and teach quorum members. (See 
Doctrine and Covenants 107:89, 90.) 

A Home Teacher senior companion will be se- 
lected from worthy high priests, seventies, or elders. 
His junior companion may be another Melchizedek 
Priesthood bearer, an Aaronie Priesthood bearer, or, 
under certain circumstances, the senior companion's 
wife. Assignments will be made in order to serve 
best the needs of the families to be visited. For 
example, seventies, who have responsibility for 



Worne Teaching Leader's Handbook, 1963 Edition; The Deseret 
News Press, Salt Lake City, Utah; pages A-l and A-4. 



430 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Teachers in the auxiliaries will work through the Ward Council and Home Teachers 
in carrying out the enlistment program. Through the Home Teaching Committee and 
Ward Council, Home Teachers may request assistance from auxiliary officers and 
teachers in working with the home. 



General Secretary 

•^- of Aaronic 

Priesthood 



f 



Leader of Auxiliaries and 
Other Ward Organizations 



Officers and Teachers 



NOTE: In addition to the priest- 
hood leaders, auxiliary leaders 
will assist in the Home Teach- 
ing Program as directed by the 
stake and ward priesthood 
leadership. In cases of special 
need, the bishop will make ad- 
justments in assignments; for 
example, homes of single 
women and single men. 



missionary work, will be assigned to work with and 
fellowship recent converts into the Church. In all 
cases, Home Teachers should approach their fam- 
ilies in a spirit of love and helpfulness. The Home 
Teacher will assume a relationship to his families 
similar to the role the bishop has with respect to 
the ward as a whole. In many instances this will 
involve more than a single routine visit each month; 
the Teachers will have the opportunity of being of 
service to families in specific ways regardless of the 
number of visits required. 

The basic mission of Home Teachers will be to 
teach that through the Gospel of Jesus Christ one 
can achieve perfect and lasting happiness and to 
bear witness that the Gospel and Church have been 
restored in our day. Rather than having a set lesson 
for all, the Home Teacher will vary his message from 
the bishop or priesthood leader to meet the needs of 
each family. 

In addition, the Home Teacher will correlate all 
phases of the Church program as they relate to each 
family. He will do the work formerly done by Ward 
or Branch Teachers, plus making visits as a repre- 
sentative of priesthood leaders, fellowshiping and 
encouraging all into full Church activity, strengthen- 
ing the quality of Gospel teaching in the home, and 
providing a two-way channel of communication be- 
tween the bishop, priesthood leaders, and homes. 
Home Teachers will carry out enlistment work for 
all Church activities. In this way the Sunday School 
and other organizations will have the full resources 
of the priesthood to advance their respective pro- 
grams. 



Home Teaching will be administered in the ward 
by the bishopric and priesthood leaders acting as 
the Ward Home Teaching Committee. The bishop 
will call in heads of other organizations to cooperate; 
this enlarged group will be known as the Ward 
Council. The council may be used by the bishop 
to coordinate activities other than those strictly re- 
lated to Home Teaching. 

According to the Home Teaching Leader's Hand- 
book, a teacher in the Sunday School or in any other 
organization still has the responsibility and oppor- 
tunity to assist an individual class member to more 
fully understand and live the Gospel. The teacher 
will still counsel class members regarding individual 
problems or assignments. When it comes to enlist- 
ment work, however, the teacher should work 
through the ward Sunday School superintendency 
and Ward Council with the Home Teachers, who will 
coordinate the enlistment efforts of all organizations 
interested in individual family members. At the 
same time, Home Teachers, working closely with 
their families, will recognize the families' needs and 
through priesthood leaders and Ward Council call 
upon workers in other organizations for help. Thus, 
the Sunday School teacher will be part of a team, 
with the Home Teacher as key member, interested 
in the individual welfare of each member of the 
Church. 

This is a home-centered program. Parents have 
the prime responsibility to set spiritual goals for the 
family. Home Teachers may assist parents to ap- 
preciate truths of the Gospel and their place in our 
lives. Teachers in turn are backed up by the re- 
sources of the priesthood quorum they represent 
and of the whole Church, all of which are made avail- 
able to help the family fulfill its role as the basic 
unit in the Lord's work. 

President David O. McKay described Home 
Teaching as: 

... A divine service, a divine call. It is our 
duty as Home Teachers to carry the divine spirit 
into every home and heart. To love the work and 
do our best will bring unbounded peace, joy, and 
satisfaction to a noble, dedicated teacher of God's 
children. 2 

Let us, whether Home Teacher or Sunday School 
teacher, learn to work effectively through this new 
program; and let us resolve to do our best with the 
Lord's blessings to help each of His children en- 
trusted in our care to achieve Eternal Life which is 
the greatest of all the gifts of God. 



Worne Tedching Leader's Handbook, preface. 
Library File Reference: Home Teaching. 



DECEMBER 1 963 



431 




*« 



LIFE ETERNAL 

TO KNOW THE ONLY TRUE GOD 



» 



Compiled by Arthur S. Anderson 
and Oscar W. McConkie, Jr.* 



Jesus said: "And this is life eternal, that they 
might know thee the only true God, and Jesus 
Christ, whom thou hast sent." (John 17:3.) To 
truly know Him, we must understand his nature 
and attributes and then alter our lives to become 
like Him. 

The Prophet Joseph Smith realized the impor- 
tance of our knowing the nature and attributes of 
God; therefore, he gave us considerable enlighten- 
ment to help us understand the scriptures pertaining 
to this subject. Some of his sayings are quoted here: 

God Is a Person— He Is the Father of Christ 

"... I saw two Personages, whose brightness and 
glory defy all description, standing above me in the 
air. One of them spake unto me, calling me by name 
and said, pointing to the other — This is My Beloved 
Son. Hear Him!" (Joseph Smith 2:17.) 

God Is a Separate and Distinct Being 

"I have always declared God to be a distinct 
personage, Jesus Christ a separate and distinct per- 
sonage from God the Father, and that the Holy 
Ghost was a distinct personage and a Spirit: and 
these three constitute three distinct personages and 
three Gods." 1 



(For Course 24, lessons of January 19 and 26, "Elohim — God and 
Father"; and for Course 28, lessons of February 2, 9, and 16, "The 
Godhead.") 

Joseph Smith, History of the Church, Volume 6, 1950 Edition; 
Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah; page 474. 



God Had a Father 

"Where was there ever a son without a father? 
And where was there ever a father without first be- 
ing a son? Whenever did a tree or anything spring 
into existence without a progenitor? And every- 
thing comes in this way. Paul says that which is 
earthly is in the likeness of that which is heavenly, 
Hence if Jesus had a Father, can we not believe that 
He had a Father also? I despise the idea of being 
scared to death of such a doctrine, for the Bible 
is full of it." 2 

God Was Once as We Are Now 

"God himself was once as we are now, and is an 
exalted man, and sits enthroned in yonder heaven! 
... .If the veil were rent today, and the great God 
who holds this world in its orbit, and who upholds 
all worlds and all things by His power, was to make 
himself visible . . . you would see him like a man 
in form — like yourselves in all the persons, image, 
and very form as a man; . . ." 3 

God Is the Supreme Being 

"We here observe that God is the only supreme 
governor and independent being in whom all full- 
ness and perfection dwell; who is omnipotent, omni- 

2 Joseph Smith, History of the Church, Volume 6, page 476. 

Moseph Smith, History of the Church, Volume 6, page 305. 

*Brother Arthur S. Anderson, a member of the Monument Park 
West Stake presidency, is vice-president and a director of David W. 
Evans and Associates, a Salt Lake City advertising agency. 

Brother Oscar W. McConkie, Jr., first counselor in the University 
Stake presidency, has authored two text books, The Kingdom of 
God and God and Man. 



432 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



present and omniscient; without beginning of days 
or end of life; and that in Him every good gift and 
every good principle dwell; and that He is the 
Father of lights; in Him the principle of faith dwells 
independently, and He is the object in whom the 
faith of all other rational and accountable beings 
center for life and salvation." 4 

God Is All-Powerful 

"There are two personages who constitute the 
great, matchless, governing, and supreme power over 
all things, by whom all things are created and made, 
whether visible or invisible, whether in heaven, on 
earth, or in the earth, under the earth, or through- 
out the immensity of space. They are the Father 
and the Son — the Father being a personage of spirit, 
glory, and power, possessing all perfection and full- 
ness, the Son, who was in the bosom of the Father, 
a personage of tabernacle, made or fashioned like 
unto a man, or being in the form and likeness of a 
man, or rather man was formed after His likeness 
and in His image; He is also the express image and 
likeness of the Father, . 



"5 



Six Attributes of God 

"We have, in the revelations which He [God] has 
given to the human family, the following account of 
his attributes: 

First — Knowledge. 

Secondly — Faith or power. 

Thirdly — Justice. 

Fourthly — Judgment. 

Fifthly — Mercy. 

And Sixthly— Truth." 

The Character of God 

After quoting scriptures to substantiate his view, 
Joseph Smith summarized as follows: 

"From the foregoing testimonies we learn the 
following things respecting the character of God: 

"First, that He was God before the world was 
created, and the same God that He was after it was 
created. 

"Secondly, that He is merciful and gracious, slow 
to anger, abundant in goodness, and that He was so 
from everlasting, and will be to everlasting. 

"Thirdly, that He changes not, neither is there 
variableness with Him; but that He is the same from 
everlasting to everlasting, being the same yester- 
day, today and forever; and that His course is one 
eternal round, without variation. 

*Joseph Smith, Lectures on Faith, Lecture Second, paragraph 2. 
5 Joseph Smith, Lectures on Faith, Lecture Fifth, paragraph 2. 
9 Joseph Smith, Lectures on Faith, Lecture Fourth, paragraphs 4-10. 



"Fourthly, that He is a God of truth and cannot 
lie. 

"Fifthly, that He is no respecter of persons, but 
in every nation He that fears God and works right- 
eousness is accepted of Him. 

"Sixthly, that He is love." 7 

Attributes of Knowledge and Power Are Essential in God 

"For inasmuch as God possesses the attribute 
knowledge, He can make all things known to His 
saints necessary for their salvation; and as He pos- 
sesses the attribute power, He is able thereby to 
deliver them from the power of all enemies; . 



»8 



God Has a Perfect Understanding of Man 

"The God of heaven, understanding most per- 
fectly the constitution of human nature, and the 
weakness of men, knew what was necessary to be 
revealed, and what ideas must be planted in their 
minds in order that they might be enabled to exer- 
cise faith in Him unto eternal life." 9 

God Teaches Us when We Are Ready To Receive 

"When we understand the character of God, 
and know how to come to Him, He begins to unfold 
the heavens to us, and to tell us all about it. When 
we are ready to come to Him, He is ready to come 

to us." 10 

God Glorified and Exalted through His Children 

The Prophet Joseph Smith said of Jesus: 
"... and when I [Christ] get My kingdom, I 
shall present it to My Father, so that He may ob- 
tain kingdom upon kingdom, and it will exalt Him 
in glory. He will then take a higher exaltation, and 
I [Christ] will take His place, and thereby become 
exalted Myself . . . God is thus glorified and ex- 
alted in the salvation and exaltation of all His chil- 
dren." 11 

God Seeks To Make Us as He Is, so That We 
May Enjoy His Presence 

". . . When he [the Lord] shall appear, the saints 
will be like Him; and if they are not holy, as He is 
holy, and perfect, as He is perfect, they cannot be 
like Him; for no being can enjoy His glory without 
possessing His perfections and holiness, no more than 
they could reign in His kingdom without His pow- 



er 



"12 



7 Joseph Smith, Lectures on Faith, Lecture Third, paragraphs 12-18. 
"Joseph Smith, Lectures on Faith, Lecture Fourth, paragraph 17. 
"Joseph Smith, Lectures on Faith, Lecture Fourth, paragraph 2. 
'"Joseph Smith, History of the Church, Volume 6, page 308. 
"Joseph Smith, History of the Church, Volume 6, page 306. 
'-Joseph Smith, Lectures on Faith, Lecture Seventh, paragraph 10. 
Library File Reference: God. 



DECEMBER 1963 



433 



"NOW I CAN SEE HOW A 
PERSON CAN BE A LEADER 
AND A FOLLOWER AT 
THE SAME TIME." 




Follow 
the Leader 

by Lorna C. Alder* 

"0 Mother!" exclaimed Reed, as he came run- 
ning into the kitchen where his mother was pre- 
paring dinner, "I know a game I'd like to play for 
my birthday party!" 

"What game have you thought of, my dear?" 
"Follow the Leader," replied Reed, with a 
sparkle in his eyes. "I'll be the leader, climb the 
pole, and then slide down. I'll bet no one but me 
can do that!" he exclaimed. 

"Do you think it would be fair to climb the pole 
and have the others try something you know they 
can not do?" asked mother. "You have practiced 
all summer. Your cousin, Tim, is coming. He's only 
three years old, you know. He couldn't climb the 
pole." 

"But Mother, I did want to climb the pole." 
"How would it be to climb the p61e just to show 



(For Course 2, lesson of February 2, "Jesus Is Our Leader"; 
and for Course 7, lesson of December 15, "David O. McKay"; and of 
general interest.) 

♦Sister Lorna C Alder serves as a member of the Deseret Sunday 
School Union Board. 



your friends how strong your arms have grown, but 
not to climb it when you are the leader in play? If 
you are going to be a good leader and have others 
follow you, think carefully before you act," ex- 
plained Mother. 

Reed stood with his head cocked to one side, 
watching the potato peelings fall into the pan on his 
mother's lap. 

"Would the children be happy at your party if 
you were a leader who made them feel like they 
couldn't follow you?" 

"I guess it would be better to get some other 
game," sighed Reed. 

"No, son, you can still play 'Follow the Leader'; 
but when you are the leader, think of those who are 
to follow you and be a very fair leader," suggested 
Mother. 

"There are many good leaders in this world of 
ours," continued Mother. "In this Church we have 
wonderful leaders. I would like you to remember 
that you cannot always be the leader. A good leader 
is first a good follower." 

"I have never thought of that," said Reed, softly. 

"I can think of times when a leader is also a 
follower," said Mother. 

"When would a leader be a follower? Could he 
be a leader and a follower at the same time?" asked 
Reed. 

"Well, son, the bishop is the top leader in our 
ward. He wouldn't be the leader if he didn't follow 
someone else. Can you think who our bishop must 
follow?" 

"Our bishop must do what President David O. 
McKay and the stake president say for him to do." 

"Yes, that is right. Do you know why?" asked 
Mother. 

Reed hesitated, not being sure how to answer. 

"The President of the Church is a Prophet of 
our Heavenly Father. He leads the Church here 
on earth. This is The Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints. Jesus is our leader. He shows 
us what we are to do on this earth. The President 
of the Church must follow Jesus' instructions very 
carefully or he cannot be our leader. The stake 
president follows the directions of the President of 
the Church. We all should follow Jesus; that is, we 
are to live as he taught us to live," explained Mother. 

Reed stood listening as he twisted a long piece 
of string around his fingers. 

"Now I can see how a person can be a leader and 
a follower at the same time." 

"I hope some day you will grow to be a fine 
leader. You must start now by being a good fol- 
lower." 



Library File Reference: Leadership. 



434 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Peace 



S A POWERFUL WORD 



by General Superintendent George R. Hill 

Peace is a wonderful word. Particularly is this 
true if it means peace with perfect freedom of action. 

To achieve such a peace requires effort from all 
of us. 

Peace is made up of a number of factors. The 
violation of any one of these might destroy the peace 
we are seeking. Of all the factors contributing to 
peace the most important is love. 

In Leviticus 19:18 we are told by the Lord, ". . . 
thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the 
Lord." A lawyer who desired to trap Jesus asked, 

. . . Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? 
[Jesus] said unto him, What is written in the 
law? how readest thou? 

And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord 
thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, 
and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; 
and thy neighbour as thyself. 

And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: 
this do, and thou shalt live. 

But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus, 
And who is my neighbour? 

And Jesus answering said, A certain man went 
down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among 
thieves, which stripped him of his raiment, and 
wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead. 

And by chance there came down a certain priest 
that way: and when he saw him, he passed by on 
the other side. 

And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, 
came and looked on him, and passed by on the other 
side. 

But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came 
where he was: and when he saw him, he had com- 
passion on him, 

And went to him, and bound up his wounds, 
pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own 



beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care 
of him. 

And on the morrow when he departed, he took 
out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said 
unto him, Take care of him; and whatsoever thou 
spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee. 

Which now of these three, thinkest thou, was 
neighbour unto him that fell among the thieves? 

And he said, He that shewed mercy on him. Then 
said Jesus unto him, Go, and do thou likewise. 
(Luke 10:25-37.) 

The late Thomas E. McKay summed up how we 
can attain the true spirit of "on earth peace, good 
will toward men" in these convincing words: 

"Only love can bring peace. Anyone who per- 
mits himself to hate any person or any people 
makes his own small but vital contribution towards 
discord and trouble, while he who seeks to love 
others, even his enemies, makes his own priceless 
contribution to peace. True lasting peace, when it 
comes to the world, will be made up of many trick- 
lets of love flowing from the hearts of the people to 
a common understanding and a common goal. The 
gift of peace on earth and good will to men was 
offered to the world in the gospel of living taught 
by the Saviour in his earthly ministry. He made 
love of God and love of mankind fundamental and 
declared 'On these two commandments hang all 
the law and the prophets.' The power of love alone 
can permanently disarm the world." 

Klimov, on the other hand, has aptly described 
the "terror machine" operating in Russia and her 
satellites in which suspicion, hate, and ruthless 
"vanishing-without-trace" tactics dominate her cow- 
ering subjects — the very antithesis of love, peace, 
serenity. 

If we want peace, we must develop love for all 
our Father's children. 



(For Christmas lessons; and for Course 8, lesson of March 1, 
"A Man of Peace.") 



Library File Reference: Peace. 



DECEMBER 1963 



435 



SECOND IN A SERIES OF TWELVE ARTICLES 
TO SUPPORT THE GOSPEL DOCTRINE COURSE 

JESUS THE CHRIST 



by Lowell L. Bennion 



THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD 

Lesson 5, Feb. 2, 1964 
Chapter 25, pages 407-412 

Note for Teachers: Each chapter in Jesus the Christ is 
so rich in subject matter that it contains five to ten possible 
lessons. In fact every parable and nearly each saying of the 
Saviour's is worthy of a full hour's discussion or more. 
This creates a problem for teachers who can spend only two 
or three Sundays on a chapter. 

A good lesson — like a good talk — is one idea, organized 
and illustrated and of vital meaning in the lives of class 
members. The purpose of each Sunday School class is not 
to teach a book but to help students feel, think about, and 
live a great idea as taught by the Saviour. 

Therefore, we suggest that the teacher find one signif- 
icant idea needed by his students each Sunday and build 
his lesson around it. Other ideas in the chapter which 
cannot be related to the major theme of the day are best 
left to another Sunday or to the reading of the student. 
Each person should take home with him a significant and 
moving idea each Sunday. The purpose of this supple- 
mentary material in The Instructor is to suggest and focus 
upon just such an idea. 

Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying, I am 
the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not 
walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life. 
(John 8:12.) 

DURING the Feast of the Tabernacles and in 
the Court of Women where Jesus spoke these 
words, there were two large golden candlesticks with 
lighted candles burning at least part of the time. 
Jesus took advantage of the situation and called 
Himself "the light of the world" and "the light of 
life." 

Question: 

In what sense could Christ call Himself the light of the 
world? 

In a very real and literal sense Jesus Christ, the 
Son of God, is the light of the world and of life. 
This is made clear in the Gospel of John, chapter 1, 
in Moses 1, and in the Doctrine and Covenants 88: 
1-13 and 93:1-20. From these we learn that Christ 
was a God before He was ever born in the flesh, and 
that through Him the Father created worlds without 
number as well as our own, in order ". . . to bring to 
pass the immortality and eternal life of man." (Moses 
1:39.) The light of the sun, the moon, and the 

(For Course 26, lessons of February 2, 9, 16, and 23, "Jesus Again 
in Jerusalem," and "Our Lord's Ministry in Perea and Judea"; and 
Course 28, lesson of March 8, "Free Agency.") 



stars is the work of Deity; it reflects divine intelli- 
gence. Likewise the pulsating and moving power of 
human intelligence is quickened and sustained by 
the light of Christ and the Father in whom ". . . we 
live, and move, and have our being; . . ." (Acts 
17:28.) 

". . . Before Abraham was, I am." (John 8:58.) 
Jesus was fully conscious of His position in relation 
to the Father and to men. In the pre-earth life He 
was the Firstborn, the eldest son of God, elder 
brother to Abraham, and the Creator and Redeemer 
of Abraham as well as of all men. 

He has come to share so fully in the fullness of 
the Father that the Light of Christ and the Spirit 
of God are used quite synonymously in the Scrip- 
tures. (See Doctrine and Covenants 93:1-20.) 

And the light which shineth, which giveth you 
light, is through him who enlighteneth your eyes, 
which is the same light that quickeneth your under- 
standings; Which light proceedeth forth from the 
presence of God to fill the immensity of space. 
(Doctrine and Covenants 88:11, 12.) 

The Light of Christ is given to every child born 
into the world to quicken his mind and to attract 
him to goodness and truth. (Read Moroni 7.) 

Question: 

In what kind of darkness do you and I walk? 

In the light of the sun by day and the moon and 
stars by night, the Creator has provided us with 
ample natural light. Man's darkness lies within him 
— in his ignorance and sin. These are the basic 
sources of nearly all, if not all, of his darkness. 

Ignorance is lack of awareness of things as they 
are, were, and will be. Sin is the willful or knowing 
failure to live in harmony with the knowledge we 
do have. Ignorance and sin together keep us out 
of harmony with life and its Creator. 

Christ lived, taught, and died to remove the 
darkness of ignorance and sin from our lives. 

Questions: 

1. In what ways has Christ led us out of ignorance? 
Illustrate. 



436 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



2. Which of His teachings have brought light into our 
lives? Illustrate. 

3. Of what sins has Christ made us aware? 

4. How has He ever provided us with the strength to 
overcome sins? (Note Alma 34:14-17.) 

Behold, now are we the sons of God, and it doth 
not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, 
when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we 
shall see him as he is. 

And every man that hath this hope in him purifieth 
himself, even as he is pure. 

Whosoever abideth in him sinneth not: whosoever 
sinneth hath not seen him, neither known him. 
(Uohn 3:2, 3, 6,) 

Assignment: 

John 8:12 and following verses, and John 9. 
Question: 

From what does Christ make us free now? 



AND THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE 

Lesson 6, Feb. 9, 1964 
Chapter 25, pages 412-419 

. . . If ye continue in my word, then are ye my 
disciples indeed; and ye shall know the truth, and 
the truth shall make you free. (John 8:31, 32.) 

WHAT a glorious promise! What did the Sav- 
iour mean and how may the promise be ful- 
filled in our lives? First, we must try to distinguish 
between free agency and freedom. According to the 
Restored Gospel, we all have free agency; but men 
vary greatly in the kinds and degrees of freedom 
which they enjoy. 

Free agency is inherent in man's uncreated, eter- 
nal intelligence. 

Man was also in the beginning with God. Intelli- 
gence, or the light of truth, was not created or made, 
neither indeed can be. All truth is independent in 
that sphere in which God has placed it, to act for 
itself, as all intelligence also; otherwise there is no 
existence. (Doctrine and Covenants 93:29, 30.) 

The Father and Son have great respect for the 
free agency of men. A war in heaven was fought 
over man's right to preserve and exercise his agency. 
The whole Gospel plan presupposes and respects the 
free agency of each individual. Without this the 
Gospel plan would lose most of its meaning. 

Freedom is dependent upon free agency, but it is 
not quite the same. Free agency is a capacity of 
the mind which we bring with us into mortality. 
Freedom, on the other hand, is earned, learned, de- 
veloped and achieved. It is accurate to say that 
all men of normal mental functioning are free 
agents; but it is not accurate to say that all men are 
free. Freedom is not something vague, general, ab- 



*For views on free agency and predestination see "The Challenge 
of Free Agency," by Charles H. Monson, page 424. 



stract, or ethereal. Freedom is specific, concrete, 
definite. In other words, we have specific freedoms 
or we do not have them. 

For example, East Germans have as much free 
agency as West Germans, but they do not have 
the same freedoms. West Germans may leave their 
country; East Germans leave only at the risk of 
being shot. 

Christ came — not to give us free agency — but 
to make us more free. This He can do with our 
help, for He said, "// ye continue in my word, then 
are ye my disciples indeed; and ye shall know the 
truth and the truth shall make you free." Let us 
suggest how He can do this. 

On a blank piece of paper (or on the chalkboard) 
we can list many things from which we would be 
free. 

Things from Which I Would Be Free: » 

Fear of death 

Covetousness (be specific) 

Envy 

Hate 

Lust 

Sense of failure 

Sense of guilt 

Anger 

Indulgence 
food 
drink 
TV 

Discord in marriage in the family- 
Keeping up with the Joneses 

(Choose any one of these in turn and ask how disciple- 
ship of Christ can made us free. Illustrate any past suc- 
cesses of our own or others through Christ.) 

Things Which Christ Could Free Me To Do: 

Accept myself 

Lose myself 

Get along better with others 

Find trust in God 

Live for things that matter most 

Illustrate how Christ could help us to do or to 
be something we wish to do or become in one of 
these specific ways. 

To have a meaningful place in our lives and in 
our salvation, Jesus Christ must be taken out of the 
scriptures and out of the clouds and be brought 
more intimately into our daily living. 



BLINDNESS 

Lesson 7, Feb. 16, 1964 
Chapter 26, pages 423-429 

. . . Master, who did sin, this man, or his parents, 
that he was born blind? (John 9:2.) 

THIS simple inquiry by Jesus' disciples raises 
several important theological issues. (1) The 
disciples recognized the possibility that the blind 
man, himself, had sinned. If so, it would have had 
to have been either in his mother's womb or in a 



DECEMBER 1963 



437 



JESUS THE CHRIST (Continued.) 

pre-mortal state. The former is certainly a most 
unlikely explanation from our logic and perspective 
today. (2) A second issue raised by this question 
has to do with parental responsibility for the mis- 
fortunes of their children. Was the child born blind 
because the parents had sinned? This was an an- 
cient teaching among the Jews: ". . . for I the Lord 
thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of 
the fathers upon the children unto the third and 
fourth generation of them that hate me." (Exodus 
20:5.) 

Jesus denied both of these explanations of the 
child's blindness when He said: 

. . . Neither hath this man sinned, nor his par- 
ents: but that the works of God should be made 
manifest in him. (John 9:3.) 

Then Jesus proceeded to manifest the power 
and mercy of God by restoring the man's sight. 
Some people have made a universal explanation from 
this incident by suggesting that all human suffering 
is God-willed to glorify His holy name. 

There is no greater problem in theology or in 
life than to find an explanation for the great amount 
of human suffering which seems to be experienced in 
such unequal and undeserved proportions. This is 
the basic issue of the Book of Job, which the author 
leaves unresolved except to encourage the reader to 
acknowledge his ignorance and to put faith in the 
ways of Him who created all things. 

Though we concede that man cannot from his 
limited perspective understand life and the ways of 
the Creator very fully, it is important that he not 
be guided by error. Jesus does make clear some 
things about human suffering. 

(1) All human suffering does not result from sin. 
When we see a human being, blind or otherwise 
handicapped in mortality, how unwise and judg- 
mental to conclude that he was a sinner either in 
this life or in a premortal state! On several occasions 
Jesus said things which would lead us to believe 
otherwise. 

There were present at that season some that 
told him of the Galilaeans, whose blood Pilate had 
mingled with their sacrifices. And Jesus answering 
said unto them, Suppose ye that these Galilaeans 
were sinners above all the Galilaeans, because they 
suffered such things. I tell you, Nay: . . . (Luke 
13:1-3.) 

On another occasion when He was persuading 
His followers to love even their enemies, He said 
of the Father, 

. . . for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and 
on the good, and sendeth the rain on the just and 
on the unjust. (Matthew 5:45.) 

He concluded the Sermon on the Mount in the 




Christ healing the blind. 

same vein when he observed that ". . . the rain 
descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, 
and beat upon" both houses — the one built upon 
a rock as well as the one built upon sand — or on 
the life built upon his sayings and the one not so 
built. We suffer because of our sins, to be sure, but 
we also suffer from the sins of others and from the 
physical and natural forces which we meet in mortal 
life. All suffering is not the result of personal sin. 

(2) Children also suffer because of the sins of 
their parents and sometimes this suffering continues 
through many generations. Parents who create evil 
environments for their children either through ignor- 
ance or sin can cause much suffering. This is a 
natural consequence. But the notion that God would 
punish children directly to revenge Himself on their 
parents or forebears is utterly false. This violates 
too many fundamentals of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. 
God is merciful, loving, impartial, and just. And He 
respects free agency, believing that man should be 
punished for his own sins and not for Adam's or 
any other man's sins. (This is taught emphatically 
by the prophet Ezekiel in Ezekiel 18.) 

There is a blindness even more common and more 
tragic than physical blindness. The great bulk of 



438 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



John, Chapter 9, illustrates this spiritual blindness 
which characterized the lives of some Pharisees who 
witnessed the miracle of Jesus healing the blind 
man. Their minds were closed to truth. They were 
guarding the letter of the law and not rejoicing in 
the presence of one who could bring light into the 
eyes and hearts of men. Not one apparently re- 
joiced to witness a man see for the first time in his 
life. Christ's very presence revealed their blindness 
and convicted them in their sin. (See John 9:41.) 

Questions: 

1. What are your possible and tentative explanations 
of human suffering? 

2. Why were the Pharisees so hostile towards Jesus? 

3. Name some prejudices harbored by us. 

4. How can they be removed? 

5. Do we share any reasons with the Pharisees for not 
following the Good Shepherd more earnestly? 



WHO IS MY NEIGHBOR? 

Lesson 8, Feb. 23, 1964 
Chapter 26, pages 429-441 

AT this time in His ministry, Jesus seems to have 
said farewell to His native Galilee and turned 
His face towards Jerusalem. Rejection, hatred, and 
death lay ahead and near at hand. Yet despite these 
harsh and cruel expectations, Jesus remained calm 
and serene, and His acts were motivated by increased 
love for His enemies. His concern for the salvation 
of men moved Him to send out the Seventy and to 
rejoice in the degree of success which they reported. 
As He and His disciples passed through Samaria and 
were treated with disrespect, James and John asked 
that they might call down fire from heaven and con- 
sume them. But Jesus rebuked them, saying: 

. . . Ye know not what manner of spirit ye are of. 
For the Son of man is not come to destroy men's 
lives, but to save them. . . . (Luke 9:55, 56.) 

In the parable of the Good Samaritan, Jesus con- 
tinues His teaching of love, clothing it in unfor- 
gettable imagery. The setting of the parable greatly 
enriches its force. (Read Luke 10:25-37.) On half 
a page, in beautiful, vivid language, Jesus paints a 
picture beloved by Christians through the ages. As 
we read the parable again, we note how each verse 
is full of action: significant things happen to people 
which stimulate the imagination, mind, and heart. 

Questions: 

1. What are the specific teachings of this parable to us? 

2. Why, do we suppose, did the priest and Levite pass 
by the man who fell among thieves? 

3. Who were the Samaritans? 

4. Why did Jesus have a Samaritan render assistance? 

5. Who is the good neighbor? 

Someone has said that it is easy enough to love 
all men; the difficulty arises when we must specialize 

DECEMBER 1963 



and love the individuals we meet. Napoleon may 
have felt great affection for his troops as a body, 
but Abraham Lincoln suffered with and for the in- 
dividual soldier and his mother. Jesus' love of men 
was not in the abstract and general, but real and 
towards individuals — the woman accused of adultery, 
the Samaritans refusing Him hospitality, little chil- 
dren, the man born blind from birth. 

In the parable under consideration, Jesus not 
only reiterated the primacy of the first two com- 
mandments, but He illustrated the Second Com- 
mandment and concluded by saying: ". . . Go, and 
do thou likewise." (Luke 10:37.) 

Questions: 

1. Are we ever guilty of the attitude of the priest and 
Levite? Illustrate. (Note Luke 18:9-14.) 

2. Who in our community "has fallen among thieves" 
and is most in need of mercy? Be specific. List 
categories on the chalkboard. 

3. What are we doing now to help such people? 

4. What could we do? 

5. Read President Hugh B. Brown's statement on civil 
rights in his conference tal": Sunday morning, Oct. 
6, 1963. What are we to do about it in our com- 
munity, state, or country? 

Many of us feel that we love our neighbor when 
we "love" those who love us, our kinfolk, friends, 
and associates. Jesus said, however: 

For if ye love them which love you, what reward 
have ye? do not even the publicans the same? And 
if ye salute your brethren only, what do ye more 
than others? do not even the publicans so? (Mat- 
thew 5:46,47.) 

. . . Love your enemies, bless them that curse 
you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for 
them which despitefully use you, and persecute you; 
that ye may be children of your Father which is in 
heaven. . . . (Matthew 5:44, 45.) 

Christ calls us to love each and all men, not 
simply those whom we like and who like us. In 
the deep Christian sense, if we do not love all men, 
we may well love no man, because Christian love 
is impartial, universal, and utterly gracious, seeking 
no reciprocation. 

Love is a commandment of God and His Son. 
It is also a law of life on which human survival and 
salvation depend. The 
realities of the present 
world situation and the 
teachings of our be- 
loved Saviour and our 
own deepest spiritual 
need all bid us follow 
the Good Samaritan: 
"Go, and do thou like- 
wise." 



Library File Reference: 

Jesus Christ. 




Lowell L. Bennion 



439 




WHAT SHALL I DO 

WHEN MY CHILD IS 

NOT ACCEPTED 

BY HIS PLAYMATES??? 

by Reed H. Bradford 




JOHN was nine years of age. In many ways he was 
an accomplished child. He had learned to read 
well; his ability in arithmetic was above average; 
and, when asked to perform in front of audiences 
such as those found in his school class or Sunday 
School, he had done so with poise. His relationship 
with his parents was warm. He was able to talk 
with each of them and explain his feelings on many 
things. 

In one way or another the parents and John 
often expressed their love for one another. They 
tried to help him grow from within. They dedi- 
cated themselves to the idea that one should do 
the right things for the right reasons. To accom- 
plish this end, they regularly explained the prin- 
ciples of the Gospel to John and to their other 
children. They took advantage of "teaching mo- 
ments," occasions which arise in normal daily living 
which furnish an opportunity to help a child gain 
a better understanding of some principle or idea. 

John occupied a middle position in a family of 
seven children. Three children were older and three 
were younger than he. His relationship with the 
older children was not ideal. They unduly criticized 
him and at times were guilty of "taking out" on him 
some of their own frustrations. He was very sensi- 
tive and was often given to crying when associating 
with them. He even cried when his young brothers 
and sister mistreated him or prevented him from 
achieving his goals. Once in awhile he fought back, 
but generally he did not. 

He got along well with girls his own age. They 
played well together; he was sensitive to their feel- 
ings and was not rough with them. One girl espe- 
cially who had lived in the neighborhood most of 
John's life became an intimate pal. 

His Troubles Began in the Second Grade 

His first year in school had presented no appar- 
ent, unusual problems. But during the second year, 

(For Course 24, generally; and for parents.) 



trouble began. Three boys in his class one day ob- 
served him crying on an occasion when he had had 
difficulty in carrying out one of the teacher's assign- 
ments. They teased him about it and succeeded in 
getting him to cry again. From that time on, they 
took delight in making life miserable for him. They 
would wait for him after school and call him a "baby" 
and a "sissy." In school, Sunday School, and Pri- 
mary they made unpleasant remarks about him in 
whispered tones. Sometimes they would trip him 
as he walked down the aisle or throw snowballs at 
him as he was going to and from school. 

Gradually school, Primary, and Sunday School 
became a nightmare for him. He liked his teachers 
and several children his own age, but the three boys 
presented a problem he could not solve. By the 
time he was in the fourth grade he could not stand 
up to his tormentors. He began to develop digestive 
troubles, and he often cried himself to sleep. He 
reached the point where he would cry as he awoke 
in the morning, and throughout the day he was 
often sad and silent. He finally began to isolate 
himself not just from the three boys, but from boys 
in general. 

What Would You Do? 

What would you do if this boy were your son? 
His own parents spent considerable time thinking 
and praying about it. They did the following things. 

They reassured their son of their love for him 
and that they could best show that love by helping 
him grow not only physically, but mentally, emo- 
tionally, socially, and spiritually. 

They wanted him to be able to develop his own 
resources. Since crying in public by boys is gen- 
erally frowned upon in the society in which boys 
live, they tried to help John develop other ways of 
reacting. They knew he felt insecure, so they aided 
him in acquiring additional skills. They assisted 
with the purchase of a bicycle. (He earned part of 
the money.) His father taught him how to play 



440 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



THIRTY-NINTH IN A SERIES ON GOSPEL TEACHING IN THE HOME 



baseball and how to bowl. They spent many hours 
in a swimming pool while John learned to swim. 
They discussed with him the need of becoming a 
friend to others. 

John's parents made an effort to bring new in- 
sights to the "tormentors." They talked with these 
boys and with their parents to show the boys how 
they would feel in John's position. These boys were 
invited to social gatherings in John's home. 

Many discussions were held with all the children 
in the home. This helped all of them to learn the 
meaning of love. The children were complimented 
whenever they unselfishly did something for one an- 
other. When they were unkind, they were asked 
how they would feel had the same unkindness been 
shown to them. John's problem was presented to 
his brothers and sisters (those old enough to have 
some understanding for it), and they were asked to 
help him overcome it. 

John's teachers in various organizations were 
asked to help. They responded by promising (1) 
to guard against unwarranted teasing and similar 
behavior toward him and (2) to aid him in gaining 
increased skill in activity with others. 

John's parents sought professional advice about 
human relations. Those skilled in this field fur- 
nished many helpful insights. 

Finally, the family tried to maximize spirituality 
in their home. They prayed for help and did their 
best to find answers to their own prayers. They ap- 
pealed for inspiration and studied the principles of 
the Gospel with a special aim of learning how they 
might be applied in ways which would help their 
son and brother solve his problem. 

Progress Is Slow 

John is making slow progress. He is no longer 
quite so sad, and he no longer has the same appre- 
hension about going to school. He does have addi- 
tional skills and derives a feeling of pride and satis- 



faction from them. He is learning to play with a 
few boys in his neighborhood, at school, and in 
Church organizations. He seems to have a deeper 
understanding of his problem and is able to talk 
about it without being nearly so upset. He is very 
much aware that his parents love him, and he finds 
ways to demonstrate his appreciation. He has 
learned to appeal to his Heavenly Father in more 
mature ways. 

He still has setbacks, and there are times in 
which he still cries; but it is nearly always by him- 
self. The last three years have been trying ones; 
but he has made progress, and the chances seem 
good that continued progress will be made. For 
such an achievement, all who were involved in find- 
ing a solution to this problem can feel good. 



Library File Reference : Family Life. 



Suggested Agenda for Home Evening 

Prayer. 

Hymn: "Love at Home," Hymns — Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints, No. 169. Family. 

Discussion: What each family member has learned in 
some organization of the Church during the week 
and how he will apply it in his life. 

Lesson: Let each member of the family read the first 
part of the article. Then let each person indicate 
what he or she would do to solve the problem. 

Discuss the things that were done in John's 
home. What other things might the parents have 
done to help their son solve his problem? What 
might his brothers and sisters have done to aid him? 

Do you think the parents should have gone di- 
rectly to the three boys who were teasing their son 
and told them to stop immediately? Give reasons 
for your answer. 

Song: Choose one you think is appropriate. Perhaps 
some member of the family plays the piano. Let 
him or her play a number. 

Scripture Memorization: 

Verily, verily, I say unto you, I will impart unto 
you of my Spirit, which shall enlighten your mind, 
which shall fill your soul with joy. 

(Doctrine and Covenants 11: 13.) 

Closing prayer. 



PHOTO AND ART CREDITS 



Lucien Bown — front cover. 
Photo subjects are Tanya Hansen 
(inside); singers, left to right, are 
Robert Thompson, Rickey Dyches, 
Tommy Dyches, Dixie Lynn Soren- 
son, Patty Puzey, Joan Taylor, and 
Karen Reynolds; all of Chester 
Ward, Moroni Stake. 

Dale Kilbourn: art— 417, 434, 440. 

Deseret News: photos — 421, 439. 

Ed Maryon: art— 422. 



Sherman Martin: art — 428, 436, 453, Virginia Sargent: art — 443. 



layouts. 

Courtesy of John and Mable Ringling 
Museum of Art: painting — 438. 

Bill Johnson: art— 426, 442, 468, out- 
side back cover. 

Ernst Zimmermann: painting — center 
spread. 

Ernest Norman: painting — picture story 
miniatures. 



Leland VanWagoner: photo — 445. 
Photo subjects are Mrs. Grace Bow- 
man, Yale Ward, Bonneville Stake; 
and her granddaughter, Yvonne Tay- 
lor, daughter of Glenn N. and Elaine 
Taylor, Valley View 2nd Ward, Val- 
ley View Stake. 

H. Armstrong Roberts: photo — 449. 

Charles J. Jacobsen: art — inside front 
and back covers. 



DECEMBER 1963 



441 



^np WAS the day before Christmas, a long time ago, 
JL And our beautiful earth was all covered with 
snow; 
Down the street with their sleighs came two manly 

boys, 
Who paused at the window to look at the toys. 
Already two others were there looking in; 
But their faces were sad, and their clothes old and 

thin. 
And the little one said, "Is it because we're so poor 
That Santa doesn't come to our house any more?" 
The older one patted his wee brother's head, 
And hugged him up closely, as softly he said: 
"Oh, maybe he will come tonight, little Tim, 
If we ask in our prayers for the Lord to send him!" 
The little face smiled, but the boys saw a tear 
In the eye of the one who quelled little Tim's fear. 
Then slowly and sadly the waifs went their way 
To the place they called home, where that night 

they would pray. 
The boys, with their sleighs, followed closely behind, 
And neither one spoke, but in each childish mind 
A beautiful thought said as plain as could be: 
"I'll share with those poor boys what Santa brings 

me." 



True 
Christmas 



When the two reached their home, to their father 

they ran, 
And eagerly told him their unselfish plan. 
He was proud of his boys, who now felt that same love 
That sent our dear Saviour from His home above. 
Next morning, still filled with their beautiful thought, 
They scampered downstairs to see what Santa'd 

brought, 
And they, with the help of their father and mother, 
Selected the presents for Tim and his brother. 
And as the first light of dawn came into view 
The two went their way with the toys bright and new, 
And crept very quietly up to the door 
Where they'd seen the boys enter the evening before. 
As they hurried back home toward their own Christ- 
mas joys, 
They could not even dream how the other two boys, 
On finding that Santa had really been there, 
Sent their joy to the One who had answered their 

prayer. 
That night, when the "Santas" were ready for bed, 
With a hand of their father on each curly head, 
They knew, as they thought of two poor, happy boys, 
What's the truest and choicest of all Christmas joys. 1 

'Reprinted at the request of Superintendent George R. Hill from 
The Juvenile Instructor, December, 1914. 

♦Sister Jennette McKay Morrell is the sister of President David 
O. McKay. 
Library File Reference: Christmas. 




by Jennette McKay MorreW^ 



And as the first light of dawn came into view 

The two went their way with the toys bright and new, 

And crept very quietly up to the door 

Where they'd seen the boys enter the evening before. 



442 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— I Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— I Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— I Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— I Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— I Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— 1 Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— I Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— J Samuel 16:17-19, 21, 23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 




David before Saul 





David before Saul 



David before Saul 





David before Saul 



David before Saul 





David before Saul 



David before Saul 



Christ and the Fishermen 

by F. Donald Isbell 

THE STORY 

For the men seen with Christ in the foreground of the picture, the morning 
is well along. But the day — a day they will not forget — is only beginning as they 
intently share with their Lord a most dramatic moment preceded by a miraculous 
event. Though their eyes show strain and tension from several hours' hard labor 
up to the moment at hand, and because of a little while of great excitement, these 
Galilean fishermen reveal a singleness of childlike disposition in their impressions 
of what the Saviour has just accomplished with them and what he is now saying. 

Prior to the moment in which we see them, they had labored through a miser- 
able night as fishermen in their trade. Simon Peter and his brother, Andrew, had 
not caught any fish; and James and John, the sons of Zebedee, who were partners 
with Simon and Andrew, also were without success. Finally they brought their 
ships to shore, disembarked, and began washing and mending their nets. It so hap- 
pened that Jesus, pressed about by a multitude of people wanting to hear more of 
his words, stood by the lake. 1 

John and Andrew, who had once been disciples of John the Baptist, had con- 
sequently acquainted themselves with Jesus (whom the Baptist had declared to be 
"the Lamb of God"), and had brought Simon to meet Jesus, to whom Jesus added 
the name "Peter." 2 Thus it was that Simon Peter, Andrew, and John knew and 
were known by the Master 3 as He looked upon their two ships at the beach of the 
lake and the fishermen washing and mending their nets nearby. 

Jesus entered into Simon's ship and sat down, asking Simon to come and push 
the ship out a little from the land. Presumably with his brother Andrew and as- 
sistants, Simon complied — this company then remaining aboard while Jesus 
taught the multitude gathered on the shore. As soon as Jesus finished speaking to 
the multitude, he requested of Simon: "Launch out into the deep, and let down 
your nets for a draught." (Luke 5:4.) 

Evidently Simon had given no prior indication to Jesus that the night of fish- 
ing had been one of failure and that they did not intend to go out again that day; 
for he replied to the Lord's request, ". . . Master, we have toiled all the night, and 
have taken nothing: nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net." (Luke 5:5.) 
In this logical, respectful, 4 but perhaps doubtful manner, Simon seemed now to 
be indicating strongly that he and the other fishermen had passed a long, frustrat- 
ing night, that they had no hope of catching anything that day, that they were 
weary and preferred not to tire themselves more by fishing again, but that he 
nevertheless would try again, if for nothing more than to please the Master. 

Of the sudden and wonderful occurrence that followed, the scriptures tell us: 

And when they had this done, they inclosed a great multitude of 
fishes: and their net brake. 

And they beckoned unto their partners, which were in the other ship, 
that they should come and help them. And they came, and filled both 
the ships, so that they began to sink. 

When Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus' knees, saying, De- 
part from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord. 

For he was astonished, and all that were with him, at the draught of 
the fishes which they had taken: 

And so was also James, and John, the sons of Zebedee, which were 
partners with Simon. . , . (Luke 5:6-10.) 

Returning now to the scene depicting Christ and the fishermen, we see An- 
drew standing behind and to the right of Jesus, leaning slightly forward, observing 
as Jesus, his hands placed on Simon Peter's left hand and arm to comfort and im- 
press him, says, ". . . Fear not; from henceforth thou shalt catch men." (Luke 5:10.) 

(For Course 10, lesson of April 5, "The First Disciples"; for Course 12, lesson of February 9, "Fishers of Men"; 
for Course 14, lesson of March 15, "The Call and the Ministry of the Twelve"; and for general interest.) 

1 Talmage, James E., Jesus the Christ, 1957 edition, Deseret Book Company, Salt Lake City, Utah; page 197. 

2 Talmage, James E., Jesus the Christ, pages 139, 140. 

3 Talmage, James E., Jesus the Christ, pages 197, 198. 

4 Talmage, James E., Jesus the Christ, page 71 (note 3). 

(Concluded on opposite back of picture.) 






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CHRIST 
AND THE 
FISHERMEN 



From a Painting by 
Ernst Zimmermann 



Reproduced for The Instructor 

by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 



Christ and the Fishermen 

THE STORY (Concluded) 

Simon, in red apparel, still holding the net in his hands, regards Christ in' 
tenth/ as James, directly behind Simon, and John, looking very young, gaze with 
grave and searching awe into the Master's eyes. Through "all the night" they had 
caught nothing; yet one draught of fish that their Lord had guided them to catch 
had filled and begun to sink both ships. To them, this was a miracle. This was, in 
fact, what men call a miracle. But for what purpose? Being provided by the Lord, 
could the purpose be anything but divine? 

So as not to lose the catch, they labored rapidly, diligently, and with great 
effort to bring in the sudden "multitude of fishes." Hence — considering each fish 
to be of true value — as surely as they had been fishers of fish, they were to be- 
come fishers of men. 

Wrote James E. Talmage, in his inspired work, Jesus the Christ, ". . . the 
briefer and less circumstantial accounts given by Matthew and Mark omit the in- 
cident of the miraculous draught of fishes, and emphasize the calling of the fisher- 
men." 5 " 'Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men,' " said Jesus to fishermen 
who afterward became His apostles (Matthew 4:19). Mark's version is nearly the 
same. . . ." 6 ". . . The contrast thus presented between their former vocation and 
their new calling is strikingly forceful. Theretofore they had caught fish, and the 
fate of the fish was death; thereafter, they were to draw men — to a life eternal." 7 

In the Book of Acts are found many examples of the work that was forthcom- 
ing from the fishermen as fishers of men. One example is described in the Scrip- 
tures as follows: "Then they that gladly received the word were baptized: and the 
same day there were added unto them about three thousand souls." (Acts 2:41.) 

One might wonder, however, in reflection, how great the miraculous draught 
of fishes was to the fishermen in terms of what they would receive for selling that 
enormous quantity of fish. Did they consider Christ's provision as a happy material 
adjustment to their daily living expenses, or did they think otherwise? 

The scriptures conclude the incident, not without a quirk of irony, in this 
manner: 

"And when they had brought their ships to land, they forsook all, and fol- 
lowed him." (Luke 5:11.) 



5 Talmage, James E., Jesus the Christ, page 198. 

6 Talmage, James E., Jesus the Christ, page 201 (note 4). 

7 Talmage, James E., Jesus the Christ, pages 198-199. 

THE PICTURE 

Christ and the Fishermen was painted by Ernst Zimmermann, a German 
painter of the 19th century. The work is realistic in all respects. As to color, the 
saturated blue — tinted in places — of Christ's robe, rather than being a forced 
shade of blue, seems to be an ordinarily deep, effortless shade; whereas, the blue 
of the sea, much less tinted than that of the sky, and the vapid blue of the sky, 
very tinted, allow for the robe to serve its intended predominance. The same can 
be said of the red color of Peter's clothing, as in comparison with the robe of 
Christ, except for the brilliance of the red. All the colors back of Simon and 
Christ, save for the faces of the other fishermen, are blended, saturated, or tinted 
variously, to provide a natural yet concentrated attraction of the viewer to Simon 
and Christ. 

The painting seems impressionistic, as though Zimmermann himself had been 
there at the scene and later painted as he remembered. 

There is an unmistakable intensity in the expressions of Peter, James, and 
John. Added to this emphasis, Andrew (standing), on the other hand, appears to 
be more concerned about Simon Peter than attentive to the matter of the moment, 
and thus is a little withdrawn from Christ's communication. Intended or unin- 
tended by the painter, the unity of Peter, James, and John — accentuated by 
Andrew's distraction — brings to mind the united authority and solidarity which 
the three were to share in their work of saving men, (See Galatians 2:9), and in 
organizing and establishing the system for that, under Christ — both in former and 
in latter days. 1 



1 (a) Smith, Joseph Fielding, and McConkie, Biuce R., (compiler); Doctrines of Salvation, Volume III; 1956 edition; 
Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah; page 152. (b) Talmage, James E., Jesus the Christ, pages 201-202 (note 4). (c) 
Documentary History of the Church, Volume I; 1946 edition; Deseret Book Company, Salt Lake City, Utah; 
pages 40-41, and note. 
LIBRARY FILE REFERENCE: Jesus Christ — Apostles. 





David before Saul 



David before Saul 




David before Saul 





David before Saul 



■■^■^■i 




David before Saul 



David before Saul 




■■^^■■■HHm 




David before Saul 



David before Saul 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— J Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— 1 Samuel 16:17-19, 21, 23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— / Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him," 

— I Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— I Samuel 16:17-19, 21, 23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— I Samuel 16:17-19, 21, 23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him, 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him; and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— I Samuel 16:17-19,21,23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me now a man 
that can play well, and bring him to me. 

"Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in 
playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and 
prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the Lord is 
with him. 

"Wherefore Saul sent messengers unto Jesse, and said, Send 
me David thy son, which is with the sheep. . . . 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: and he 
loved him greatly; and he became his armourbearer. . . . 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was 
upon Saul, that David took an harp, and played with his hand: 
so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit de- 
parted from him." 

— I Samuel 16:17-19, 21, 23. 

Litho in U.S.A. by Wheelwright Lithographing Co. 
Painting by Ernest Norman For The Instructor 



A Picture Story 
by Marie F. Felt 




4 




David and 
Harp Comfort King Saul 



At Bethlehem, David and his family were very 
happy. They loved the Lord with all their hearts 
and tried to obey him. They felt pleased and hon- 
ored that David had been chosen to serve God in a 
very special way. Although they did not know how 
he was to assist the Lord, they were willing to wait 
until the Lord was ready to tell David what he was 
to do. In the meantime David returned to the hill- 
side to care for his father's sheep, and the Prophet 
Samuel went to his home in Ramah. 

At King Saul's court things were different than 
at David's home. There was no happiness in Saul's 
heart. This was not because David had been anointed 
to become king in Saul's place, because Saul did not 
know of David's calling. The real reason was that, 
". . . the Spirit of the Lord departed from Saul and 



(For Course 4, lesson of February 16. "Sharing Our Talents.") 
♦Adapted from story by same name in Marie F. Felt's Sacred 
Stories for Children; pages 102-103; copyright 1954. Used by per- 
mission of author. 



an evil spirit from the Lord troubled him." (/ Sam- 
uel 16:14.) Instead of being humble, kind, and 
thoughtful as he once had been, he often became 
angry and behaved strangely. He did not trust any- 
body. He seemed to feel that everyone was trying 
to harm him or to take his kingdom away from him. 
He was always troubled and afraid. 

Saul's servants knew of their master's condition. 
They wanted very much to help him if they could. 
They felt that if someone who played the harp very 
well could be with Saul when the king was behaving 
strangely, he could play soft, sweet music which 
would be restful to the king and help him to be less 
troubled. They spoke to the king about it and Saul 
was willing to let them find such a musician. 

"And Saul said unto his servants, Provide me 
now a man that can play well, and bring him to me." 

The servants were very pleased. They already 
knew someone who could do as they wished. His 



DECEMBER 1963 



443 



name was David; the same David who had been 
anointed to become king of Israel some day, but 
neither Saul nor his servants knew this. Then one 
of the servants said to King Saul, ". . . Behold, I 
have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is 
cunning in playing, and a mighty valiant man, and 
a man of war, and prudent in matters, and a comely 
person, and the Lord is with him." 

After hearing this, ". . . Saul sent messengers 
unto Jesse and said, Send me David thy son, which 
is with the sheep." 

Now Jesse must have been willing for David to 
go, for the Bible tells us that, ". . . Jesse took an 
ass laden with bread, and a bottle of wine, and a kid 
and sent them by David his son unto Saul." They 
were Jesse's gifts to the king of the country. 

"And David came to Saul, and stood before him: 
and he loved him greatly; and he became his armour- 
bearer. 

"And Saul sent to Jesse, saying, Let David, I 
pray thee, stand before me; for he hath found favour 
in my sight. 

"And it came to pass, when the evil spirit from 
God was upon Saul, that David took an harp, and 



A SONG OF THE HEART 

(Our Cover) 

Since the Lord's soul "delighteth in the song 
of the heart," at what better time and in what 
better place can sacred songs concerning the 
birth and mission of Jesus Christ be voiced than 
during Christmas season? There is also an 
added blessing for having gathered and sung 
under frost-laden windows of the aged, the 
widowed, the sick, and the children. 

The seven joyful yuletide singers shown 
on this month's Instructor cover, as well as all 
other carolers, will surely feel blessed for hav- 
ing given something to their neighbors and thus 
to the Lord. 

— Richard E. Scholle. 



(For Course 5, lesson of December 22, "To Give and Share 
Is the True Meaning of Christmas," and other Christmas les- 
sons.) 
Library File Reference: Christmas. 



played with his hand: so Saul was refreshed, and 
was well, and the evil spirit departed from him." 
(I Samuel 16: 17-23.) 

How To Use the Picture 

In this issue of The Instructor are small pictures 
of "David before Saul." 

The teacher may wish to use the large picture of 
"David before Saul" which has been published by 
The Instructor in the center spread of the August, 
1956, issue and in many libraries is available to tell 
the story, "David and His Harp Comfort King Saul." 
After the story has been told, the teacher may pass 
one of the small pictures to each student in the class. 

The pictures may be mounted on construction 
paper before they are given to the children, or they 
may be placed directly in the student's Sunday 
School scrapbook. Paste should be applied to only 
one edge of the picture so that the picture can be 
raised for reading and reference to the scripture 
printed on the back. 



Library File Reference: David. 



• • • 



Released with Appreciation 

DR. JOHN R. HALLIDAY 

Because he was recently called to serve as bishop 
of Manavu Ward, Dr. John R. Halliday has been re- 
leased as a member of the General Board of the 
Deseret Sunday School Union. 

Dr. Halliday has held numerous other positions 
in the Church. He labored as a missionary in Ger- 
many, as a stake Sunday School board member, as 
a counselor in a bishopric, and as a high councilman 
in Provo Stake. He also served for one year as 
Assistant Director of the Salt Lake Mormon Tab- 
ernacle Choir. 

He is a highly educated and trained professional. 
He received his general education at Brigham Young 
University, where he earned both his A.B. and M.A. 
degrees. Before doing work on his Ph.D. at the 
Eastman School of Music of the University of 
Rochester, one of the highest rated musical institu- 
tions in the United States, he completed a year's 
work in Berlin, Germany. 

Since receiving his doctorate he has worked in 
Paris, Rome, and at the University of Southern 
California. Dr. Halliday is noted as an accomplished 
instrumentalist and theorist. His specialty is choral 
conducting. He is a professor of music at BYU. 

He and his wife have two daughters, two sons, 
and two grandchildren. — Gerrit de Jong, Jr. 



444 



THE INSTRUCTOR 




HHBHI 

iMllMfflffllMfnrfli 





J^vV 






* i 




« 



*<*%* : 



I know some one with silvery hair, 
Who sits and rocks in an easy 

chair, 
That's my grandma, my dear 

grandma. 1 



(For Course 1, lesson of February 9, 
"Grandfather and Grandmother Are in the 
Family.") 

■From Childhood — Book II, by Harriet 
Blanche Jones and Florence Newell Barbour; 
copyright 1918, The Arthur P. Schmidt Co- 
New York; copyright renewed, 1946. 
Library File Reference: Family Life. 



MY GRANDMA 



DECEMB ER 1 96 



Advancement of Classes 




Superintendents 



Sunday, Jan. 5, 1964, will be 
the day for advancement of classes 
and for previewing the new lessons 
for the year. Neither should be 
a problem if the ward superin- 
tendency follows fundamental pro- 
cedures. 

Well ahead of the end of the 
year the alert superintendency 
and secretary will study rolls, esti- 
mate the attendance of each class 
for 1964, and prepare for the su- 
perintendency's benefit an assign- 
ment of classrooms appropriate in 
size for all classes. 

On Jan. 5, no announcement 
of advancements is to be made in 
the worship service. This would 
detract from the quiet reverence 
and take the worshiper's thoughts 
away from the purpose of the serv- 
ice. The Sunday School separates 
from the worship service to classes 
and classrooms of 1963. 

Ordinarily classes will remain in 
the same rooms as 1963. When this 
happens, each teacher will intro- 
duce new subject matter for the 
year; and new work will begin 
without disturbance. 

When there is a change of rooms, 
it is advisable to take the new 
class to a vacant room. Unless the 
classroom size discrepancy re- 
quires a different plan, the older 
students should be moved first. To 
do this, the Superintendency starts 
with the class which has been 
studying Course 15, "Life in An- 
cient America." Members of this 
class are combined with those of 
former Course No. 19, "The Arti- 
cles of Faith," in one room, where 
they will study Course 16, "The 
Gospel Message." If this class is 
large and contains members who 
have been in the Gospel Message 
Department (Courses 16, 17, 18 
and 19) for four years, a Junior 



Gospel Doctrine class should be 
formed of these young people, and 
other younger members of the Gos- 
pel Doctrine class should study 
Course 26, "Jesus The Christ." 

Members of the class who were 
studying Course 13, "Principles of 
the Restored Church at Work" in 
1963 are then escorted to the 
room vacated by the former pupils 
of Course 15. Former pupils of 
Course 11 go to the room vacated 
by the former pupils of Course 
13, and so on. 

In the Junior Sunday School, 
children who will be four years old 
on Jan. 5, 1964, are taken out of 
Course 1 and joined with the mem- 
bers of Course la to form Course 
2, which is then composed of pupils 
who will be four and five years old 
on this day. This is the only class 
in which the individual ages of the 
members are important on ad- 
vancement day. 

Disregard individual ages in all 
other advancements and advance 
whole classes only. Do not make 
individual adjustments at this 
time. Displacements can be cor- 
rected later. Changing of one in- 
dividual on this day from the 
normal advancement of his class 
invites others to adjust themselves. 

The advancement schedule is 
outlined below. 

Note that the Genealogy class 
(Course 20) is a one-year course 
only, and repeats the subject mat- 
ter of last year. It is an intro- 
ductory course, and the class mem- 
bers should all be new. 

In Course 26, the Sunday School 
has taken over from the Melchize- 
dek Priesthood quorums the sec- 
ond half of the study of Dr. James 
E. Talmage's Jesus The Christ. 
Additional material for both class 
members and teachers is being 



written by Dr. Lowell L. Bennion 
and will appear in each issue of 
The Instructor. Effective teaching 
of this course will be facilitated if 
a copy of The Instructor is in the 
hands of each class member. 

— Superintendent David 
Lawrence McKay. 



Why Not Course 1 a Each Year? 

Course la holds a unique posi- 
tion in the advancement program 
of Junior Sunday School classes. 

It is an extra course for four- 
year-old children and is taught 
only in odd years. This prevents 
holding children in Course 1 in 
odd years where the same lessons 
would be repeated. 

Course la is needed only in odd 
years since four-year-old children 
advance to Course 2 in even years. 
This tends to aid in synchronizing 
courses in the overall program of 
advancement. 

This is the only course in which 
individual ages of children are im- 
portant on advancement day, and 
only children who are four years 
old by January 1 of odd years are 
enrolled. 

Course la creates a class op- 
portunity where children of the 
same age identify closely with one 
another as they advance through- 
out Sunday School. As a group, 
important events occur to them 
about the same time, such as bap- 
tism, and priesthood experiences. 
Lasting friendships are formed and 
spiritual experiences become sa- 
cred to them as they grow up, 
learning the Gospel together. 

An excellent and informative 
article on class advancements ap- 
pears on the opposite page. 

— Addie J. Gilmore. 



446 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Advancement Schedule, January 5, 1964 



1963 

COURSE 

NO. 



1963 SUBJECT 



1964 

COURSE 

NO. 



1964 SUBJECT 



1. A Gospel of Love > 

1. A Gospel of Love ■ > 

la. Beginnings of Religious Praise >> 

3. Growing in the Gospel, Part II > 

5. Living Our Religion, Part II >> 

7. History of the Church for Children ^ 

9. Scripture Lessons in Leadership >> 

11. History of the Restored Church > 

13. Principles of the Restored Church at Work > 

15. Life in Ancient America >> 

19. The Articles of Faith >■ 



1. A Gospel of Love 1 

2. Growing in the Gospel, Part I 2 

4. Living Our Religion, Part I 

6. What It Means To Be a Latter-day Saint 

8. Old Testament Stories 

10. The Life of Christ 

12. Church of Jesus Christ in Ancient Times 

14. Message of The Master 

16. The Gospel Message 



NOTE: Except from Course 1, 
group promotions out of the class 
should not be made. The entire 
class is given the new course sub- 
ject as indicated by the arrow. 
Teachers and classrooms may be 
changed. 



Elective Courses for Adults in 1964: 

20. Genealogical Research, A Practical Mission 
(Genealogical Training) 

23. Teaching the Gospel (Teacher Training, Restricted) 

24. Gospel Living in the Home (Family Relations) 

26. Jesus the Christ (Gospel Doctrine) 

28. The Articles of Faith (Gospel Essentials) 

(See The Sunday School Handbook for membership.) 



1 Children who will not be four years old on Jan. 5, 1964. 

includes from Course 1 only those children who will be four years old on Jan. 5, 1964. 



Course 6 for 1964 bears the same 
title as in previous years — "What 
It Means To Be a Latter-day 
Saint" — but it is an entirely new 
manual. It portrays the concepts 
and behavior which will help the 
students to become true followers 
of Jesus Christ. It offers the 



The New Manual for Course 6 

teacher an abundant supply of 
material with which to illustrate 
and enliven the topics presented. 

This is an old friend in a new 
and attractive costume. 

The author, Sister Marie F. Felt, 
is a graduate of the University of 
Utah where she specialized in the 



kindergarten-primary field. She 
has written many stories, articles, 
and manuals pertaining to Gospel 
subjects. Many of her stories are 
to be found in The Instructor mag- 
azine. She has long been a mem- 
ber of the General Board of the 
Deseret Sunday School Union. 



DECEMBER 1963 



447 



Answers To Your Questions 



Should Sunday Schools Be Opened and Closed on Time? 

Q. Is it important to open and close Sunday 
Schools on time? 

A. Yes. The Presiding Bishopric emphasizes this 
importance in the following language. "The matter 
of punctuality should be taught to the members by 
example. In many instances, failure of the con- 
ducting officer to begin a meeting on time is the 
result of poor planning or, perhaps, some indiffer- 
ence. . . . Where two or more wards occupy the same 
building, bishops should avoid going beyond the 
time scheduled for meetings and classes. . . . 

"Do not permit the spirit of the meeting to be 
destroyed with long announcements. It is prefer- 
able to eliminate long announcements. This may 
be done by preparing a bulletin to hand to the mem- 
bers as they adjourn from the meeting to take home 



with them for reference during the week.' 
Messenger, August, 1963. 



See The 



Which Children Compose Course 2? 

Q. Which children compose Course 2 organized 
on the first Sunday in January, 1964? 

— Toronto Stake. 

A. Children from Courses 1 and la who on the 
first Sunday of January will be four or five years of 
age compose Course 2. Children three years old or 
younger on the first Sunday in January are retained 
in Course 1 even though this entails repetition of 
part or all of the course for them. Repetition at this 
age is desirable. See The Sunday School Handbook, 
page 41. (The references to "September 1" should 
be deleted.) 

— Superintendent Lynn S. Richards. 



Memorized Recitations 



for Feb. 2, 1964 

To be memorized by students 
in Courses 8 and 14 during Decem- 
ber and January and recited in the 
worship service on Feb. 2, 1964. 
(Taken from A Uniform System 
for Teaching Investigators). 

Course 8: 

(This scripture applies to re- 
pentance.) 

"Now when they heard this, they 
were pricked in their heart, and 
said unto Peter and to the rest 
of the apostles, Men and brethren, 
what shall we do? Then Peter said 
unto them, Repent, and be bap- 



tized every one of you in the name 
of Jesus Christ for the remission 
of sins, and ye shall receive the 
gift of the Holy Ghost." 

—Acts 2:37, 38. 

Course 14: 

(This scripture applies to the 
apostasy from Christ's Church.) 

"For I know this, that after my 
departing shall grievous wolves 
enter in among you, not sparing 
the flock. Also of your own selves 
shall men arise, speaking perverse 
things, to draw away disciples after 
them." 

—Acts 20:29, 30. 



The Deseret Sunday School Union 



COMING EVENTS 

Dec. 22, 1963 

Christmas Worship Service 

• • • 

Jan. 5, 1964 

Advancement of Classes 

New Courses Begin 

• • • 

Jan. 19, 1964 
100-per-cent Sunday 

• • • 

Mar. 29, 1964 
Easter Services 



George R. Hill, General Superintendent 
David Lawrence McKay, First Assistant General Superintendent; Lynn S. Richards, Second Assistant General Superintendent; 
Wallace F. Bennett, General Treasurer; Paul B. Tanner, Assistant General Treasurer; Richard E. Folland, General Secretary 

MEMBERS OF THE DESERET SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION BOARD 



George R. Hill 
David L. McKay 
Lynn S. Richards 
Wallace F. Bennett 
Richard E. Folland 
Lucy G. Sperry 
Marie F. Felt 
Gerrit de Jong, Jr. 
Earl J. Glade 
A. William Lund 
Kenneth S. Bennion 
J. Holman Waters 
H. Aldous Dixon 
Leland H. Monson 
Alexander Schreiner 
Lorna C. Alder 
A. Parley Bates 



William P. Miller 
Vernon J. LeeMaster 
Claribel W. Aldous 
Eva May Green 
Melba Glade 
Addie L. Swapp 
W. Lowell Castleton 
Henry Eyring 
Carl J. Christensen 
Hazel F. Young 
Florence S. Allen 
Beth Hooper 
Asahel D. Woodruff 
Frank S. Wise 
Clair W. Johnson 
Delmar H. Dickson 
Clarence Tyndall 



Wallace G. Bennett 
Addie J. Gilmore 
Camille W. Halliday 
Margaret Hopkinson 
Mima Rasband 
Edith M. Nash 
Minnie E. Anderson 
Alva H. Parry 
Bernard S. Walker 
Harold A. Dent 
Paul B. Tanner 
Catherine Bowles 
Raymond B. Holbrook 
Joseph Fielding Smith, Jr. 
Lorin F. Wheelwright 
Fred W. Schwendiman 
Lewis J. Wallace 



Clarence E. Wonnacott 
Lucy Picco 
Arthur D. Browne 
J. Roman Andrus 
Howard S. Bennion 
Herald L. Carlston 
O. Preston Robinson 
Robert F. Gwilliam 
Dale H. West 
Bertrand F. Harrison 
Willis S. Peterson 
Greldon L. Nelson 
Thomas J. Parmley 
Jane L. Hopkinson 
Oliver R. Smith 
G. Robert Ruff 



Anthony I. Bentley 
Mary W. Jensen 
John S. Boyden 
Golden L. Berrett 
Marshall T. Burton 
Edith B. Bauer 
Elmer J. Hartvigsen 
Donna D. Sorensen 
Calvin C. Cook 
A. Hamer Reiser 
Edgar B. Brossard 
Robert M. Cundick 
Clarence L. Madsen 
J. Elliot Cameron 
Bertrand A. Childs 
James R. Tolman 



Richard L. Evans, Howard W. Hunter, Advisers to the General Board 



448 



THE INSTRUCTOR 




To Kindle Another 

We Ourselves 

Must First Glow 

Help me reach a child in darkness, 
Help me lead him through the night; 

Help me come prepared to guide him, 
With Thy lamp of wisdom's light. 

— from a Hymn by the Author. 

"... I am the light of the world: he that fol- 
loweth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have 
the light of life." (John 8:12.) Thus did Jesus tell 
us that His mission was to give light unto mankind — 
the "light of life." In ancient times, Isaiah fore- 
saw the heavy days of darkness which should befall 
Israel when he prophesied: "And they shall look 
unto the earth; and behold trouble and darkness, 
dimness of anguish; and they shall be driven to 
darkness." (Isaiah 8:22.) With the coming of Christ, 
Matthew tells us that "The people which sat in dark- 
ness saw great light; and to them which sat in the 
region and shadow of death light is sprung up." 
(Matthew 4:16.) 

It is this "light of life" brought into the world 
by Jesus which can lead the children of men from 
the "dimness of anguish" into the joy of truth. John 
said it came ". . . that your joy may be full . . . God 

(Especially good for teachers and parents.) 



is light, and in him is no darkness at all." (/ John 
1:4, 5.) He admonished all who had seen it to 
believe and follow it. He said: "If we say that we 
have fellowship with him, and walk in darkness, we 
lie, and do not the truth: But if we walk in the light, 
as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with 
another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son 
cleanseth us from all sin." (/ John 1:6, 7.) We can 
easily stray; and Paul warned: "Let no man deceive 
you with vain words: . . . For ye were sometimes 
darkness, but now are ye light in the Lord; walk as 
children of light." (Ephesians 5:6-8.) 

To be prepared to guide a child, a teacher must 
be filled with the light of Christ. She must fill her 
own lamp as did the wise virgins, that she might be 
ready to respond to every opportunity for lighting 
the way into paths of righteousness. This powerful 
symbol of the lighted lamp emerges from the tradi- 
tions of ancient Israel. It was a mark of wisdom 
to leave a lamp burning day and night so that a fire 
might be lighted. The proverb said of the virtuous 
woman: "... her candle goeth not out by night . . . 
she reacheth forth her hands to the needy." (Prov- 
erbs 31:18, 20.) On the contrary, Job's companion 
said, "Yea, the light of the wicked shall be put out, 
and the spark of his fire shall not shine." (Job 18:5.) 
To be prepared is to be enlightened, knowing that 
he who would kindle another must himself first glow. 

As we sing this stanza of the hymn, "Help Me 
Teach with Inspiration," we pray that we might 
reach a child. This involves a sacred trust. Jesus 
looked upon the child as the personification of hu- 
mility. He warned us not to deceive nor mislead. 
He said: ". . . whoso shall offend one of these little 
ones which believe in me, it were better for him that 
a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that 
he were drowned in the depth of the sea." (Matthew 
18:6.) 

The leading principle of righteousness is con- 
cisely expressed by John Taylor, who said, ". . . It 
is true intelligence for a man to take a subject that 
is mysterious and great in itself, and to unfold and 
simplify it so that a child can understand it." 1 

When we pray for wisdom and light in our 
teaching, we commit ourselves to so shine that our 
light will draw others to us, that through us the 
light of Christ will glow in all we say and do, and 
that by our good works and our words of wisdom, 
men, women, and little children may find the com- 
fort of light amid the shadows and dimness of 
anguish. 

To kindle another, we ourselves must first glow. 
— Lorin F. Wheelwright, Associate Editor. 



a Durham, G. Homer, The Gospel Kingdom; Bookcraft Company, 
Salt Lake City, Utah, 1943 edition; page 270. 
Library File Reference: Teachers and Teaching. 



DECEMBER 1963 



449 



"GOD OF OUR FATHERS 
WHOSE ALMIGHTY HAND 

Senior Sunday School Hymn for the Month of February 




"God of Our Fathers, Whose 
Almighty Hand"; author, Daniel 
C. Roberts; composer, George W. 
Warren; Hymns — Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints, No. 
54. 

This hymn of patriotism and 
thanksgiving was written by a 
chaplain in the national guard. 
The hymn tune was written by a 
church organist. It is a true hymn 
because the words are addressed to 
Deity in the attitude of prayer. 
Consider these phrases: "Our 
grateful songs before thy throne 
arise," "Thy love divine," "Be 
thou our ruler," "Thy bounteous 
goodness nourish us in peace." Let 
us therefore encourage our people 
to sing this hymn as a prayer ad- 
dressed to the throne of grace and 
not merely as a common song. We 
are singing in the Lord's house on 
His holy day before Him and to 
Him in united heart and voice. 

We are reminded of the brilliant 
occasion in 1953 in Westminster 
Abbey, London, at the coronation 
of Queen Elizabeth II. The great 
choir sang while the queen was 
kneeling at the altar. The choir 
did not sing, "0 Queen, our Gov- 
ernour." Rather, they sang an an- 
them taken from various Psalms of 
David: "O Lord, our Governour, 
how excellent is thy Name in all 
the world. Behold, God our de- 
fender: and look upon the face of 
thine Anointed. hold thou up 
her going in thy paths; that her 
foot-steps slip not. Save, Lord, and 
hear us, King of heaven; when 
we call upon thee." (See Psalms 
8:1, 84:9, 17:5, 20:9.) 

It is well to be reminded that 
although we have our earthly rul- 
ers, our real governor is the Lord 



of Hosts. We will address our 
hymns of thanksgiving and praise 
to the Lord our Governor, in this 
February music. 

Also sung in the same spirit at 
the time of Queen Elizabeth II 
coronation was the following an- 
cient and quaint hymn: 

All people that on earth do dwell, 
Sing to the Lord with cheerful 

voice; 
Him serve with fear, his praise 

forth tell, 
Come ye before him, and rejoice. 

The Lord, ye know, is God indeed, 
Without our aid he did us make; 
We are his folk, he doth us feed, 
And for his sheep he doth us take. 

O enter then his gates with praise, 
Approach with joy his courts unto; 
Praise, laud, and bless his name 

always, 
For it is seemly so to do. 

To the Chorister and Organist: 

Our hymn tune is pitched rather 
high. If the organist can transpose, 
or is willing to practice it one 
tone lower, in the key of E Flat, or 
is willing to write it out, it will be 
rewarding to do it in the lower key. 
Perhaps some of our choristers 
who direct the singing would be so 
kind as to write out the music for 
the organist in the key of E Flat. 
— Alexander Schreiner. 

(The hymn for March, 1964, will be "O 
God, the Eternal Father"; Hymns, No. 125.) 



Correction 

The Senior Sunday School 
article, "A Mighty Fortress Is 
Our God," described in the 
November Instructor as the 
hymn for February, 1964, 
should rightly have been en- 
titled, "Senior Sunday School 
Hymn for the Month of Jan- 
uary." 



New Singers We Have 
Always With Us 

The membership of the Church 
has doubled in the last fifteen 
years. More than a million souls 
have either been born into the fold 
and baptized, or have been con- 
verted and baptized. 

Many of this great throng are 
learning not only the doctrines of 
the Restored Gospel and develop- 
ing testimonies and convictions of 
the might and power of the Lord's 
latter-day work, but theirs is also 
the formidable task of learning 
some 222 hymns, most of which 
we use in our worship services 
throughout the year. 

We are eager that all those who 
are baptized shall be well-ac- 
quainted with the ordinances of 
the Gospel, with the manner of 
worship, and be fully fellowshiped 
in order to feel at home in our 
chapels. But, in addition, these 
million or more new souls need to 
have every opportunity to learn 
the songs of the faithful, the hymns 
of Zion. Especially should they 
know those hymns which we have 
learned to love through their 
blessed influence upon our lives, 
and the happiness they give us in 
singing together of the Lord's 
marvelous work and a wonder. 

It is the chief opportunity and 
assignment of Sunday School chor- 
isters to teach hymns in the 
Church, to teach them in such a 
way that we shall love them and 
to sing them together with the 
faithful — one in spirit, in mind, in 
faith, and in serene happiness. 

Remember the tens of thousands 
of new Church members every 
year. 

— Alexander Schreiner. 



450 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Junior Sunday School Hymn for the Month of February 



"While I Drink the Water 
Clear"; author, Anna Johnson; 
composer, Alexander Schreiner. 

Appropriate sacramental hymns 
for Junior Sunday School are 
those which specifically mention 
the sacramental emblems and 
those in which children sing of 
Jesus Christ. "While I Drink the 
Water Clear" is a wonderful hymn 
for the sacrament. 

When teaching new hymns to 
children, choristers should sing 
them without accompaniment of 
organ or piano. Children need to 



here the melody (tune). In some 
instances, the accompaniment con- 
fuses children because they can- 
not hear when the melody goes up 
and down. After the hymn has 
been learned, the children should 
listen as the accompaniment is 
played. Then everyone should 
join in singing as the organist plays 
the accompaniment. 

To the Chorister: 

The hymn is composed of four 
two-measure phrases. The rhythm 
of the first and third phrases is 
alike. 



While I Drink the Water Clear 



Anna Johnson 



Alexander Schreiner 




t 



PP 



i=S 



£ 



1. While I drink the 

2. Of the Sav - ior 



wa 
I 



S 



ter clear, While I 
will think, In His 

.p. 

? — : 



-9- 



eat the bread, 
name I ' 11 pray, 



i 



&-*- 



i 



pp? 



3^ 



^^1 



I will fold my arms up so, 
I will serve and hon - or Him, 



will bow my head. 
:he Sab - bath day. 



§g 



On the Sab - ba 

1 A J J 



p==^ 



6 



s 



February Sacrament Gems 

For Senior Sunday School For Junior Sunday School 

". . . Choose you this day whom Jesus said: 
ye will serve; . . . but as for me ". . . And if ye do always re- 
and my house, we will serve the member me ye shall have my spirit 
Lord." 1 to be with you." 2 

i Joshua 24:15. 2 3 Nephi 18:7. 

Organ Music To Accompany Sacrament Gems 

Robert Cundick 
<7\ 




The notes of the second and 
sixth measures appear alike except 
the notes are written a step higher 
on the staff. However, the second 
and third notes of the sixth mea- 
sure are only one-half step apart, 
while those in the second measure 
are a whole step apart. 

Because the hymn is simple in 
construction and short in length, 
use the whole song method in 
teaching the number. The chor- 
ister should sing it three or four 
times as the children listen. Then 
she should encourage the boys and 
girls to join in singing as many 
words or phrases as they can. 

After the hymn has been taught 
several Sundays, many of the chil- 
dren will be able to sing it from 
memory. It should be sung at a 
moderate tempo, with the chorister 
using the interval beat pattern. 
This pattern shows children the 
direction of the melody by the use 
of the chorister's hands. 

To the Organist: 

The introduction for a sacra- 
mental number should be played 
softly. Because this particular 
piece ends on a different pitch 
than the first note of the hymn, 
the organist should play the first 
note of the hymn before the chil- 
dren begin singing. 

"While I Drink the Water Clear" 
has a beautiful melody line. It 
should be heard above the chords 
in the left hand. Observe the acci- 
dental (G sharp) in the second 
line of the bass clef. 

Organists and choristers should 
practice the hymn of the month to- 
gether several times before pre- 
senting it to children so that their 
interpretations will be alike. 

It is recommended that all Jun- 
ior Sunday School musicians have 
access to A Guide for Choristers 
and Organists in Junior Sunday 
School. This may be purchased at 
the Deseret Book Store for fifty 
cents. 

— Florence S. Allen. 



DECEMBER 1963 



451 



IN THE TIME OF THE 

HERODIANS 



by Burl Shephard* 

Not quite a century after the Jewish Maccabean 
family had delivered their country from tyranny, 
their descendants had become involved in family 
quarrels which invited foreign intervention and re- 
sulted in Palestine becoming subject to Rome. 

Effective in helping to undermine Judean inde- 
pendence was Antipater, descendant of a distin- 
guished Idumean family, and the father of Herod 
the Great. He came from an aristocratic family 
and apparently followed in his father's footsteps as 
governor of Idumea. When Pompey conquered 
Jerusalem in 63 B.C., Antipater secured effective 
power over the Jewish nation. In 47 B.C. Caesar 
recognized his continued assistance to Rome by mak- 
ing him officially the procurator of Judea. 

The Jews were well treated under Caeser, but 
those in Palestine hated all Roman rule. In Anti- 
pater they saw only a grasping, selfish tyrant eager 
for greater power. Of his four sons, he proclaimed 
the oldest, Phasael, governor of Jerusalem and the 
surrounding area; and Herod, a youth of twenty- 
five years, was named governor of Galilee. In the 
intrigues that followed, Antipater died by poison. 

Recognizing Herod as an ambitious tyrant, and 
attempting to preserve the authority of his posi- 
tion as ruling high priest among the Jews (inherited 
through the Maccabean family) , Hyrcanus betrothed 
his granddaughter Mariamne, a Judean beauty, to 
Herod. Mark Anthony appointed Herod and Phasael 
tetrarchs in the Jewish state. 

At this time the Jews were successful in revolting 
against Roman rule, under the persistent leadership 
of Antigonus, a Maccabean descendant, and with 
the help of the Parthians. Captured by Antigonus, 
Phasael committed suicide to avoid disgrace Herod 
eluded captivity and finally made his way to Rome. 



(For Course 14, lesson of January 12, "In the Time of the 
Herodians," and for Course 16, lessons of February 9 and 16, "Jesus 
Christ in the Meridian of Time.") 

* Sister Shephard completed her public and high school education 
in Cardston, Alberta, Canada, and graduated from Garbutt Business 
College, Calgarv, Alberta. Later she graduated from Utah State 
University with a B.'S. degree. She has held numerous positions in 
the Church including one as a missionary in Great Britain and 
another as an officiator in the Alberta Temple. While associated 
with USU, she served as editor of the campus literary magazine, and 
was employed for two years with the college News Bureau. She 
also worked on the staff of The Improvement Era for three years as 
editor of "Today's Family." Sister Shephard is presently serving as 
Production Editor of The Instructor. 



For a brief three years Antigonus ruled the Jews; 
but Herod had been proclaimed king of Judea by 
the Roman Senate in 40 B.C., and he returned to 
fight for his kingdom during most of those three 
years. In the spring of 37 B.C., he was successful 
in taking Jerusalem, and he began building his 
kingdom on its ruins. By personally giving costly 
gifts to each soldier, he had kept them from plun- 
dering the temple and entirely destroying the city. 

Suspicious of his Jewish relatives, Herod could 
not rest until he had destroyed them as threats to 
his power, and one by one they were executed. 
Hyrcanus, who had hopefully betrothed his grand- 
daughter Mariamne to Herod, was believed by Herod 
to be too popular among the Jews. Against the 
counsel of all his Jewish friends, Hyrcanus was per- 
suaded to come to Jerusalem and take up residence 
in the royal court of Herod. He was treated with 
honor, but suspicious Herod later accused him of 
plotting against the king and had him put to death. 

Herod also feared Mariamne's young brother 
Aristobulus III, because of his lineage, his great 
beauty, and his overwhelming popularity among the 
Jews. They hopefully looked to him, the last lineal 
descendant of the Maccabees, to become their high 
priest and liberator. At the youthful age of seven- 
teen, he was made high priest and a year later art- 
fully drowned by his companions at the baths. 

Herod's favorite wife Mariamne I, granddaughter 
of Hyrcanus, whom he loved almost more than life 
itself, fell prey to his jealousies, and in a rage one 
day he ordered her execution. ". . . As soon as ever 
his passion was over, he repented of what he had 
done, and as soon as his anger was worn off, his 
affections were kindled again. And indeed the flame 
of his desires for her was so ardent, that he could 
not think she was dead, but would appear, under 
his disorders to speak to her as if she were still 
alive. . . ."* Mariamne's mother also was put to 
death by Herod. 

This drastic action did not end his troubles. All 
his relatives and his wives were continually involved 
in court gossip and sought to stir up Herod's sus- 
picious mind against his Judean sons. His son, Anti- 
pater, poisoned him against Alexander and Aristo- 
bulus, sons of Mariamne, who had been designated 
heirs to the throne. In 7 B.C. Herod's court found 
these sons guilty of treason, and they were executed. 
This did not help young Antipater; for three years 
later he, too, fell victim to Herod's suspicions and 
was executed just a few days before Herod's death. 

"Herod's suspicious nature is well illustrated by 
the story of the visit of the Magi and the slaughter 
of the infants of Bethlehem (Matthew 2); although 



The Life and Works of Flavins Josephus, translated by William 
Whiston, A.M., 1957 edition; The John C. Winston Co., Philadelphia; 
pages 644-5. 



452 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



this story does not appear elsewhere, any rumour of 
a rival king of the Jews was bound to rouse his 
worst fears. This suspicion latterly grew to insane 
proportions, and in consequence Herod has been 
remembered more for his murderous outbursts than 
for his administrative ability." 2 

That Herod did have great ability is without 
question. He undertook lavish cultural projects both 
in his own realm and in foreign cities. In Jerusalem, 
he had constructed a marvelous palace for himself; 
and, about 20 B.C., he began to rebuild the temple in 
such magnificence and splendor that it became the 
admiration of the whole world. However, he also 
erected temples to pagan deities in other places. 
Herod had ten wives, and before his death at nearly 
70 years of age in 4 B.C., he finally bequeathed 
his kingdom to three of his sons. 3 The will was 
subject to ratification in Rome, and was approved 
as follows: 

1. Judea and Samaria to Archelaus, a son by his 
wife Malthace, a Samaritan. (See Matthew 
2:22.) 

We are told that Archelaus, known as Herod the 
Ethnarch, had the worst reputation of all the sons 
of Herod. He continued the great building program 
of his father, but his rule was so wicked that a dele- 
gation of Jews and Samaritans was sent to Rome 
and was successful in getting him deposed. 

2. Galilee and Peraea to Herod Antipas, also a 
son by Malthace. 



z The New Bible Dictionary, organizing Editor J. D. Douglas; Wm. 
B. Eerdman's Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, Mich., 1962; page 522. 
3 The New Bible Dictionary, page 522. 



Known as Herod the Tetrarch, Antipas was the 
ablest of Herod's sons. He was denounced by John 
the Baptist for marrying Herodias, who, according 
to the King James version of the Bible, had been 
the wife of his half-brother Philip. He is best known 
in the scriptures for the execution of John the Bap- 
tist (Mark 6:14-28) and for his brief meeting with 
Jesus, when Jesus was §ent to him by Pilate (Luke 
23:7). Jesus once referred to him as "that fox." 
(Luke 13:31, 32.) He was deposed in A.D. 39 and 
ended his days in exile with his wife, Herodias. 

3. Northeastern territories to Philip (see Luke 
3:1), a son by his wife Cleopatra of Jeru- 
salem. 

The next Herod to rule the Jewish nation was 
Herod Agrippa I (Acts 12:1-23), a grandson of 
Mariamne I; and thus he was part Jewish. Under 
the emperor Gaius (Caligula) he received the royal 
title of king in territories northeast of Palestine, 
and eventually ruled over all of the former kingdom 
of Herod the Great. He courted the goodwill of 
the Jews who accepted him because of his Jewish 
ancestry. His attack on the apostles was likely 
popular because they had begun to preach the 
Gospel among the Gentiles. (Acts 10:1-48.) He 
died in A.D. 44; his son Agrippa II, born A.D. 27, 
ruled only part of the kingdom of his father. Despite 
his efforts to prevent war, the Jewish conflict against 
Rome began during his reign. He is best known 
in scriptures for his encounter with Paul, to whom 
he made the oft-quoted remark: "Almost thou per- 
suadest me to be a Christian." (Acts 26:28.) He 
died about A.D. 100, the last of the Herods. 



Library File Reference: Herod. 



DESCENDANTS 

OF HEROD 

THE GREAT 

THROUGH 

FIVE OF HIS 

TEN WIVES 



'• "" :. 



DORIS 

an Idumean 



MARIAMNE I 

the Maccabean princess 
put to death by Herod 



MARIAMNE II 

daughter of Simon, 
the high priest 




MALTHACE 

a Samaritan 



CLEOPATRA 

of Jerusalem 



ANTIPATER 

put to death by Herod 




ARISTOBULUS 

put to death 
(strangled) by Herod 

ALEXANDER 

put to death 
(strangled) by Herod 



HEROD PHILIP 



married Herodias, 

ARCHELAUS 

Herod the Ethnarch 

ANTIPAS 

Herod the Tetrarch, 
married Herodias 
(former wife of Philip) 



HEROD PHILIP II 

^ Tetrarch of Iturea 
and Trachonitis, 
died A.D. 34 



+. HEROD AGRIPPA I 

died A.D. 44 



^ HEROD AGRIPPA II 

died about A.D. 100 




SALOME 

married Herod Philip II 



THE HERODS OF JUDEA 
37 B.C.-A.D. 100 5 

^Adapted from Chart "The Fearful Family of Herod" 
The Instructor, October, 1958; inside back cover. 



DECEMBER 1963 



453 



THE INSTRUCTOR 1963 INDEX 

(Listed by titles, subjects, authors, and illustrations) 



(abt) About 
(c) Chart 
(v) Verse 



KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS 

© 62 Cnvt 1963 Convention issue 

copyrighted in 1962 

© 63 Cnvt 1963 Convention issue 
copyrighted in 1963 



TITLES, SUBJECTS, AUTHORS 



Page 



A Land of Promise, Provided. . . ; Leland H. Monson .... 20 

"A Mighty Fortress Is Our God," 

Alexander Schreiner 28, 404 

A Song of the Heart (Our Cover), Richard E. Scholle 444 

Abundant Life, The Mission of the Church, The; 

David O. McKay 1 

Accept the Challenge, Alvin R. Dyer 30 

Acid Test of Deeds, The; 

Lorin F. Wheelwright ..Inside front cover, March 

Action Level (c) © 62 Cnvt 10 

Adam and Eve, The Sons of; Marie F. Felt 287 

Add Parents to Our Teaching Team, Don L. McConkie....292 

Advancement of Courses, David Lawrence McKay 446 

Advancement Schedule, January 5, 1964 (c) 447 

Adventures of the Spirit (President David O. McKay) 

Lorin F. Wheelwright Center spread, January 

Adventures of the Spirit (President Henry D. Moyle) 

Leland H. Monson Center spread, November 

Alder, Lorna C; Follow the Leader ...434 

Aidis, Dorothy; "Little" (v) 416 

Aldous, Claribel W.; File Your Personal Teaching Aids.. 168 

Aldous, Claribel W.; Jane Hopkinson; and Mary W. 

Jensen; Obedience ; ©62 Cnvt 18 

Aldous, Claribel W.; New Horizons for Teacher Service.133 

Aldous, Claribel W.; Treasures of Eternity 46 

Aldous, Claribel W.; We Are Honoring Mothers 95 

Aldous, Claribel W.; We Celebrate His Birth 414 

Alexander the Great: He Held His Spear, 

Wendell J. Ashton Back cover article, April 

"All Aboard" for Family Adventures, Calvin C. Cook 236 

All Learning Begins with Perceptions ©62 Cnvt 7 

Allen, Florence S., 

Junior Sunday School hymn of the month series 

"Sweet Sabbath Day" 217 

"Forgiveness" 259 

"Hosanna" 295 

"Lord We Thank Thee" .330 

"Away in a Manger" 367 

"Sweet Is the Work, My God, My King" 405 

"While I Drink the Water Clear" 451 

Alma the Younger: His First Missionary Companion, 

Marshall T. Burton 162 

Ambition's Nobler Way, Lorin F. Wheelwright 355 

America — Prophecy: A Land of Promise, Provided. . . ; 

Leland H. Monson 20 

Analysis ©62 Cnvt 28 

Anderson, Arthur S. and Oscar W. McConkie, Jr.; 

Life Eternal 432 

Anderson, Janice J. and Arthur S.; 

Here Is Honesty in Action 116 

Andrus, J. Roman; How To Look at Art 82 

Another Teacher's Testimony; N. Eldon Tanner 

:---- .-.- ©63 Cnvt 12 

Answering Questions with Questions, 

Lorin F. Wheelwright .175 



Page 

Answers to Your Questions, Lynn S. Richards 

January 25 

Are Continuing Teachers "Newly Appointed"? 
February 63 

How Many Jobs May Members Fill? 

When Does Prelude Begin and End? 
March 99 

Should Juniors Take Genealogy? 

What about Class Examinations? 

Is Viewing the Conference on TV Permissable? 

How Is a 2y 2 -Minute Talk Ended? 

When Can Enlistment Contacts Be Reported? 
April :... 134 

Are Ward Funds Used for Library Aids? 

Can Courses of Study Be Changed? 
May 176 

Should Congregation Cite Gem Reference? 

Do Bishoprics and Superintendencies Meet 
Regularly? 

Who Can Change Worship Service? 
June 213 

Are Class Officers Elected? 

Is "the" Proper To Use with "Heavenly Father"? 

July - 255 

Are Teachers Set Apart? 

Where Does Hymn Practice Come? 

August 291 

When Does Course la Advance? 
Who Oversees the Sacrament? 
When May Junior Sunday School Members 
Testify? 

September 327 

Should All Classes Take Genealogy? 

October 363 

Who May Pray in Sunday School? 

May Sunday School Classes Have Outside Parties? 

How May Class Parties Be Financed? 

November 401 

What Per Cent of Stakes Use Plan 1? 
Does Taking the Sacrament Break the Fast? 

December .448 

Should Sunday Schools Be Opened and Closed 

on Time? 
Which Children Compose Course 2? 

Apples, Blankets, and Gasoline; L. Mark Neuberger 118 

Applications Are Specific, Lorin F. Wheelwright 132 

Application of Theme © 63 Cnvt 4 

Appointments with My Forefathers, 

Veda Porter Mortimer 129 

Are You Living All of Your Life? Melba Glade 336 

Are You Stretching Your Mind? 

Lorin F. Wheelwright Inside front cover, January 

Arrington, Leonard J.; 

Paying the Tenth in Pioneer Days 386 

Art, How To Look at; J. Roman Andrus 82 

As a Detective . . . What I've Learned About Fathers 

and Sons and Greatness; Daniel A. Keeler 122 

Ashton, Wendell J. 

Back cover articles 

January Wings for Your Hopes 

February Two Streets in One 

March Man with a Doctrine 

April He Held His Spear 



454 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

June Tender Heart 

May Whistler's Mother 

July He Did His Homework 

August With Wings or on Foot 

September Warrior's Wisdom 

October With No Crutches 

November Lions Among Men 

December Just an Optimist 

Assignments, How Do You Make Your? George R. Hill. .231 

Atonement, The — A Triumph over Death and Hell; 

William P. Miller 43 

Attendance: How about Children in the Streets? 

David Lawrence McKay 62 

Awakening of the Widow Zarepath, The; 

Gloria Fairweather 50 

"Away in a Manger"; Florence S. Allen 367 



Baptism Is Called a Birth, Orson F. Whitney 73 

Barbour, Florence Newell and Harriet Blanche Jones; 

"My Grandma" (v) 445 

Barn Became "The Barnacle," The; Rose and R. 

Kendall Thomas as told to Harold H. Jenson 260 

Barrett, Ivan J.; The Longest Infantry March in History. 147 

Barron, Howard H.; Tests of Great Faith 10 

Barton, Clinton W.; The Prophets Speak on Chastity ...110 
Bates, A. Parley; Released with Appreciation: 

Ralph B. Keeler 68 

Beauty Inside a Box, Lowell R. Jackson 343 

Beauty, The Quest for; Gerrit de Jong, Jr 164 

Becoming, The Joy of; Robert K. Thomas 100 

"Before I Take the Sacrament," Mary W. Jensen 103 

Behavior, How Do We Change? Reed H. Bradford 318 

Bennett, Archibald F.; 

Sources of Genealogical Information 112 

(c) Inside back cover, March 
Bennett, W. H.; There Are Hidden Blessings in the 

Word of Wisdom, Too 308 

Bennion, Howard S.; Finding Time for Genealogy 154 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; Flowers for Friendship 

(Our Cover) 362 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; Have a Fun Time 250 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; In Thanks for Our Harvest 327 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; Learning To Pray 175 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; Our Cover 

January to March Inside front covers 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; Our First Rocky Mountain 

Sunday School (Our Cover) 132 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; Released with Appreciation: 

Daniel A. Keeler 68 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; The Manti Temple 213 

Bennion, Kenneth S.; There Is Power in Humility 172 

Bennion, Lowell L.; Honesty — from Idea to Action 92 

Bennion, Lowell L.; "Jesus the Christ," Part I 

Our Study of "Jesus the Christ" 406 

The Quality of One's Faith 

Greatness in the Kingdom of Heaven 

A Controversial Figure 
Bennion, Lowell L.; "Jesus the Christ," Part II 436 

The Light of the World 

And the Truth Shall Make You Free 

Blindness 

Who Is My Neighbor? 

Bennion, Lowell L.; Joy of Giving, The 124 

Berrett, Golden L.; No Elections in the Church 286 

Betham- Edwards, Matilda; "God Make My Life" (v)....260 
Bickerstaff, H. George; 

Library File References for Articles 17 

Billie and His Dog Shag, Twilla Newbury 332 

Billy Understood, Hazel W. Lewis 392 

Blessings for My Ancestors, Adah Webster Tewes 333 

"Blessing I Give My Child Bless Me, The"; 

Paul Cracroft 262 

Book for Sunday School Musicians, A New; 

Alexander Schreiner 260 

Book of Mormon — Evidence that Jesus Is the Christ, 

The; Francis W. Kirkham 70 



Page 

Book of Mormon: Let's Read the Book of Mormon, 

A. Hamer Reiser ...339 

Book of Mormon: Nephi Fashioning the Plates, 

Paul R. Hoopes Center spread article, June 

Boulton, R. David; What Does Dedication Mean? 420 

Bradford, Reed H. 

Gospel Teaching in the Home Series 

The Open Door 14 

Marriage an Opportunity for Lasting Joy 48 

Choosing Wisely 84 

When Shall I Marry? 142 

A Love That the Grave Could Not Bury .160 

How To Deal with Differences 202 

When Children Come _ 256 

Expectations for Our Children 284 

How Do We Change Behavior? 318 

How Do We Adjust To Our Parental Families? 356 
What Do I Do When My Child Will Not 

Confide in Me? 394 

What Shall I Do When My Child Is Not 

Accepted by His Playmates? .. 440 

Bradford, Reed H.; Man Who Almost Died, The 

©62 Cnvt 29 

Brady, Nicholas and Nahum Tate; "Christmas" 361 

Braley, Burton; "To a Photographer" (v) 171 

Browne, Arthur D.; Released with Appreciation Ill 

Browne, Edna and Arthur D.; The Invited Guest on 

Your Vacation 177 

Browne, Edna Smith, story told to Marie F. Felt; 

Message of Great Importance, A 397 

Buckner, E. LaMar; A Teacher's Testimony © 63 Cnvt 12 

Budget Fund Sunday September 15, George R. Hill 254 

Building Chapels Builds Men, Robert G. Larsen 86 

Building of a Beautiful City, The; Marie F. Felt .209 

Burns, Robert; "The Cotter's Saturday Night" (v) 306 

Burns, Robert; "Tarn O' Shanter" (v) 2 

Burton, Alma P.; Christ's Gospel and Keys Restored .... 76 
Burton, Alma P.; Christ's Gospel and Keys Restored (c) 

Inside back cover, February 

Burton, Marshall T.; His First Missionary Companion.... 162 

But Why? Lucy Picco _ 207 

Butler, Boyd F.; How To Use Compassion in Teaching 328 
"By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know Them"; 

Convention Theme © 63 Cnvt 2 

By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know Them, 

Howard W. Hunter 240 

Byron, Lord; "She Walks in Beauty" (v) 172 



Cameron, J. Elliot; Changing Shadow of Our 

Character, The ___ 346 

Cameron, J. Elliot; 

Who Besides Christ Has Been Resurrected? 53 

Campbell, Jennie; Growing in Spiritual Maturity 80 

"Can I Be Set Apart?" Lynn S. Richards 98 

Cannon, Lucy Grant; You, too, Have Freedom of Choice..225 

Carr, John E.; It Is Still the Spirit that Converts ...182 

Center Picture and Article 

January Adventures of the Spirit 

(President David O. McKay) 

February Zechariah, Prophet to a New Generation 

March Humility — an Attribute of Jesus 

April j The Kirtland Temple 

May Malachi, Prophet of Fulfillment 

June Nephi Fashioning the Plates 

July Zephaniah, Obadiah, and Micah 

August The Lesson from the Potter 

September Pilgrims Going to Church 

October President David O. McKay 

November President Henry D. Moyle 

December Christ and the Fishermen 

Central Feature News, Tracking History in the Desert.. .200 
Chalkboard, You, too, Can Illustrate on the; 

Charles R. Hobbs 144 

Challenge of Free Agency, The; Charles H. Monson ...424 
Changing Shadow of Our Character, The; 

J. Elliot Cameron 346 

Characteristics of the Successful Teacher (c) © 63 Cnvt 13 
Chastity, The Prophets Speak on; Clinton W. Barton ....110 



DECEMBER 1 963 



455 



Page 

Children and Youth Need Understanding, 

Blaine R. Porter 186 

Children, Expectations for Our; Reed H. Bradford 284 

Children: Help Your Child Grow Spiritually, 

Addie L. Swapp 211 

"Children Learn What They Live"; (v) 370 

Children: What Can You Expect? Addie J. Gilmore 39 

Choice: You Don't Change Your Standards, 

A. Theodore Tuttle 8 

Choose Wisely, Reed H. Bradford 84 

Chorister's Herculean Job, The; George R. Hill 51 

Christ and the Fishermen, F. Donald Isbell 

Center spread, December 

Christ Taught How To Pray, Marie F. Felt 169 

Christmas and the Spirit of Christ, David O. McKay ...417 

"Christmas Day" (v) ...... 361 

"Christmas," Nahum Tate and Nicholas Brady (v) 361 

Christ's Gospel and Keys Restored (c) 

Inside back cover, February 

Christ's Gospel and Keys Restored, Alma P. Burton 76 

Church and the Lonely Crowd, The; Joseph N. Symons.348 
Church Coordination and the Family, Richard O. Cowan.415 
Church Correlation for Home Teaching (c) 

Inside back cover, November 

Church Growth: Zion Is Growing, Richard O. Cowan ...227 

Coming Events 25, 63, 99, 135, 176 

212, 255, 291, 326, 363, 401, and 448 

Communication Filters, Virgil B. Smith 268 

Communication Filters, Virgil B. Smith (c) 

_ Inside back cover, July 

Compensation: Law of Compensation, of Retribution 

Constantly Operative; David O. McKay 77 

Conception Level (c) © 62 Cnvt 8 

Convention Summary © 63 Cnvt 29 

Cook, Calvin C; "All Aboard" for Family Adventures ...236 

Cook, Calvin C; What Is a Latter-day Saint? 411 

Cooperative Leadership Can Produce the Fruits of the 

Gospel (c) - c 63 Cnvt, Inside back cover 

Corrected Date and Lesson Chart for 1963, 

Course No. 23 25 

Correction .450 

"Cotter's Saturday Night, The"; Robert Burns (v) 306 

Counseling with the Lord, Monte C. Scoville 104 

Courage Is Rewarding; compiled by Margaret Hopkinson..312 

Courage, It Takes; Anna Johnson 289 

Courage (various poems), Anna Johnson (v) 289 

Course 3 Class Period, The; Lucy Picco 97 

Course 6, The New Manual for 447 

Course 27 Manual Recorded .. 25 

Course in Teacher Training, A; Joseph R. Morrell 297 

Courtship and Marriage, David O. McKay 149 

Covey, Stephen R.; Why Is Man Here? 245 

Cowan, Richard O.; 

Church Coordination and the Family 415 

Cowan, Richard O.; Home Teaching and the Family . .430 

Cowan, Richard O.; Lord's Law of Revenue 375 

Cowan, Richard O.; Lord's Law of Revenue (c) 

Inside back cover, October 

Cowan, Richard O.; Zion Is Growing 227 

Cowley, Matthew; Use the Power of Prayer and the 

Priesthood 310 

Cracroft, Paul; "The Blessings I Give My Child 

Bless Me" : 262 

Cundick, Robert; 

Organ Music To Accompany Sacrament Gems. ...29, 67 

Cuthbert, Derek A.; 

Repentance and a Super Jet-propelled Speedboat... 218 

D 

Daniel Had Courage To Do Right, Marie F. Felt 323 

David and His Harp (picture story) Marie F. Felt 443 

Dayton, Dello G.; Why Were the Saints Persecuted? .... 44 

de Jong, Gerrit, Jr.; Dr. John R. Halliday (abt) ( 444 

de Jong, Gerrit, Jr.; The Quest for Beauty 164 

Dead Sea Scrolls, The; Hugh Nibley .....233 

Deseret Sunday School Union General Board 24, 63, 98, 

135, 176, 213, 253, 290, 339, 363, 401, and 448 
Differences, How To Deal with; Reed H. Bradford 202 



Page 

Dignity and Worth of the Individual, The; 

David O. McKay 41 

Divine Church Restored, The; E. Cecil McGavin 422 

Dixon, H. Aldous; Help Me Teach with Inspiration 26 

Done, G. Byron; Religion Monday through Saturday, too.. 151 
Donner Party: Tracking History in the Desert, 

Central Feature News 200 

Durham, Eudora Widtsoe; Let's Go to School with 

Suzie Jane 368 

Dyer, Alvin R.; Accept the Challenge 30 

Dyer, Alvin R.; That the Earth May Not Be 

Smitten with a Curse (Part I) 126 

Dyer, Alvin R.; That the Earth May Not Be 

Smitten with a Curse (Part II) 275 

E 

Each Has a Mission, Henry D. Moyle 120 

Easter— A Very Special Day, Marie F. Felt 21 

Easter: "He Is Risen," Suggested Easter Worship 

Services; Committee 36 

Effective Ways To Prepare and Preserve Research 

Notes, V. L. Jones 372 

Evans, Richard L.; Spirit of Worship, The 388 

Expanding Worlds of Childhood (c) 40 

Expectation for Our Children, Reed H. Bradford 284 



Fairweather, Gloria; 

The Awakening of the Widow of Zarephath 50 

Faith, Ralph B. Keeler © 62 Cnvt 20 

Family Life: Making a Heaven out of Our Home, 

LeGrand Richards 6 

Faux, Charles; Fellowshiping Through the 

Gospel Essentials Class 362 

Fellowshiping Through the Gospel Essentials Class, 

Charles Faux 362 

Felt, Marie F.; New Opportunity for Service 390 

Felt, Marie F. 
Story series 

Easter — A Very Special Day (flannelboard) .... 21 

When One Door Closes, Another Opens 59 

Humility — an Attribute of Jesus 

Center spread story, March 

The Good Samaritan (flannelboard) 131 

Christ Taught How To Pray (flannelboard) ...169 
The Building of a Beautiful City (flannelboard).. 209 
Joshua, a Great Leader Who Served the 

Lord (flannelboard) 249 

The Sons of Adam and Eve (flannelboard) 287 

Daniel Had Courage To Do Right 

(flannelboard) -323 

Greatest Gift of All, The (flannelboard) 359 

A Message of Great Importance (flannelboard).. 397 

David and His Harp (picture story) 443 

File Your Personal Teaching Aids, Claribel W. Aldous... 168 

Find Family Clues in Parish Registers, Brian Leese 52 

Find the Joy of Forgiving and Repenting, 

A. Hamer Reiser -— 16 

Finding Time for Genealogy, Howard S. Bennion 154 

"First Christmas, The" (v) , 361 

Flowers of Friendship (Our Cover) ; Kenneth S. Bennion.362 
Follow Me, 1963 Convention Film; 

Frank S. Wise © 62 Cnvt 24 

Follow Me. . . . Willis S. Peterson © 62 Cnvt 2 

Follow the Leader, Lorna C. Alder 434 

"Forgiveness," Florence S. Allen 259 

Four Score Years and Ten! (abt) David O. McKay 

Center spread, October 

Freedom, The Quest for; Albert P. Heiner 242 

Freedom To Succeed, Laurence B. Harmon 316 

Fruits as Taught and Exemplified by Jesus, The 

©63 Cnvt 6 

Fruits (or Blessings) to the Sunday School 

Teacher, The © 63 Cnvt 12 

G 

Gardiner, Erma Y.; We Work Together in Our Home... 18 
Gardner, David Ensign; The Harvest Can Be Rich ...264 



456 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

Genealogical Information, Sources of, 

Archibald F. Bennett 112 

(c) Inside back cover, March 

Genealogy: Appointments with My Forefathers, 

Veda Porter Mortimer 129 

Genealogy: Blessings for My Ancestors, 

Adah Webster Tewes 333 

Genealogy Course in Sunday School, The; 

George R. Hill 271 

Genealogy — England, Wales: The Harvest Can Be 

Rich; David Ensign Gardner 264 

Genealogy: Find Family Clues in Parish Registers, 

Brian Leese 52 

Genealogy, Finding Time for: Howard S. Bennion 154 

Genealogy: I Am Responsible for My Ancestors, too; 

Elaine C. Robison 4 

Genealogy: My Urim and Thummim to Scandinavian 

Research, Ivy L. Watson .....194 

Genealogy — Poland: That the Earth May Not Be 

Smitten with a Curse (Part II), Alvin R. Dyer 275 

Genealogy: That the Earth May Not Be Smitten 

with a Curse (Part I), Alvin R. Dyer 126 

Genealogy: What about Electronics in Genealogy? 

C. Derek Harland 272 

General Handbook of Instructions, A; Lynn S. Richards..400 
Getting Course Information to the Parents... © 63 Cnvt 28 

Gilmore, Addie J.; What Can You Expect? 39 

Gilmore, Addie J.; Why Not Course la Each Year? 446 

Giving, The Joy of; Lowell L. Bennion 124 

Glade, Melba; Are You Living All of Your Life? .336 

Goates, Helen Lee; A Letter to a Future Missionary 302 

"God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand," 

Alexander Schreiner 450 

"God Make My Life," Matilda Betham-Edwards (v) 260 

Good and Evil: Two Streets in One, 

Wendell J. Ashton Back cover article, February 

Gospel Living: Maintain Your Standards, 

Milan D. Smith 314 

Gospel Teaching in the Home Series, Reed H. Bradford 

January: The Open Door 14 

February: Marriage, an Opportunity for Lasting Joy 48 

March: Choosing Wisely 84 

April: When Shall I Marry? ...142 

May: A Love That the Grave Could Not Bury 160 

June: How To Deal with Differences 202 

July: When Children Come 256 

August: Expectations for Our Children 284 

September: How Do We Change Behavior? 318 

October: How Do We Adjust To Our Parental 

Families? 356 

November: What Do I Do When My Child 

Will Not Confide in Me? 395 

December: What Shall I Do When My Child 

Is Not Accepted by His Playmates? 440 

Greatest Gift of All, The; Marie F. Felt 359 

Green, Eva May; Released with Appreciation: 

Marion G. Merkley 69 

Greetings Make a Difference, Lucy Picco 23 

Growing in Spiritual Maturity, Jennie Campbell 80 

"Growing Up," Little Rhymes for Little Folks (v) 416 

Growth of the Sunday School, The; George R. Hill 35 

Guidance from Our Prophets, Francis L. Urry 320 

H 

Habits of Today Build the Person of Tomorrow, 

George R. Hill 399 

Halliday, Dr. John R. (abt); Gerrit de Jong, Jr 444 

Halliday, John R., (abt), Meet Your New Board 

Members; Lowell R. Jackson ...106 

Harland, C. Derek; What about Electronics in 

Genealogy? _ 272 

Harmon, Laurence B.; Freedom To Succeed 316 

Hartshorn, Leon; May I Teach with Color 421 

Harvest Can Be Rich, The; David Ensign Gardner 264 



Page 

Hatch, Nelle Spilsbury; 

When Villa Bypassed the Mormons 108 

Hayward, Ira N.; The Scout Who Rode with God 158 

He Accepted the Challenge; Lynn S. Richards; 

(abt) Marion G. Merkley 334 

He Changes His Students' Lives; by Secretary and 

Students of Harvey L. Taylor 56 

He Did His Homework, Wendell J. Ashton 

- Back cover article, July 

He Held His Spear, Wendell J. Ashton 

- Back cover article, April 

"He Is Risen," Suggested Easter Worship Service 36 

Health: But Why? Lucy Picco 207 

Health: Mental and Physical Health, R. DeVerl Willey..214 

Heiner, Albert P.; The Quest for Freedom 242 

"Help Me Teach with Inspiration," (c) 

Lorin F. Wheelwright .... © 62 Cnvt, Inside back cover 

Help Me Teach with Inspiration, H. Aldous Dixon ..<. 26 

Help Your Child Grow Spiritually, Addie L. Swapp 211 

Here Is Honesty in Action, Janise J. and 

Arthur S. Anderson 116 

Hill, George R.; Budget Fund Sunday September 15.. 254 

Hill, George R.; Chorister's Herculean Job, The 51 

Hill, George R.; Genealogy Course in Sunday 

School, The 271 

Hill, George R.; Growth of Sunday School, The 35 

Hill, George R.; Habits of Today Build the Person 

of Tomorrow 399 

Hill, George R.; How Do You Make Your Assignments?..231 
Hill, George R.; Love, an Essential for Every 

Sunday School 376 

Hill, George R.; Motivating Power of Love and 

Enthusiasm, The 94 

Hill, George R.; Opportunity of the Junior 

Sunday School, The 326 

Hill, George R.; Peace Is a Powerful Word 435 

Hill, George R.; Power to Stand Firm, The 191 

Hill, George R.; Prepare for Teacher Training 254 

Hill, George R.; "She Needs Me" 325 

Hill, George R.; Sunday School of 1963, The 134 

Hill, George R.; Sunday School Songs of Yesteryear 115 

Hill, George R.; Superintendent's Responsibility for 

Reverence in the Worship Service, The 24 

His First Missionary Companion, Marshall T. Burton ....162 
Hobbs, Charles R.; You, too, Can Illustrate on the 

Chalkboard 144 

"Holy Temples on Mount Zion," Alexander Schreiner.. ..258 
Home and Church Can Be a Teaching Team, The; 

Margaret I. Kitto .370 

Home Teaching and the Family, Richard O. Cowan 430 

Homes that Children Cherish, Paul R. Hoopes 136 

Honesty — from Idea to Action, Lowell L. Bennion 92 

Hoopes, Paul R.; A Boy and His Dog 291 

Hoopes, Paul R. 

Center picture descriptions 

Humility— an Attribute of Jesus March 

Malachi, Prophet of Fulfillment May 

Nephi Fashioning the Plates June 

Zephaniah, Obadiah, and Micah July 

The Lesson from the Potter August 

Pilgrims Going to Church September 

Hoopes, Paul R.; Homes that Children Cherish 136 

Hoopes, Paul R.; Latter-day Saint Temples .303 

Hoopes, Paul R. (excerpter); 

Leadership Is Founded on Loyalty 73 

Hopkinson, Jane; Claribel W. Aldous; and Mary W. 

Jensen; Obedience ©62 Cnvt 18 

Hopkinson, Margaret; Courage Is Rewarding 312 

Hopkinson, Majgaret; Prepare for the Child Who 

Arrives Early 55 

"Hosanna," Florence S. Allen 295 

How about Children in the Streets? 

David Lawrence McKay 62 

How Do We Adjust To Our Parental Families? 

Reed H. Bradford 356 

How Do We Change Behavior? Reed H. Bradford 318 



DECEMBER 1963 



457 



Page 

How Do You Make Your Assignments? George R. Hill .231 

How Jacob Obtained Water, Edith Nash .. 79 

How Sunday Schools Help Members Apply Gospel 

Lesson to Daily Living (c) ... © 62 Cnvt 16 

How the Sunday School and the Home Can Cooperate 

in Applying the Gospel Principles © 63 Cnvt 26 

How To Deal with Differences, Reed H. Bradford 202 

How To Look at Art, J. Roman Andrus 82 

How To Respond to the Over-aggressive Child, 

R. DeVerl Willey 247 

How To State Learning Goals for Action (c) ©62 Cnvt 14 
How To Use Compassion in Teaching, Boyd F. Butler .328 
Humility — an Attribute of Jesus, Marie F. Felt 

_. Center spread story, March 

Humility, There Is Power in; Kenneth S. Bennion 172 

Hunter, Howard W.; By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know 

Them ----- 240 



I Am Responsible for My Ancestors, Too; 

Elaine C. Robison 4 

"I Can Be Helpful," Louise M. Oglevee (v) 416 

I Have a Special Dad, Albert Peter Sieverts, Jr 199 

"I Know that My Redeemer Lives," Mary W. Jensen 181 

I Was a Political Prisoner of Hitler, 

Wallace D. Montague 90 

"In Humility, Our Saviour," Alexander Schreiner 294 

In the Time of the Herodians, Burl Shephard 452 

Indians (American) — Missionaries: Most of All They 

Teach with Love, Roma H. Littlefield 12 

Inner Drives Keep Us Going ©62 Cnvt 11 

Inside Back Cover Charts 

January: Maturity Characteristics of Young Children 

February: Christ's Gospel and Keys Restored 

March: Sources of Genealogical Information 

April: Longest Infantry March in History, The 

May: Maturity Characteristics of Ages 13 to 19 

June: Zion Is Growing 

July: Communication Filters 

August: LDS Temples 1831 to 1963 

September: Seminary Enrollment 1953-54 and 1962-63 

October: Lord's Law of Revenue, The 

November: Church Correlation for Home Teaching 

December: Sing with Spirit . . . and with Understanding 
Inspired Teachers Plan Gospel Lessons That Move 

People To Follow Jesus ©62 Cnvt 12 

Instructor staff 5, 45, 80, 117, 153, 190, 

232, 270, 309, 345, 381, and 421 
Interested Teachers Are Interesting, 

Lorin F. Wheelwright .... 338 

Invited Guest on Your Vacation, The; 

Edna and Arthur D. Browne 177 

Isaksen, Henry L. (abt), Released with Appreciation; 

Arthur D. Browne — Ill 

Isbell, F. Donald; Christ and the Fishermen 

_ Center spread, December 

It Is Still the Spirit That Converts, John E. Carr 182 

"It May Not Be on the Mountain Height," 

Alexander Schreiner 138 

"It Takes Courage," Anna Johnson (v) 289 



Jackson, Lowell R.; Beauty Inside a Box 343 

Jackson, Lowell R.; Meet Your New Board Members: 

James R. Halliday and James R. Tolman 106 

"Jehovah, Lord of Heaven and Earth," 

Alexander Schreiner 102 

Jensen, Mary W.; Claribel W. Aldous; and Jane 

Hopkinson; Obedience © 62 Cnvt 18 

Jensen, Mary W. 

Junior Sunday School hymn of the month series 

"The Sacrament" 29 

"Love at Home" 67 

"Before I Take the Sacrament" -103 

"My Tithing Gives Me Happiness" 139 

"I Know that My Redeemer Lives" ...181 

Jenson, Harold H. (as told to) , « 

The Barn Became "The Barnacle" 260 

Jesus Christ — Atonement: The Atonement— a Triumph 

Over Death and Hell, William P. Miller 43 

"Jesus the Christ," Part I, Lowell L. Bennion 



Page 

Our Study of "Jesus the Christ" 406 

The Quality of One's Faith 
Greatness in the Kingdom of Heaven 
A Controversial Figure 
"Jesus the Christ," Part II, Lowell L. Bennion 

The Light of the World 436 

And the Truth Shall Make You Free 
Blindness 

Who Is My Neighbour? 
Jews — Dispersion and Gathering: 

A Second Gathering Place, LeGrand Richards 156 

John, LaVerd; Juvenile Protection ... By Whom? 

. . . From What? 350 

John Taylor Family Has Organized for Posterity, The; 

Frank C. Taylor 428 

Johnson, Anna; It Takes Courage 289 

Johnson, Anna; poems on courage (v) 289 

Johnson, Clair W.; Sing with Spirit and with 

Understanding 468 

Jones, Harriet Blanche and Florence Newell Barbour; 

"My Grandma" (v) 445 

Jones, V. L.; Effective Ways To Prepare and 

Preserve Research Notes 372 

Joshua, a Great Leader Who Served the Lord, 

Marie F. Felt -249 

Joy of Becoming, The; Robert K. Thomas .100 

Joy of Giving, The; Lowell L. Bennion 124 

Junior Sunday School article series 

Greetings Make a Difference, Lucy Picco 23 

Prepare for the Child Who Arrives Early, 

Margaret Hopkinson 55 

The Course 3 Class Period, Lucy Picco 97 

New Horizons for Teacher Service, 

Claribel W. Aldous 133 

File Your Personal Teaching Aids, 

Claribel W. Aldous 168 

Help Your Children Grow Spiritually, 

Addie L. Swapp 211 

The Home and Church Can Be a Teaching Team, 

Margaret Ipson Kitto 370 

Why Not Course la Each Year? 

Addie J. Gilmore 447 

Junior Sunday School hymn of the month series 
Mary W. Jensen 

March: "The Sacrament" 29 

April: "Love at Home" 67 

May: "Before I Take the Sacrament" .103 

June: "My Tithing Gives Me Happiness" 139 

July: "I Know that My Redeemer Lives" 181 

Florence S. Allen 

August: "Sweet Sabbath Day" - 217 

September: "Forgiveness" 259 

October: "Hosanna" 295 

November: "Lord We Thank Thee" 330 

December: "Away in a Manger" 367 

January: "Sweet Is the Work, 

My God, My King" 405 

February: "While I Drink the Water Clear" ...451 

"Just an Optimist," Wendell J. Ashton .440 

Juvenile Protection ... By Whom? ... 

From What?; LaVerd John 350 

K 

Keeler, Daniel A. (abt) , Released with Appreciation; 

Kenneth S. Bennion 68 

Keeler, Daniel A.; What I've Learned about Fathers 

and Sons and Greatness 122 

Keeler, Ralph B. and Lorin F. Wheelwright; The 

Learning Goal Should Fit the Learning Level 

and the Age Level of Students © 62 Cnvt 15 

Keeler, Ralph B. (abt), Released with Appreciation; 

A. Parley Bates 68 

Keeler, Ralph B.; Faith ©62 Cnvt 20 

Kirkham, Francis W.; The Book of Mormon — 

Evidence that Jesus Is the Christ 70 

Kirtland Temple, The; G. Robert Ruff 

Center spread article, April 

Kitto, Margaret I.; Home and Church Can Be a 

Teaching Team, The 370 



458 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

Know Your Class Members, Leland H. Monson 64 

Kuhn, Nellie H., Let Me Pray 226 

Kuhn, Nellie H.; "Talk to Your Heavenly Father" (v)....227 



Larsen, Robert G.; Building Chapels Builds Men .. 86 

Latter-day Prophets Receive Revelation Today, 

Joseph Fielding Smith, Jr 382 

Latter-day Saint Temples, Paul R. Hoopes 303 

Latter-day Saints Love Music, Lorin F. Wheelwright 354 

Law of Compensation, of Retribution Constantly 

Operative, David O. McKay 77 

Laws I Can Obey (v), Lucy Picco © 62 Cnvt 19 

LDS Church Schools Today 340 

LDS Temples, 1831 to 1963; Virgil B. Smith (c) 

Inside back cover, August 

LeFevre, Don; A Mormon Star Shines in the Big 

Leagues 238 

Leadership Is Founded on Loyalty, David O. McKay 

(excerpted by Paul R. Hoopes) 72 

Learning Goal Should Fit the Learning Level and 

the Age Level of Students, The; Ralph B. 

Keeler and Lorin F. Wheelwright © 62 Cnvt 15 

Lee, Harold B.; Teaching the Gospel To Inspire 

Christlike Living 220 

Leese, Brian; Find Family Clues in Parish Registers .... 52 

Leitner, Delia Adams; "A Prayer for Leaders" (v) 135 

Lesson, Aim, The; David 0. McKay 

©62 Cnvt, Outside back cover 

Lesson from the Potter, The; Paul R. Hoopes 

Center spread, August 

Let Me Pray, Nellie H Kuhn 226 

Let Trouble Help You Grow, 

D. Sterling Wheelwright 282 

Let Your Music Sound Natural, Alexander Schreiner ...180 

Let Your Teaching Be Inspiring, Sterling Provost 364 

Let's Go To School with Suzie Jane, 

Eudora Widtsoe Durham 368 

Let's Read the Book of Mormon, A. Hamer Reiser 339 

Let's Take an Overall Look at Our Vineyard (c) 

© 63 Cnvt 9 

Letter to a Future Missionary, A; 

Helen Lee Goates 302 

Lewis, Hazel W.; Billy Understood 392 

Library File References for Articles, 

H. George Bickerstaff 17 

Library, Sunday School, The; J. Holman Waters 174 

Life Eternal, Arthur S. Anderson and 

Oscar W. McConkie, Jr 432 

Lions Among Men, Wendell J. Ashton 

Back cover, November 

"Little," Dorothy Aldis (v) 416 

Littlefield, Roma H.; Most of All They Teach with Love.. 12 

Living: Our Books of Life, Leland H. Monson 171 

Living Tributes to Mother; Committee 72 

(Suggested Mother's Day Programs) 
Longest Infantry March in History, The; Ivan J. Barrett .147 
Longest Infantry March in History, The; 

Ivan J. Barrett (c) Inside back cover, April 

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 

"Morituri Salutamus" (v) 113 

"Lord We Thank Thee," Florence S. Allen 331 

Lord's Law of Revenue, The; Richard O. Cowan 375 

Lord's Law of Revenue, The (c) 

Inside back cover, October 

Lord's Sacrament, The; David O. McKay 305 

Love, An Essential for Every Sunday School; 

George R. Hill 376 

Love at Home, Mary W. Jensen 67 

Love Is Service, Too; Richard E. Scholle 398 

Love that the Grave Could Not Bury, A; 

Reed H. Bradford 160 

Love Your Enemies, Leland H. Monson © 62 Cnvt 22 

Lure of Counterfeit Treasure, The; 

Lorin F. Wheelwright _ 277 

M 

Madsen, Truman G.; Whence Cometh Man? 204 

Maintain Your Standards, Milan D. Smith .314 

Making a Heaven out of Our Home, LeGrand Richards... 6 



Page 

Malachi, Prophet of Fulfillment; Ellis T. Rasmussen 

Center spread article, May 

Man Who Almost Died, The; Reed H. Bradford 

©62 Cnvt 29 

Man with a Doctrine, Wendell J. Ashton 

Back cover article, March 

Marriage an Opportunity for Lasting Joy, 

Reed H. Bradford 48 

Maturity Characteristics of Ages 9 to 12 (c) 188 

Maturity Characteristics of Ages 13 to 19 (c) 

Inside back cover, May 

Maturity Characteristics of Young Children (c) 

Inside back cover, January 

May I Teach with Color, Leon Hartshorn 421 

McConkie, Don L.; Add Parents to Our Teaching Team. 292 
McConkie, Oscar W., Jr., and Arthur S. Anderson; 

Life Eternal 432 

McGavin, E. Cecil; Divine Church Restored, The 422 

McKay, David Lawrence; Advancement of Courses 446 

McKay, David Lawrence; How about Children in the 

Streets? , 62 

McKay, David O.; Abundant Life the Mission of the 

Church, The \ 1 

McKay, David O. (abt) : Adventures of the Spirit, 

Lorin F. Wheelwright Center spread, January 

McKay, David O.; Christmas and the Spirit of Christ ....417 

McKay, David O.; Courtship and Marriage 149 

McKay, David O.; Dignity and Worth of the 

Individual, The 41 

McKay, David O; Law of Compensation, of 

Retribution Constantly Operative 77 

McKay, David O.; Leadership Is Founded on Loyalty 

(excerpted by Paul R. Hoopes) 73 

McKay, David O.; Lesson Aim, The 

©62 Cnvt, Outside back cover 

McKay, David O.; Lord's Sacrament, The 305 

McKay, David O.; Necessity of Repentance 269 

McKay, David O; Ours Is a Rich Heritage 229 

McKay, David O.; True Manhood and Womanhood 341 

McKay, David O.; Two Paramount Obligations of 

Members of the Church 377 

McKay, David O.; Value of True Religion and 

Right Thinking, The 189 

McKay, David O.; Youth and the Five Faiths 

which Concern Them 113 

Meet Your New Board Members: John R. Halliday 

and James R. Tolman; Lowell R. Jackson 106 

Memorized Recitations for: 

March: Courses 7 and 13 25 

April: Courses 11 and 19 63 

May: Courses 9 and 15 99 

June: Courses 7 and 13 135 

July: Courses 11 and 19 176 

August: Courses 9 and 15 212 

September: Courses 7 and 13 255 

October: Courses 11 and 19 291 

November: Courses 9 and 15 327 

December: Courses 7 and 13 363 

January: Courses 10 and 16 , 401 

February: Courses 8 and 14 448 

Mental and Physical Health, R. DeVerl Willey 214 

Merkley, Marion G. (abt): He Accepted the 

Challenge; Lynn S. Richards 334 

Merkley, Marion G (abt), Released with Appreciation, 

Eva May Green 69 

Message of Great Importance, A; by Edna Smith 

Browne as told to Marie F. Felt 397 

Miller, William P.; The Atonement — 

A Triumph over Death and Hell 43 

Miracles: Use the Power of Prayer and the 

Priesthood, Matthew Cowley 310 

Mission, Each Has a; Henry D. Moyle 120 

Missionaries: A Letter to a Future Missionary, 

Helen Lee Goates 302 

Missionaries: It Is Still the Spirit that Converts, 

John E. Carr 182 



DECEMBER 1 963 



459 



Page 

Mitchell, Hal D.; You Are the Team's Most 

Important Player 192 

Monson, Charles H. Jr.; Challenge of Free Agency, The.,424 
Monson, Leland H.; A Land of Promise, Provided. . . .- 20 
Monson, Leland H.; Adventures of the Spirit 

Center spread, November 

Monson, Leland H.; Know Your Class Members 64 

Monson, Leland H.; Love Your Enemies ©62 Cnvt 22 

Monson, Leland H.; Mormon, A Defender of the Faith..344 
Monson, Leland H.; Our Books of Life 171 

Montague, Wallace D.; 

I Was a Political Prisoner of Hitler 90 

"Morituri Salutamus," Henry Wadsworth 

Longfellow (v) 113 

Mormon, A Defender of the Faith; Leland H. Monson .344 
Mormon Star Shines in the Big Leagues, A; 

Don LeFevre 238 

Mormons, When Villa Bypassed the; 

Nelle Spilsbury Hatch 108 

Morrell, Jennette McKay; "True Christmas Joy" (v> ....442 
Morrell, Joseph R.; A Course in Teacher Training . .297 
Mortimer, Veda Porter; Appointments with My 

Forefathers 129 

Most of All They Teach with Love, Roma H. Littlefield.. 12 
Mother: "Living Tributes to Mother," Suggested 

Mother's Day Worship Services; Committee 72 

Mothers, We Are Honoring; Claribel W. Aldous 95 

Motivating Power of Love and Enthusiasm, The; 

George R. Hill 94 

Mountain, Lee Harrison; Courage Is Rewarding 312 

Moyle, Henry D. (abt); Adventures of the Spirit; 

Leland H. Monson ~ Center spread, November 

Moyle, Henry D.; Each Has a Mission 120 

My Brother's Keeper, John H. Vandenberg 274 

"My Christmas Prayer," Maxine S. Pope 361 

My Family; selected verses compiled by Marie F. Felt... .416 
"My Grandma," Harriet Blanche Jones and 

Florence Newell Barbour (v) 445 

My Personal Witness that Jesus Is the Christ, 

N. Eldon Tanner 280 

"My Tithing Gives Me Happiness," Mary W. Jensen ....139 
My Toddler Taught Me about Death, Betty Clark Ruff.. 61 
My Urim and Thummim to Scandinavian Research, 

Ivy L. Watson 194 

N 

Nash, Edith; How Jacob Obtained Water 79 

Nature of Organ Stops, Part I, The; 

Alexander Schreiner 66 

Nature of Organ Stops, Part II, The; 

Alexander Schreiner .....138 

Nature of Organ Stops, Part III, The; 

Alexander Schreiner 216 

"Navaho Sisters, Good Morning Little" Cover, January 

Necessity of Repentance, David O. McKay 269 

Nelson, Joan; He Changes His Students' Lives 56 

Nephi Fashioning the Plates, Paul R. Hoopes 

Center spread article, June 

Neuberger, L. Mark; Apples, Blankets, and Gasoline 118 

New Book for Sunday School Musicians, A; 

Alexander Schreiner 260 

New Horizons for Teacher Service, Claribel W. Aldous ...133 

New Manual for Course 6, The 447 

New Opportunity for Service, Marie F. Felt 390 

Newbury, Twilla; Billie and His Dog Shag 332 

Nibley, Hugh; The Dead Sea Scrolls 233 

No Elections in the Church, Golden L. Berrett 286 

O 

Oakes, Keith R. (abt), Released with Appreciation; 

Asahel D. Woodruff 68 

Obedience; Claribel W. Aldous, Jane Hopkinson and 

Mary W. Jensen ©62 Cnvt 18 

Objective of the Sunday School, The; Lynn S. Richards .290 
Objectives— 1963 Stake Conference Convention © 63 Cnvt 4 
"Ode: Intimation of Immortality from Recollections 

of Early Childhood," William Wordsworth (v) 61 



Page 

Oglevee, Louise M.; "I Can Be Helpful" (v) 416 

"Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee," 

Lorin F. Wheelwright 251 

Open Door, The; Reed H. Bradford 14 

Opportunity of the Junior Sunday School, The; 

George R. Hill -326 

Organized for Posterity, The John Taylor Family 

Has; Frank C. Taylor 428 

Our Books of Life, Leland H. Monson 171 

Our Cover 

January, Kenneth S. Bennion _ ...Inside front cover 

February, Kenneth S. Bennion Inside front cover 

March, Kenneth S. Bennion Inside front cover 

April, Kenneth S. Bennion 132 

May, Kenneth S. Bennion 175 

June, Kenneth S. Bennion 213 

July, Kenneth S. Bennion 250 

August, Paul R. Hoopes 291 

September, Kenneth S. Bennion 327 

October, Kenneth S. Bennion 362 

November, Richard E. Scholle 398 

December, Richard E. Scholle ...444 

Our Goal: Celestial Glory (c) ©62 Cnvt 6 

Our Lamanite Missionaries. . . . Most of All They 

Teach with Love, Roma H. Littlefield 12 

Ours Is a Rich Heritage, David O. McKay 229 



Packer, Boyd K.; Study Your Students 17 

Parent and Teacher ©62 Cnvt 25 

Paying the Tenth in Pioneer Days, 

Leonard J. Arrington 386 

Peace Is a Powerful Word, George R. Hill 435 

Penrose, Charles W.; "School Thy Feelings" (v) 283 

Perception Level (c) ©62 Cnvt 7 

Persecution: Why Were the Saints Persecuted? 

Dello G. Dayton 44 

Personal Conscience Standard of Values (c) .... © 62 Cnvt 9 

Peterson, Willis S.; Follow Me ©62 Cnvt 2 

Photo and art credits 28, 54, 99, 132, 

170, 191, 241, 296, 324, 358, 393, and 441 

Picco, Lucy; "But Why?" 207 

Picco, Lucy; Greetings Make a Difference 23 

Picco, Lucy; Laws I Can Obey (v) ©62 Cnvt 19 

Picco, Lucy; The Course 3 Class Period 97 

Pilgrims Going to Church, Paul R. Hoopes 

Center spread, September 

Pioneer Stories: How Jacob Obtained Water, Edith Nash 79 

Pioneer Stories: The Scout Who Rode with God, 

Ira N. Hayward 158 

Pioneers Conquered the Land, These; Merlin J. Shaw... .196 
Pioneers— Mormon: Ours Is a Rich Heritage, 

David O. McKay 229 

Pioneers: Utah Plants and the Pioneers, 

Arnold R. Standing 266 

Plants and the Pioneers, Utah; Arnold R. Standing 266 

Poems _ 

"Tarn O' Shanter," Robert Burns 2 

"Resolutions" 23 

"Winds of Fate," Ella Wheeler Wilcox . 48 

"Ode: Intimation of Immortality from Recollections 

of Early Childhood," William Wordsworth 61 

"We Are Seven," William Wordsworth 113 

"Morituri Salutamus," Henry Wadsworth 

Longfellow H3 

"A Prayer for Leaders," Delia Adams Leitner 135 

"To a Photographer," Burton Braley 171 

"She Walks in Beauty," Lord Byron 172 

"Talk to Your Heavenly Father," Nellie H. Kuhn....227 
"God Make My Life," Matilda Betham-Edwards....260 

"School Thy Feelings," Charles W. Penrose 283 

Poems on Courage, Anna Johnson 289 

"The Cotter's Saturday Night," Robert Burns 306 

Patience Strong 315 

Eva Wangsgaard 354 

"To Music," Lorin F. Wheelwright 355 

"Help Me Teach with Inspiration," Lorin F. 

Wheelwright 355 



460 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

"My Christmas Prayer," Maxine S. Pope 361 

"Christmas Day" . 361 

"To Bring God's Love" 361 

"Christmas," Nahum Tate and Nicholas Brady 361 

"The First Christmas" 361 

"Children Learn What They Live" 370 

"When I Think of Christmas" 414 

"Precious Baby" 414 

"I Can Be Helpful" 416 

"Growing Up" 416 

"The Queer Habit" _ 416 

"Little" 416 

"My Grandma" 445 

"True Christmas Joy" 453 

Pope, Maxine S.; "My Christmas Prayer" 361 

Porter, Blaine R.; Children and Youth Need 

Understanding 186 

Power of Example, The (Ten case illustrations) 

©63 Cnvt 14 

Power to Stand Firm, The; George R Hill 191 

Pray, Learning To; Kenneth S. Bennion 175 

Prayer for Leaders, A"; Delia Adams Leitner (v) 135 

Prayer: Let Me Pray, Nellie H. Kuhn 226 

Prayer: Counseling with the Lord, Monte C. Scoville ....104 

"Precious Baby," Jane Bradford Terry (v) 414 

Prelude Is a Call to Worship, The; 

Alexander Schreiner 24 

Premortal Life: My Toddler Taught Me about Death, 

Betty Clark Ruff 61 

Premortal Life: Whence Cometh Man? 

Truman G. Madsen 204 

Prepare for Teacher Training, George R. Hill 254 

Prepare for the Child Who Arrives Early, 

Margaret Hopkinson 55 

Priesthood: Christ's Gospel and Keys Restored, 

Alma P. Burton 76 

Priesthood — Melchizedek: When the Winds Obeyed, 

Clarence D. Taylor 3 

Promissory Notes, Sterling W. Sill 37 

Prophets Speak on Chastity, The; Clinton W. Barton ....110 

Provost, Sterling; Let Your Teaching Be Inspiring 364 

Q 

"Queer Habit, The"; Betty Race (v) 416 

Quest for Beauty, The; Gerrit de Jong, Jr 164 

Quest for Freedom, The; Albert P. Heiner 242 

R 

Race, Betty; "Queer Habit, The" (v) 416 

Rasmussen, Ellis T. 

Center picture articles 

Zechariah, Prophet to a New Generation... February 

Malachi, Prophet of Fulfillment May 

Zephaniah, Obadiah, and Micah July 

Reiser, A. Hamer; Find the Joy of Forgiving and 

Repenting 16 

Reiser, A. Hamer; Let's Read the Book of Mormon 339 

"Rejoice, the Lord Is King," Alexander Schreiner 216 

Released with Appreciation: Daniel A. Keeler; 

Kenneth S. Bennion 68 

Released with Appreciation: Henry L. Isaksen; 

Arthur D. Browne Ill 

Released with Appreciation: Keith R. Oakes; 

Asahel D. Woodruff 68 

Released with Appreciation: Marion G. Merkley; 

Eva May Green 69 

Released with Appreciation: Ralph B. Keeler; 

A. Parley Bates 68 

Released with Appreciation: Ralph D. Thomson; 

J. Holman Waters ...396 



Page 

Religion Monday through Saturday, too; G. Byron Done..l51 
Religion: The Value of True Religion and Right 

Thinking, David O. McKay 189 

Repentance and a Super Jet-propelled Speedboat, 

Derek A. Cuthbert 218 

Repentance . . . and After, Joseph N. Symons 88 

Repentance: Find the Joy of Forgiving and Repenting, 

A. Hamer Reiser 16 

Repentance, Necessity of; David O. McKay 269 

"Resolutions" (v) 23 

Responsibilities of the Successful Teacher.... ©63 Cnvt 13 

Resurrection and Ascension: Easter — a Very Special 

Day, Marie F. Felt 21 

Resurrection: : "He Is Risen," Suggested Easter 

Worship Services; Committee 36 

Resurrection: Who Besides Christ Has Been 

Resurrected, J. Elliot Cameron _ 53 

Reverence: The Superintendent's Responsibility for 

Reverence in the Worship Service, George R. Hill.... 24 
Rewards and Punishments: Promissory Notes, 

Sterling W. Sill 37 

Richards, LeGrand; A Second Gathering Place 156 

Richards, LeGrand; Making a Heaven out of 

Our Home 6 

Richards, Lynn S., Answers to Your Questions Series.. ..25, 
63, 99, 134, 176, 213, 255, 291, 327, 363, 401, and 448 

Richards, Lynn S.; "Can I Be Set Apart?" 98 

Richards, Lynn S.; General Handbook of Instructions ...400 
Richards, Lynn S.; 

He Accepted the Challenge: Marion G. Merkley 334 

Richards, Lynn S.; The Objective of the Sunday School .290 

Richards, Lynn S.; Use Your Stake Board Members 212 

Rickenbacker, Eddie: Warrior's Wisdom, 

Wendell J. Ashton Back cover article, September 

Robison, Elaine C; I Am Responsible for My 

Ancestors, too 4 

Role of Religion in Modern Life, The; James T. Tschudy..380 
Ruff, Betty Clark; My Toddler Taught Me about Death.. 61 
Ruff, G. Robert; The Kirtland Temple 

Center spread article, April 

IJ for Daily Gospel Living, Paul Vorkink 426 



Sacrament, a Memorial to Our Saviour, The; 

Alma Sonne 152 

Sacrament Gems and Music 29, 67, 103, 139, 

181, 217, 259, 295, 331, 367, 405, and 451 

Sacrament Hymn, The; Alexander Schreiner 102 

"Sacrament, The" 29 

Samaritan, The Good; Marie F. Felt 131 

Schoue, Richard E.; A Song of the Heart (Our Cover) ....444 
Scholle, Richard E.; Love Is Service, Too (Our Cover) ...398 

"School Thy Feelings," Charles W. Penrose (v) 283 

Schreiner, Alexander, 

Senior Sunday School hymn of the month series 

"A Mighty Fortress" 28 

"There Is Beauty All Around" 66 

"Jehovah, Lord of Heaven and Earth" 102 

"It May Not Be on the Mountain Height" 138 

"They the Builders of the Nation" 180 

"Rejoice, the Lord Is King" 216 

"Holy Temples on Mount Zion" 258 

"In Humility, Our Saviour" 294 

"What Glorious Scenes Mine Eyes Behold" 330 

"While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks 

by Night" 366 

"A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" 404 

"God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand"....450 

Schreiner, Alexander; A New Book for Sunday 

School Musicians 260 

Schreiner, Alexander; Let Your Music Sound Natural.... 180 

Schreiner, Alexander; Nature of Organ Stops, 

Part I, The 66 



DECEMBER 1963 



461 



Page 

Schreiner, Alexander; Nature of Organ Stops, 

Part II, The ... - 138 

Schreiner, Alexander; Nature of Organ Stops, 

Part III, The - 216 

Schreiner, Alexander; Prelude Is a Call to Worship, The 24 

Schreiner, Alexander; Sacrament Hymn, The 102 

Schreiner, Alexander; Some Hints on Playing the 

Organ Pedals 258 

Scout Who Rode with God, The; Ira N. Hayward .. ...158 

Scoville, Monte C; Counseling with the Lord 104 

Scoville, Monte C ; Teach According to Their 

Own Understanding , 402 

Scriptural Motivation ©63 Cnvt 1 

Second Gathering Place, A; LeGrand Richards .....156 

Self-control: Let Trouble Help You Grow, 

D. Sterling Wheelwright 282 

Selkirk, Minnie E.; Some A-B-C's for Teachers 96 

Seminary Enrollment 1953-54 and 1962-63 (c) 

Inside back cover, September 

Senior Sunday School hymn of the month series, 
Alexander Schreiner 

March: "A Mighty Fortress" 28 

April: "There Is Beauty All Around" 66 

May: "Jehovah, Lord of Heaven and Earth". .102 
June: "It May Not Be on the Mountain 

Height" .. ; 138 

July: "They the Builders of the Nation" 180 

August: "Rejoice, the Lord Is King" 216 

September: "Holy Temples on Mount Zion'\...258 

October: "In Humility, Our Saviour" 294 

November: "What Glorious Scenes Mine 

Eyes Behold" 330 

December: "While Shepherds Watched Their 

Flocks by Night" 366 

January: "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" 404 

February: "God of Our Fathers, Whose 

Almighty Hand" ...450 

Service: Apples, Blankets, and Gasoline, 

L. Mark Neuberger il8 

Shall We Merely Smg Louder? Lorin F. Wheelwright ....213 
Shaw, Merlin J.; These Pioneers Conquered the Land.... 196 

"She Needs Me." George R. Hill 325 

"She Walks in Beauty," Lord Byron (v) 172 

Shephard, Burl; In the Time of the Herodians 452 

Sidwell, Robert W.; Courage Is Rewarding 312 

Sieverts, Albert Peter, Jr.; I Have a Special Dad 199 

Sill, Sterling W.; Promissory Notes 37 

Sing with Spirit and with Understanding, 

Clair W. Johnson 468 

Sing with Spirit and with Understanding (c) 

Inside back cover, December 

Smith, Joseph Fielding, Jr.; Latter-day Prophets 

Receive Revelation Today 382 

Smith, Joseph Fielding, Jr.; Way of Jesus — Way of 

the World (c) ©62 Cnvt 3 

Smith, Milan D.; Maintain Your Standards 314 

Smith, Virgil B.; Communication Filters .268 

(article and chart) 

Smith, Virgil B.; Latter-day Saint Temples (c) 

._ Inside back cover, August 

Snow, Lorenzo; Guidance from Our Prophets, 

Francis L. Urry 320 

Some A-B-C's for Teachers, Minnie E. Selkirk 96 

Some Broader Measures or Evidences (c) (5)63 Cnvt 9 

Some Guidelines in Making Lesson Applications 

©63 Cnvt 24 

Some Hints on Playing the Organ Pedals, 

Alexander Schreiner 258 

Some Thoughts for the Teacher To Ponder... ©63 Cnvt 13 
Sonne, Alma; The Sacrament, a Memorial to 

Our Saviour : 152 

Sons of Adam and Eve, The; Marie F. Felt 287 

Sources of Genealogical Information (c) 

Inside back cover, March 

Sources of Genealogical Information, 

Archibald F. Bennett 112 



Page 

Specific Blessings or Fruits Available through Dedicated 

Membership in Christ's Restored Church © 63 Cnvt 7 
Spirit of Christmas (Selected Poems); 

Compiled by Margaret Hopkinson 361 

Spirit of Worship, The; Richard L. Evans 388 

Spiritual Preparation for Teaching, 

Lorin F. Wheelwright .. .391 

Standing, Arnold R.; Utah Plants and the Pioneers 266 

Stewart, John J.; Superstitions, Manifestations of 

Darkness 278 

Study Your Students, Boyd K. Packer 17 

Success: Wings for Your Hopes, Wendell J. Ashton 

Back cover article, January 

Submission to Secular Authority; N. Eldon Tanner 352 

Suggested Easter Worship Services: 

"He Is Risen," Committee 36 

Suggested Lessons for Stake Conference Sunday 

Second quarter, 1963: The Atonement — A Triumph 

over Death and Hell, William P. Miller 43 

Third quarter, 1963: Our Books of Life, 

Leland H. Monson^ 171 

Fourth quarter, 1963: Are You Living All of 

Your Life? Melba Glade 336 

First quarter, 1964: Latter-day Prophets Receive 

Revelation Today, Joseph Fielding Smith, Jr 382 

Suggested Mother's Day Worship Services: 

"Living Tributes to Mother"; Committee 72 

Summary, Lorin F. Wheelwright ©62 Cnvt 28 

Sunday School and the Home, The ©63 Cnvt 27 

Sunday School Library, The; J. Holman Waters 174 

Sunday School of 1963, The; George R. Hill 134 

Sunday School: Our First Rocky Mountain Sunday 

School, Kenneth S. Bennion 132 

Sunday School Songs of Yesteryear, George R. Hill 115 

Sunday School's Opportunity and Responsibility To 

Produce the Fruits, The ©63 Cnvt 8 

Sunday School's Responsibilities To Assist Gospel 

Teaching in the Home, The ©63 Cnvt 5 

Sunday School's Special Setting, The ©63 Cnvt 10 

Superintendent's Responsibility for Reverence in the 

Worship Service, The; George R. Hill 24 

Superstitions, Manifestations of Darkness; 

John J. Stewart 278 

Swapp, Addie L.; Help Your Child Grow Spiritually ....211 
Swapp, Addie L.; When We Are Sleeping and 

Awakening 140 

"Sweet Sabbath Day," Florence S. Allen 217 

Symons, Joseph N.; Church and the Lonely Crowd, The..348 
Symons, Joseph N.; Repentance . . . and After 88 



"Talk to Your Heavenly Father," Nellie H. Kuhn (v)....227 

"Tam O' Shanter," Robert Burns (v) 2 

Tanner, N. Eldon; Another Teacher's Testimony 

©63 Cnvt 12 

Tanner, N. Eldon; My Personal Witness that 

Jesus Is the Christ 280 

Tanner, N. Eldon; Submission to Secular Authority 352 

Tate, Nahum and Nicholas Brady; "Christmas" (v) 361 

Taylor, Clarence D.; When the Winds Obeyed 3 

Taylor, Frank C; John Taylor Family Has Organized 

for Posterity, The 428 

Taylor, Harvey L. (abt) : Help Me Teach with 

Inspiration, H. Aldous Dixon 26 

Taylor, Harvey L. (abt) : He Changes His Students' 

Lives, Secretary and Students of Harvey L. Taylor.. 56 
Teach According to Their Own Understanding, 

Monte E. Scoville 402 

Teach Correct Principles ©63 Cnvt 19 

Teacher Service, New Horizons for; Claribel WT Aldous.. 133 
Teachers and Teaching: A Course in Teacher Training, 

Joseph R. Morrell 297 

Teachers and Teachings: Add Parents to Our 

Teaching Team, Don L. McConkie 292 

Teachers and Teaching: Answering Questions with 

Questions, Lorin F. Wheelwright 175 

Teachers and Teaching: By Their Fruits Ye Shall 

Know Them, Howard W. Hunter 240 

Teachers and Teaching: He Changes His Students' 

Lives, Secretary and Students of Harvey L. Taylor.. 56 



462 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

Teachers and Teaching: Help Me Teach with 

Inspiration, H. Aldous Dixon 26 

Teachers and Teaching: How To Respond to the 

Over- aggressive Child, R. DeVerl Willey 247 

Teachers and Teaching: Interested Teachers Are 

Interesting, Lorin F. Wheelwright _ 338 

Teachers and Teaching: Know Your Class Members, 

Leland H. Monson 64 

Teachers and Teaching: "She Needs Me," 

George R. Hill 325 

Teachers and Teaching: Study Your Students, 

Boyd K. Packer 17 

Teachers and Teachings: The Joy of Giving, 

Lowell L. Bennion 124 

Teachers and Teaching: Treasures of Eternity, 

Claribel W. Aldous 46 

Teachers and Teaching: We Work Together in Our 

Home, Erma Y. Gardiner . 18 

Teachers and Teaching: When We Are Sleeping and 

Awakening, Addie L. Swapp 140 

Teacher Improvement Lessons for 

March: Help Me Teach with Inspiration, 

H. Aldous Dixon 26 

April: He Changes His Students' Lives, 

Secretary and Students of Harvey L. Taylor... 56 
May: Growing in Spiritual Maturity, 

Jennie Campbell 80 

June: You, too, Can Illustrate on the Chalkboard, 

Charles R. Hobbs 144 

July: There Is Power in Humility, 

Kenneth S. Bennion 172 

August: Teaching the Gospel To Inspire 

Christlike Living, Harold B. Lee 220 

September: How To Respond to the Over- 
aggressive Child, R. DeVerl Willey 247 

October: Add Parents to Our Teaching Team, 

Don L. McConkie 293 

November: How To Use Compassion in Teaching, 

Boyd Butler 328 

December: Let Your Teaching Be Inspiring, 

Sterling Provost 365 

January: Teach According to Their Own 

Understanding, Monte C. Scoville 402 

February: May I Teach with Color, 

Leon Hartshorn 452 

Teacher's Opportunity and Responsibility To Produce 

the Fruits, The ©63 Cnvt 11 

Teacher's Testimony, A; E. LaMar Buckner.. (5)63 Cnvt 12 
Teaching: Growing in Spiritual Maturity, 

Jennie Campbell 80 

Teaching: Some A-B-C's for Teachers, 

Minnie E. Selkirk 96 

Teaching Techniques That Help Produce the Fruits 

- © 63 Cnvt 20 

Teaching the Gospel To Inspire Christlike Living, 

Harold B. Lee 220 

Teamwork: You Are the Team's Most Important 

Player, Hal D. Mitchell 192 

Temple, Manti, The; Kenneth S. Bennion 213 

Tender Heart, Wendell J. Ashton....Back cover article, June 

Terry, Jane Bradford; "Precious Baby" (v) 414 

Terry, Jane Bradford; "When I Think of 

Christmas" (v) 414 

Testimony: My Personal Witness that Jesus Is the 

Christ, N. Eldon Tanner 280 

Tests of Great Faith, Howard H. Barron 10 

Tewes, Adah Webster; Blessings for My Ancestors 333 

Thanksgiving: In Thanks for Our Harvest, 

Kenneth S. Bennion 327 

That the Earth May Not Be Smitten with a Curse, 

Part I; Alvin R. Dyer 126 

That the Earth May Not Be Smitten with a Curse, 

Part II; Alvin R. Dyer 275 

There Are Hidden Blessings in the Word of Wisdom, 

Too; W. H. Bennett 308 

"There Is Beauty All Around," Alexander Schreiner 66 

There Is Power in Humility, Kenneth S. Bennion 172 

"They the Builders of the Nation," Alexander Schreiner 180 

Thomas, Robert K.; The Joy of Becoming 100 

Thomas, Rose and R. Kendall, as told to Harold H. 

Jenson; The Barn Became "The Barnacle" 260 

Thomson, Ralph D. (abt), Released with Appreciation; 

J. Holman Waters .,... 396 



Page 

Thorough Knowledge of the Gospel, A ©63 Cnvt 18 

Tithing: Lord's Law of Revenue 

- Inside back cover, October 

Titles and Dates of Sunday School Lessons by Courses 

Second quarter, 1963 74 

Third quarter, 1963 184 

Fourth quarter, 1963 300 

First quarter, 1964 .. 412 

"To a Photographer," Burton Braley (v) 171 

"To Bring God's Love" (v) 361 

To Kindle Another, Lorin F. Wheelwright 449 

"To Music," Lorin F. Wheelwright (v) 355 

To Teach the Gospel of Jesus Christ to Every 

Member of the Church ©63 Cnvt 8 

Tolman, James R. (abt) , Meet Your New Board 

Members 107 

Tracking History in the Desert; Central Feature News... .201 

Treasures of Eternity, Claribel W. Aldous 46 

Trials: Tests of Great Faith, Howard H. Barron 10 

Troubled Question — an Opportunity, The; 

Lorin F. Wheelwright Inside front cover, February 

"True Christmas Joy," Jennette McKay Morrell (v) 442 

True Manhood and Womanhood, David O. McKay 341 

Tschudy, James T.; Role of Religion in Modern Life ...380 
Tuttle, A. Theodore; You Don't Change Your Standards 8 
Two Paramount Obligations of Members of the Church, 

David O McKay 277 

Two Streets in One, Wendell J. Ashton 

Back cover article, February 

U 

Understanding of Those To Be Taught ©63 Cnvt 18 

Unified Church School System, LDS Church 

Schools Today 340 

Unto You Is Born a Saviour; Committee 358 

Urry, Francis L.; Guidance from Our Prophets 320 

Use the Power of Prayer and the Priesthood, 

Matthew Cowley 310 

Use Your Stake Board Members, Lynn S. Richards 212 

Utah Plants and the Pioneers, Arnold R. Standing 266 



Vacation, Invited Guest on Your, The 

Edna and Arthur D. Browne 177 

Value of True Religion and Right Thinking, The; 

David O. McKay 189 

Values: The Lure of Counterfeit Treasure, 

Lorin F. Wheelwright 277 

Vandenberg, John H.; My Brother's Keeper 274 

Vorkink, Paul; 3 for Daily Gospel Living 426 

W 

Warrior's Wisdom, Wendell J. Ashton 

Back cover article, September 

Waters, J. Holman; Released with Appreciation: 

Ralph D. Thomson 396 

Waters, J. Holman; Sunday School Library, The 174 

Watson, Ivy L.; My Urim and Thummim to 

Scandinavian Research 194 

Way of Jesus — Way of the World (c) 

Joseph Fielding Smith, Jr ©62 Cnvt 3 

We Act under Pressure To Achieve Goals; 

Lorin F. Wheelwright (5)62 Cnvt 10 

We Are Honoring Mothers, Claribel W. Aldous 95 

"We Are Seven," William Wordsworth (v) 113 

We Celebrate His Birth, Claribel W. Aldous 414 

We Follow Jesus by Learning and Living 

His Gospel (c) ©62 Cnvt 6 

We Organize Impressions Into Ideas ©62 Cnvt 8 

We Should Inspire Others To Follow Jesus (c) 

© 62 Cnvt 5 

We Weigh Ideas To Determine Goals ©62 Cnvt 9 

We Work Together in Our Home, Erma Y. Gardiner 18 

Welfare Program: My Brother's Keeper, 

John H. Vandenberg 274 

What about Electronics in Genealogy? 

C. Derek Harland 272 

What Are the Fruits of the Gospel? ©63 Cnvt 6 

What Are These Techniques? (Ten case illustrations) 

©63 Cnvt 21 

What Can You Expect? Addie J. Gilmore 39 



DECEMBER 1963 



463 



Page 

What Do I Do When My Child Will Not Confide 

in Me? Reed H. Bradford 394 

What Does Dedication Mean? R. David Boulton 420 

"What Glorious Scenes Mine Eyes Behold," 

Alexander Schreiner 330 

What Is a Latter-day Saint? Calvin C. Cook 411 

What Shall I Do When My Child Is Not Accepted 

by His Playmates? Reed H. Bradford 440 

Wheelwright, D. Sterling; Let Trouble Help You Grow..282 
Wheelwright, Lorin F. and Ralph B. Keeler; The 
Learning Goal Should Fit the Learning Level 

and the Age Level of Students.. © 62 Cnvt 15 

Wheelwright, Lorin F. 

Center picture article 

Adventures of the Spirit 

(President David O. McKay) January 

Wheelwright, Lorin F.; "Help Me Teach with 

Inspiration" ©62 Cnvt, Inside back cover 

Wheelwright, Lorin F. 

Inside Front Cover Editorials 

Are You Stretching Your Mind? January 

The Troubled Question — an Opportunity.. February 

The Acid Test of Deeds March 

Wheelwright, Lorin F. 
Instructor editorials 

Applications Are Specific 132 

Answering Questions with Questions 175 

Shall We Merely Sing Louder 213 

Pioneering Is Finding Our Trail 250 

The Lure of Counterfeit Treasure 277 

Interested Teachers Are Interesting 338 

Ambition's Nobler Way 355 

Spiritual Preparation for Teaching 391 

We Must First Glow 449 

Wheelwright, Lorin F.; Latter-day Saints Love Music ...354 
Wheelwright, Lorin F.; 

"Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee" 251 

Wheelwright, Lorin F.; 

"Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee" (v) 253 

Wheelwright, Lorin F.; Summary ©62 Cnvt 28 

Wheelwright, Lorin F.; "To Music" (v) 355 

Wheelwright, Lorin F.; We Act under Pressure To 

Achieve Goals ©62 Cnvt 10 

When Children Come, Reed H. Bradford 257 

"When I Think of Christmas," Jane Bradford Terry (v)..414 
When One Door Closes Another Opens, Marie F. Felt .... 59 

When Shall I Marry? Reed H. Bradford 142 

When the Winds Obeyed, Clarence D. Taylor 3 

When There's Love at Home, Alexander Schreiner 66 

When We Are Sleeping and Awakening, Addie L. Swapp.140 
When Villa Bypassed the Mormons, 

Nelle Spilsbury Hatch 108 

Whence Cometh Man? Truman G. Madsen 204 

"While I Drink the Water Clear," Florence S. Allen ...451 
"While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks," 

Alexander Schreiner 366 

Whistler's Mother, Wendell J. Ashton 

Back cover article, May 

Whitney, Orson F.; Baptism Is Called a Birth 73 

Who Besides Christ Has Been Resurrected? 

J. Elliot Cameron 53 

Why Is Man Here? Stephen R. Covey 245 

Why Not Course la Each Year? Addie J. Gilmore 447 

Why Were the Saints Persecuted? Dello G. Dayton 44 

Wilcox, Ella Wheeler; "Winds of Fate" (v) 48 

Willey, R. DeVerl; How To Respond to the Over- 
aggressive Child 247 

Willey, R. DeVerl; Mental and Physical Health 214 

"Winds of Fate," Ella Wheeler Wilcox (v) 48 

Wings for Your Hopes, Wendell J. Ashton 

Back cover article, January 

Wise, Frank S.; Follow Me, 1963 Convention Film 

©62 Cnvt 24 

With No Crutches, Wendell J. Ashton 

Back cover article, October 

With Wings or on Foot, Wendell J. Ashton 

Back cover article, August 

Woodruff, Asahel D.; Maturity Characteristics of 

Young Children Inside back cover, January 

Woodruff, Asahel D.; Released with Appreciation: 

Keith R. Oakes 68 



Page 

Word of Wisdom, too, There Are Hidden Blessings 

in the; W. H. Bennett 308 

Wordsworth, William; "Ode: Intimation of Immortality 

from Recollections of Early Childhood" (v) 61 

Wordsworth, William; "We Are Seven" (v) 113 

Working Cooperatively ©63 Cnvt 27 

Worship: "Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee," 

Lorin F. Wheelwright 251 



You Are the Team's Most Important Player, 

Hal D. Mitchell 192 

You Don't Change Your Standards, A. Theodore Tuttle 8 
You, too, Can Illustrate on the Chalkboard; 

Charles R. Hobbs 144 

You, too, Have Freedom of Choice; Lucy Grant Cannon.. 225 
Youth and the Five Faiths which Concern Them, 

David O. McKay 113 

Youth: Children and Youth Need Understanding, 

Blaine R. Porter 186 

Youth: The Power to Stand Firm, George R. Hill 191 



Zechariah, Prophet to a New Generation; 

Ellis T. Rasmussen Center spread, February 

Zephaniah, Obadiah, and Micah, Prophets During 

Times of Crises; Ellis T. Rasmussen 

Center spread, July 

Zion Is Growing (c) Inside back cover, June 

Zion Is Growing, Richard O. Cowan 227 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

A 

Advancement Chart for Jan. 5, 1964 (c) 447 

Alexander the Great Back cover, April 

Along Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia: 

Browne Family vacation 177 

USS Arizona in collision with iceberg 3 

Art Exhibit — persons view a painting 82 

B 

Baby receiving name and blessing 262 

Banks, JoAnn and JoEll (twin daughters of 

Brother and Sister Wayne H. Banks) ...Cover, January 

"The Barnacle"— A brick barn 261 

"The Barnacle" — Interior view of stage ....261 

"The Barnacle" — Main floor and balcony 261 

"The Barnacle" — stage scene 261 

Bennion, Lowell L. 439 

Books on sleeping and awakening 141 

Boy and dog wrapped in blankets and sitting by stove.. .332 

Boy and His Dog, A Cover, August 

Boy and girl in water Cover, July 

Boy and girl walking together 64 

Boy and girl with arms folded 388 

Boy and mother 434 

Boy and playmates 440 

Boy brushing hair 188 

Boy building windmill with tinker toys 65 

Boy in contemplation 101 

Boy in deep thought 328 

Boy in tree-house, two boys below 312 

Boy looking at father through magnifying glass 188 

Boy playing in yard - 136 

Boy pulling on girl's pigtail 65 

Boy reading book on tilted chair 188 

Boy reading book; thoughts of Alma meeting 

Amlici in background 162 

Boy running to mother 64 

Boy scowling 64 

Boy straightening up bedroom (cartoon) 19 

Boy watching bee on flower 65 

Boy with flexed bicep - 188 

Boy with his conscience whispering in his ear 218 

Boys giving Christmas gifts 442 



464 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

Bridal couple „.-. - 356 

Buggies moving across wasteland 321 

Building of a Beautiful City, The (Salt Lake City) 

(flannelgraphs) ...Center spread, June 



Calder, Janet 58 

Camera crew in action 320 

Canadian House of Parliament: 

Browne Family vacation 179 

Cave near Dead Sea 234 

Chain, broken in two 242 

Chains around a person's wrists 318 

Chalkboard facial characters ...144-146 

Chapel (LDS) of yesteryear; buggies outside 115 

Chapels under construction (four photographs) 86 

Chapman, Conway 317 

Characteristics of Children up to Eight (c) 38 

Child being greeting by adults 23 

Child examining flower; mother looking on 46 

Child holding baby's hand 256 

Children in classroom with hands raised 286 

Children in doorway of home 137 

Children of Israel carrying Golden Calf 278 

Children of Israel on march 249 

Children singing 468 

Ching, Shao 137 

Christ and the Fishermen Center spread, December 

Christ Taught How To Pray 

(flannelgraphs) Center spread, May 

Christmas Carolers Cover, December 

Christ's Gospel and Keys Restored (c) 

Inside back cover, February 

Church Correlation for Home Teaching (c) 

Outside back cover, November 

Clark, Diane 58 

Classroom in disorder 186 

Communication Filters (c) Inside back cover, July 

Computer which retrieves data from punched cards 273 

Connie Hall sitting in Springville, Utah, her home 136 

Couple in front of theater 402 

Couple with temple in background 142 

Couples representing youth 113 

Cover Pictures 

"Good Morning, Little Navaho Sisters" January 

God's World Is Beautiful February 

"He's My Friend" March 

Our First Rocky Mountain Sunday School April 

Learning To Pray May 

The Manti Temple June 

Have a Fun Time July 

A Boy and His Dog ...August 

In Thanks for Our Harvest September 

Flowers of Friendship October 

Love Is Service, Too November 

A Song of the Heart December 

Cowley, Elder Matthew W 310 

Crossing Salt Lake Desert in tracked vehicles 200 



Dance — numerous couples on floor dancing . 8 

Daniel Had Courage to Do Right 

(flannelgraphs) Center spread, September 

Danish script 195 

David and His Harp (little pictures) 

Center spread, December 

David before Saul Center spread, December 

Deacon collecting fast offering 274 

Detective examining evidence 122 

Disorder in classroom 247 



Page 

Dirksen, Everett M. (drawing) Back cover, January 

Ditches and healgates in Holy Land 156 

Doctor examining boy .215 

Doctrine and Covenants ...382 

Dwellings atop cliffs near Dead Sea 234 

E 

Elder using music to aid in teaching Navaho family 13 

Elderly couple 356 

Elders give Navaho family Gospel lesson 13 

Elders giving aid and comfort to sick 13 

Elders hitching a mule team 13 

Elijah and widow of Zaraphath 50 

Evans, Elder Richard L., with Kenny Hubbs and 

Elder Gordon B. Hinckley 238 

Executive at work in office 372 

Expanding Worlds in Childhood (c) 40 

F 

Family boarding train 236 

Family gathered around piano 354 

Family in car 236 

Family inspecting turkey Cover, September 

Family riding on train 237 

Family singing with girl playing piano 161 

Family station wagon 178 

Father and son chopping wood (cartoon) 19 

Father and son hiking on mountain trail ...back cover, June 

Father and son mowing lawn (cartoon) 18 

Father and son reading New Testament 231 

Father and son washing car (cartoon) 18 

Father holding baby, mother looking on 48 

Father holding son up to mirror 207 

Father, mother, and son looking forward 48 

Father observing son fixing bicycle 371 

Father playing piano with family gathered around 354 

Father reading Holy Bible to family 380 

Father studying with son and daughter 7 

Flannelgraphs 

The Good Samaritan Center spread, April 

Christ Taught How to Pray Center spread, May 

The Building of a Beautful City ....Center spread, June 
Joshua, A Great Leader Who Served the Lord 

Center spread, July 

The Sons of Adam and Eve Center spread, August 

Daniel Had Courage to Do Right 

Center spread, September 

The Greatest Gift of All Center spread, October 

A Message of Great Importance 

Center spread, November 

Flowers of Friendship Cover, October 

Football player breaking through line 192 

Football players during action of game 8 

Fortie, Eldon "Phantom," in football action 192 

Franklin, Benjamin 116 

G 

General Board, Members of the ©62 Cnvt 30 

General Board, Members of the ©63 Cnvt 30 

General Superintendency ©62 Cnvt 30 

General Superintendency (5)63 Cnvt 30 

Girl and boy with folded arms and back to back 202 

Girl combing her sister's hair Cover, November 

Girl feeding ducks by pond Front cover, February 

Girl playing piano with family singing in background ....161 

Girl returning lost $20 to bishop, mother looking on 313 

Girl talking on phone 325 

Girl with piglet Cover, March 

Girl writing in notebook 284 

Girls seated around soda fountain table 188 

God's World Is Beautiful Cover, February 

"Good Morning, Little Navaho Sisters" Cover, January 



DECEMBER 1963 



465 



Page 

Grandma and child — - 445 

Grandma and grandson 392 

Greatest Gift of All, The (Jesus Christ's birth) 

Good Samaritan, The (flannelgraphs) ...Center spread, April 

(flannelgraphs) Center spread, October 

Group of people assembled for unveiling of 

sculptured work 164, 167 

Grow, Stewart 58 

H 

Hall, Connie :'. 136 

Halliday, John R .,-.. 107 

Hamblin, Jacob and missionaries at dry water hole 79 

Have a Fun Time Cover, July 

Heaton, Brenda 59 

Heiner, Albert P. - - 246 

Herods of Judea, The (c) 453 

"He's My Friend" Cover, March 

Hill, Doris 58 

Hill George R .35, 399 

Hinckley, Elder Gordon B., with Kenny Hubbs 

and Elder Richard L. Evans 238 

Hintze, Sharon 58 

Home Teaching Organization (c) .430 

Horse drawn buggies crossing wasteland 321 

Hour glass, man in background 61 

Hubbs, Kenny, in baseball uniform 238, 239 

Hubbs, Kenny, shaking hands with his father 238 

Hubbs, Kenny, wtih Elders Gordon B. Hinckley 

and Richard L. Evans 238 

Hunter, Elder Howard W 240 

Hunters in natural forage 266 

Husband and wife at kitchen table 7 

Hutchings, Phillip . .... 136 

I 

In Thanks for Our Harvest Cover, September 

Instructor presenting lesson before students 27 

Interested parents with smiling son 292 

Isaksen, Henry L Ill 

J 

Jacob and Rachel at well Back cover, August 

James, Harry 12 

Jesus Christ 204, 277 

Jesus Christ ©62 Cnvt, Cover, 1 

Jesus Christ appearing to Mary 71 

Jesus Christ calling to fishermen 169 

Jesus Christ, head of 432 

Jesus Christ healing a sick man Back cover, December 

Jesus Christ healing the blind 438 

Jesus Christ speaking to lame man 338 

Jesus Christ statue 43 

Jesus Christ teaching 410 

Jesus Christ, the Saviour 104 

Jesus Christ Washing Peter's Feet.... Center picture, March 

Jesus Christ with outstretched arms 343 

Jesus Christ with Samaritan woman Back cover, August 

Joshua, A Great Leader Who Served the Lord 

(flannelgraphs) Center spread, July 

Judah family in Nancy, France 137 

Judging fruits ©63 Cnvt, Cover 

K 

Kainzinger, Petra 136 

Kartchner, Kenneth 58 

Keeler, Daniel A 69 

Keeley, Ralph B 69 

Kirbet Quamran near Dead Sea 234 

Kirtland Temple (interior scenes) Center pictures, April 



Page 



Lady and a boy holding hibiscus Cover, October 

Lake, Louise 59 

Laman, Eugene 12 

Lamanite missionary with Lamanite twins.... Cover, January 

"Last Supper, The" 305 

LDS Missionaries 397 

LDS Temples (c) Inside back cover, August 

Learning To Pray Cover, May 

Lee, Elder Harold B 224 

Librarian assisting Junior Sunday School teacher 133 

Lions 323 

Lloyd, Judy 58 

Locating buried pioneer equipment in desert 201 

Longest Infantry March in History, The 

Inside back cover, April 

Lord's Law of Revenue, The (c).. .Inside back cover, October 

Love Is Service, Too Cover, November 

Lund, Elder 13 

M 

Machine for translating and printing genealogical data.... 273 
Madison, James Back cover, July 

Magnetic tape reels on shelves 272 

Magnetic tape "reading" machine 273 

Main streets of new town in Israel 156 

Malachi, Prophet of Fulfillment Center picture, May 

Man and his shadow - 346 

Man and woman with Salt Lake Temple in background.. 6 

Man helping boy up trail Back cover, June 

Man involved in thought 39 

Man standing 188 

Man studying chart 336 

Manti Temple Cover, June 

Manuals: Genealogical Research, A Practical Mission.. ..271 
Map: Browne's vacation route 178 

Map: Palestine, showing location of Dead Sea 

Scrolls findings .233 

Map: U. S. — Stakes organized from Oct. 1847 

to March 1963 Inside back cover, June 

Maturity Characteristics of Ages 9 to 12 (c) 188 

Maturity Characteristics of Ages 13 to 19 (c) 

Inside back cover, May 

Maturity Characteristics of Young Children (c) 

Inside back cover, January 

McKay, David O., and two children 417 

McKay, David O. (Fox painting) 1, @62 Cnvt back cover 

McKay, David O. (Gittins' line drawing) 41, 229, 341 

McKay, David O. (Ralph Clark photo).... 149, 189, 269, 377, 

©63 Cnvt. back cover 

McKay, David O. (three paintings).. -Center spread, October 

McKay, David O. Center picture, January 

McKay, David O., at desk Center picture, January 

Men in business meeting 8 

Merkley, Marion G 69, 334 

Meeting of ward officers .. , 30, 33 

Mekiafa Vaifanua kneeling in front of his Samoan home.. 137 

Merthyr Tydfil Chapel 420 

Message of Great Importance, A (A Gospel conversion) 

(flannelgraphs Center spread, November 

Microfilm machine and worker 272 

Missionary reading book; thoughts of Alma meeting 

Amlici in background 162 

Monroe, James Back cover, March 

Mortar and pestle 426 

Mother and boy 449 

Mother and children praying at table 226 

Mother and children praying by bed 227 

Mother and daughter cleaning house (cartoon) 19 

Mother and daughter reading Bible , 72 



466 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Page 

Mother and daughter washing dishes (cartoon) 18 

Mother and teen-age daughter 394 

Mother helping son read book 371 

Mother holding baby 204 

Mother scolding child for taking cookies 92 

Mother teaching two sons 292 

Moyle, Henry D.; portrait Center spread, November 

Moyle, Henry D.; standing at pulpit 

Center spread, November 

Music to accompany sacrament gems .....29, 67, 103, 

139, 181, 217, 259, 295, 331, 367, 405- 451 

Musical score: "A Mighty Fortress" 405 

Musical score: "Hosanna" 296 

Musical score: "Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee" 253 

Musical score: "Sacrament Song. . . ." 103 

Musical score: "The Sacrament" 29 

Musical score: "What Glorious Scenes Mine Eyes 

Behold" 331 

Musical score: "While I Drink the Water Clear" 451 

N 

Native with machete in pineapple field. ...Back cover, October 

Nativity scene 407 

Nelson, Joan 57 

Nephi Fashioning Plates Center spread, June 

O 

Oakes, Keith R 69 

Our First Rocky Mountain Sunday School Cover, April 



Parents and children praying 6 

Parents admiring son's handiwork 292 

Parents and two sons 48 

Parents looking sternly at small son 215 

Parents with small daughter --■- 220 

Paul before Agrippa - Back cover, November 

Penrose, Elder Charles W., composing a poem 282 

Perkins, Elder 13 

Petra Kainzinger holding small model cottage 136 

Phillip Hutchings standing in front of home 136 

Pioneer men making adobe bricks 198 

Pioneer woman and son churning butter 197 

Pioneer woman shearing sheep 198 

Pioneers digging irrigation ditch 197 

Poineers gathering edible wild plants 197 

Pioneers harvesting wheat 196 

Pistol of Ephraim K. Hanks 158 

Priest handing sacrament tray to deacon 152 

Prepared teacher with two students 292 

Prison cell 91 

R 

Revere, Paul, house ... . - 178 

Rickenbacker, Eddie Back cover, September 

River scene 1' ' 



Sacred Grove 126 

Salt Lake City, aerial view .....209 

"Scrollery" at Palestine Archaelogical Museum 235 

Seminary Enrollment (c) Inside back cover, September 

Settlers getting rid of field mice before planting in 

Holy Land 156 

Shao Shing framed in window of her Taihoku, 

Taiwan home 137 

Signers of Declaration of Independence Back cover, July 

Silverton, Colo - Back cover, February 



Page 

Sing with Spirit and Understanding 

Inside back cover, December 

Sione Tau basking in Tonga tropical son 137 

Small boy praying, father assisting Cover, May 

Smith, Joseph . M - 77 

Smith, Joseph, home 179 

Snowstorm: motorists succoring other stranded 

motorists .118, 119 

Son fixing bicycle, father observing ...371 

Son reading book, mother helping 371 

Song of the Heart, A Cover, December 

Sons of Adam and Eve, The 

(flannelgraphs) Center spread, August 

Sources of Genealogical Information (c) 

Inside back cover, March 

South shore of Nova Scotia 177 

Stokes, Janet - 140 

Sunrays through cloud 253 



Tanner, Elder N. Eldort 280 

Tape punching machine with worker 272 

Tau, Sione ■ 137 

Taylor, George 58 

Taylor, Harvey L 27, 56 

Taylor, John, family pictures 428 

Teacher before students -443 

Teacher standing by students 215 

Teacher working in file box 168 

Technician looking through microscope 313 

Telescope 204 

Thomson, Ralph D 396 

Titles and Dates of Sunday School Lesson by Courses (c) 

Second Quarter, 1963 74, 75 

Third Quarter, 1963 185, 186 

Fourth Quarter, 1963 300, 301 

First Quarter, 1964 412, 413 

Tolman, James R 107 

Tonga children beside house frame 136 

Tonga children in front of new home .....136 

Two boys with model airplanes 402 

Two couples on picnic 402 

U 

Uncovered scrolls 235 

Unloading supplies into Bishops' Storehouse 322, 386 

Urry, Francis L„ as President Lorenzo Snow 321, 322 

V 

Vaieland, Aslaug 317 

Vaifanua, Mekiafa ...137 

Villa, Paiicho, and followers 108 

Village in Nova Scotia 177 

W 

Waist-high grain in Holy Land 156 

Well-adjusted children 293 

Whitmer, Peter, Sr., home of 422 

Whistler's Mother (painting) Back cover, May 

Willie, Wilbert Cover, January 

Women seated at table 8 



Young girl with expression of delight 97 

Young, Wayne 58 



Zechariah, Prophet to a New Generation 

Center picture, February 

Zion Is Growing (c) Inside back cover, June 



DECEMBER 1963 



467 



* 




ing witli spirit 

AND WITH UNDERSTANDING 



Music adds beauty to lives of 
all. In the words of Carlyle: "Music 
is well said to be the speech of angels; 
in fact, nothing among the utterances 
allowed to man is felt to be so divine. 
It brings us near to the Infinite; we 
look for moments across the cloudy 
elements into the eternal light, when song 
leads and inspires us." 1 

The hymns we sing "lead and inspire us." To 
be called to conduct the music of the worship service 
is a call to impress Gospel principles through hymns: 
We succeed in this calling only to the extent that 
those who sing under our direction are motivated 
toward living according to these principles. 

Singing hymns each Sunday morning sets the 
mood and atmosphere for the worship service and 
becomes an expression of our religious feelings. With 
the heartfelt singing of hymns, we pledge ourselves 
to serve our felldwmen. 

As choristers, We are first of all teachers of the 
Gospel. We want all hymns sung correctly, but 
rigid emphasis of musical details often kills the 
spirit and purpose of hymn singing. 

The spiritual experience of singing is the im- 
portant thing: 

"The congregation rightly prefers to be oblivious 
to the matter of tempo and is irritated and distracted 
from its business of worshipful singing if the con- 
ductor insists on changing the tempo. Nagging or 
driving the congregation is destructive of good hymn 
singing." 2 

While conducting the hymns, we communicate 
with the congregation by gestures only, and such 
gestures should conform to standard and accepted 
patterns. It is so easy to use these conventional 
patterns. If we do not do so, we only demonstrate 
that we do not know the rudiments of baton tech- 
nique; nor do we care enough about our calling to 
learn them. Conductors should use accepted pat- 
terns to indicate tempos, with appropriate signals 
for beginning arid ending hymns. 

"Our well-prepared choristers are the real lead- 
ers in any musical situation. They do not follow 
the organ or the congregation. They have taught the 



: Carlyle, Thomas, Essays, The Opera. 

2 Johnson, Clair W., Worship in Song, 1962 Edition; Deseret Book 
Company, Salt Lake City, Utah; page 39. 

* Brother Clair W. Johnson is presently serving as a member of 
the General Board of the Deseret Sunday School Union. He obtained 
his B.A. and M.A. degrees from Brigham Young University and his 
Ph.D. from the University of Southern California. 



group to follow the baton and to respond to the 
slightest gesture or facial expression." 3 

To the chorister it may be said: Be one with the 
congregation or the group you are leading; invite 
them to be one with you. This can only be accom- 
plished if the chorister is aware that he must com- 
municate — not only a beat-pattern, rhythm, united 
starts and stops — but also feeling and expression. 
He should look at his singers, for "we inspire through 
our eyes." 

Here are the five basic steps in the teaching- 
learning process as they might apply in our hymn 
singing: 

Introducing Gospel ideas through the hymns. 
When we sing "It May Not Be on the Mountain 
Height," we sing of obedience to the call to serve, 
of helping others, and of doing the will of the Lord 
with a sincere and willing heart. 

Repeating the hymn on successive Sundays, until 
it can be sung without the book and with an expres- 
sion of religious feeling. The chorister should plan 
a list of hymns to be used on successive Sundays. 
If we repeat many times, "Some wand'rer whom I 
should seek," from that same hymn, we become more ^^ 
aware of our obligation to bring others into activity. I ^ 

Understanding the hymns. Poetry in our hymns 
often needs clarification, especially for children, who 
need to understand what they are singing about. 
The chorister has an excellent opportunity during 
hymn practice to explain briefly Gospel principles 
introduced in the hymn being learned. Actually, 
the good chorister talks very little during a hymn 
practice. Too much talking defeats the purpose of 
practice singing and leaves the congregation with- 
out the spiritual uplift it should get from participa- 
tion. 

Believing the principles taught through hymns. 
We can help children believe, through the singing 
of a hymn, that we find happiness in service to others, 
and that those are greatest who serve mankind most 
faithfully. We can change a child's attitude and 
behavior, if we can inspire the child to pledge him- 
self in song by singing: "I'll do Thy will with a 
heart sincere." 

Applying the ideas expressed in the hymns in 
daily living. We have learned the lesson of a hymn 
only when we are obedient, when we are serving the 
Lord, and doing his will. When we have accom- 
plished this end, we may say as did the Apostle 
Paul, "... I will sing with the spirit, and I will 
sing with the understanding also." (J Corinthians 
14:15.) 

— Clair W. Johnson* 



3 Johnson, Clair W., Worship in Song, page 28. 
Library File Reference : Sunday Schools — Mormon Music. 



468 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



# # 




"The chorister should use a baton 
while conducting congregational singing. 
It is an accepted symbol of musical 
authority." 1 

The baton represents an extension of 
the forearm and is held in the palm of 
the hand in a straight line with the 
arm. The wrist should be loose and 
flexible. Patterns are beat with the right 
hand only, keeping the left hand free 
to express special effects, such as loud- 
ness or softness. 



AND WITH UNDERSTANDING 



"The young chorister first masters the 
baton patterns ... so that they become 
a natural means of communicating with 
organist and congregation." 1 The pat- 
terns are beat with the hand raised from 
the forehead down to the waist, keeping 
the elbow well away from the body. The 
down-beat should be in front of the face 
and not off to the side. In the drawings, 2 
dots indicate precise point where the 
beat occurs. (In teaching youngsters of 
Junior Sunday School, baton and con- 
ventional beat patterns are often set 
aside in favor of the interval-beat method 
of teaching. 3 ) 



Preparatory or Cue beat: Usually a short movement of 
the baton before the song begins: an upward movement if 
the first beat of the song is a down-beat, or a downward 
movement if the song begins on an up-beat. 



Release beat: A "cut-off" beat at the end of a verse or 
occasionally after a fermata. It is usually a short down- 
ward stroke. Conductors should learn to use both a pre- 
paratory and a release beat. 



Meaning of Musical Expressions in the Hymnbook 



Rit. (ritard.) — slacken the tempo grad- 
ually. 

Poco rit. — a slightly retarded tempo. 

Molto rit. — a greatly retarded tempo. 

Allegro — quick, lively. 

Maestoso — majestic, dignified. 

Marcato — accented or well-pronounced. 

A ndante— gracefully in moderate time. 



Adagio — slower than andante, but faster 
than largo. 

Largo — slowly and solemnly. 

Marcia — a march. 

Moderato — in moderate time. 

Forte— written "/"—loud. 

Double Forte — written "//" — very loud. 

Piano — written "p" — soft. 



Pianissimo — written "pp" — very soft. 

/" •""*■>• (fermata) — means to hold the 
note longer than its normal value. The 
director indicates this pause in music by 
holding the baton practically motion- 
less for the pause, then proceeding to 
the next count in the time pattern. 
"There is no definite time value or num- 
ber of counts . . . for any fermata. This 
is left to the judgment and musical taste 
of the director." 4 



<^x&Kj&>tsO**&^&^&*&™<&*'& v &^ v &*&™& v &^ 



Johnson, Clair W., Worship in Song; Deseret Book Company, 
Salt Lake City, Utah, 1962; page 25. 

2 See Johnson, Clair W., Worship in Song, pages 26, 27. 



s See A Guide for Choristers and Organists in Junior Sunday 
School; Deseret News Press, 1962; page 36. 

4 Johnson, Clair W., Worship in Song, pages 32-34. 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



DECEMBER 1963 



Compiled by Burl Shephard. 



Second Class Postage Paid 
at Salt Lake City, Utah 



"JUST AN OPTIMIST" 

Jesus and the sick man of Bethesda: ". . . Rise, take up thy bed, and walk" 



His eyes beamed as he answered 
my questions. We sat on a big, 
dark- green, leather sofa in the 
hotel lobby. 

"The future looks extremely 
bright," he said. There was a 
toughness in his broad, tanned 
face. His silver hair was thinning 
and receding; but he continued 
to talk spiritedly, like a boy on 
Christmas Eve. "We expect a ten 
per cent gain in our potato volume 
next year," he added. "Our fer- 
tilizer production should be up 
25 to 30 per cent." 

After our brief chat, I related 
our conversation to another busi- 
nessman in the hotel lobby. "Oh, 
he is just an optimist," my ac- 
quaintance said. 

Yes, the man is an optimist; 
but his record is impressive. He 1 
is one of the nation's large proc- 
essors of potatoes. His company 
is now turning out thirty different 
potato items, from frozen French 
fries to hash-browns. And the rec- 
ords show that America's per cap- 
ita consumption of processed po- 
tatoes has risen from less than two 
pounds in 1940 to nearly 36 
pounds in 1962. 2 

The more we look about us, 
the more we see optimists pushing 
the world toward new, exciting 
horizons. Conrad Nicholson Hil- 
ton, who directs a 293-million- 
dollar around - the - world hotel 
chain, is described in a Time 3 cover 
article as an "eternal optimist." 
The magazine illustrates the point 
with a word picture of the 75- 
year-old hotelman sitting on the 
terrace of his 61 -room mansion in 



(For Course 15, lesson of December 29, 
'Moroni's Farewell.") 
ij. R. Simplot of Boise, Idaho. 
■'Wall Street Journal, Aug. 13, 1963. 
&Time. July 19, 1963, pages 63-72. 



Bel Air, California. He was about 
to take off on a world-circling trip. 

Some of the great optimists are 
often those who may not appear 
to be such. 

We find no mention in the New 
Testament that Jesus laughed or 
even smiled. But the record does 
tell us that He wept over the death 
of Lazarus. In the synagogue, He 
was grieved because of the hard- 
ness of the Pharisees' hearts. 
Again, as they came seeking a 
sign, ". . . He sighed deeply in 
his spirit." 4 In Gethsemane He 
was ". . . sorrowful and very 
heavy." 5 

But as we follow in the foot- 
steps of Jesus, we realize that He 
was the supreme Optimist. He told 
the poor in spirit that theirs would 
be the kingdom of heaven. He 
assured those who prayed to the 
Father in secret that He would 
reward them openly. 

The humble Nazarene said that 
he who seeks shall find, and 
". . . to him that knocketh it 
shall be opened." 6 

To the centurion whose servant 
was stricken with palsy, the Mas- 
ter gave assurance that he would 
be healed. To a man beside a 
pool in Bethesda, infirm for 38 
years, He said: ". . . Rise, take 
up thy bed, and walk." 7 

Repeatedly to His Twelve He 
said that He would rise on the 
third day after His death. To 
the Eleven, after the Last Supper, 
He said, looking to the future: 
"In my Father's house are many 
mansions. ... I go to prepare a 
place for you." 8 Hanging pain- 

iMark, 8:12. 
oMatthew 26:37. 
GMatthew 7:8. 
■j John 5:8. 
8 John 14:2. 




fully on the cross, He assured the 
nearby malefactor that they 
would be together that very day 
in paradise. 

The world had never seen op- 
timism like that. 

To Peter, near Bethany, Jesus 
said: ". . . What things soever ye 
desire, when ye pray, believe that 
ye receive them, and ye shall have 
them." 9 On another occasion he 
said that a man with the faith of 
a mustard seed could move moun- 
tains. 

Jesus said that through Him, 
men would live again. All will 
receive a resurrection as did He. 
To some, He said, even godhood 
lies ahead. 

Those are the promises of the 
Master, the Optimist who told the 
sick man to arise and walk. And 
he did. Those are the assurances 
of Him who said he would rise 
on the third day. And He did. 

The optimism of Jesus brought 
new hope to the world. No won- 
der at His birth the wise men 
". . . rejoiced with exceeding great 
joy." 10 No wonder the angel said 
to the shepherds watching their 
flocks by night: "... I bring you 
good tidings of great joy. . . ." ia 

Perhaps he did not realize what 
a compliment he was really pay- 
ing, when that businessman said 
of another in the hotel lobby: 
"Oh, he is just an optimist" 

— Wendell J. Ashton. 



mark 11:24. 
^Matthew 2:10. 
"Luke 2:10. 
Library File Reference: Optimism.